Archive for December, 2011

MobileMonet HD app for Apple iPad

December 13, 2011

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The preceding gallery features a digital “painting” entitled, “Autumn Landscape at Huntley Meadows Park.” The digital image was created in the style of Claude Monet, a founder of French impressionist painting, using MobileMonet HD app for Apple iPad to post-process a photograph taken with the built-in camera of an Apple iPhone 4. Compare and contrast Photo 1 of 2 (the digital painting) with Photo 2 of 2 (the original photograph). Which version do you like more?

Tech Tips:MobileMonet HD” currently sells for $1.99 at the Apple iTunes Store.

Photos © Copyright 2011 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

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Diptychs of Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies

December 11, 2011

The following gallery features photos of Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum vicinum) spotted during a during a photowalk through Huntley Meadows Park on 02 December 2011. It was astounding to see dragonflies so late in the year — completely unexpected! Male Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies have red eyes and a red face, a brown thorax, a red abdomen, and red pterostigma near all four wingtips. Its body is approximately one-and-a-half to two inches (1.5 – 2″) in length.

These composite images, known as a diptychs, were created using Aperture and Diptic  app for Apple iOS mobile devices.

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Panels three and four (shown above, lower-left and lower-right) show a mating pair of Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies. Odonata, an order of insects including dragonflies and damselflies, reproduce in three stages: in tandem; in wheel (sometimes called “in heart” for damselflies); and oviposition. The dragonflies shown in Panels 3-4 are “in wheel,” in which the male (red abdomen) uses claspers at the end of his abdomen to hold the female by her thorax while they are joined at their abdomens. All dragonflies and damselflies have a 10-segmented abdomen: male dragonfly secondary genitalia are located in segments two and three (2 and 3); female genitalia in segment eight (8).

Photos © Copyright 2011 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Dragonflies and Damselflies of Huntley Meadows Park

December 9, 2011

I created a new local mission at Project Noah, announced via Twitter on Thursday, 08 December 2011.

You are invited to join the mission and upload spottings of dragonflies and damselflies seen at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

Eastern Amberwing dragonfly diptychs

December 9, 2011
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The preceding gallery shows diptychs of an Eastern Amberwing dragonfly (Perithemis tenera) spotted during a photowalk through Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

The diptychs (shown above), entitled “An Eastern Frame of Mind,” were created using Aperture and Diptic app for Apple iOS mobile devices. See full-size versions of the photos used to create the preceding diptychs: Eastern Amberwing dragonfly.

Copyright © 2011 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Common Whitetail: two- and three-panel diptychs

December 7, 2011

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The preceding gallery shows diptychs of Common Whitetail skimmer dragonflies (Libellula lydia) spotted during several photowalks. These individuals are female, as indicated by their brown bodies and mid-wing brownish-black bands that do not go edge-to-edge on translucent wings. (Males have a white abdomen and mid-wing brownish-black bands that go edge-to-edge on translucent wings.)

The diptychs (shown above), entitled “Whitetails Whose Tails Aren’t White,” were created using Aperture and Diptic app for Apple iOS mobile devices.

Related Resources:

See full-size versions of the photos used to create the preceding diptychs of dragonflies, arranged in reverse chronological order.

The following gallery shows four-panel diptychs of both male- and female Common Whitetail dragonflies.

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Photos © Copyright 2011 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Blue Dasher: three- and four-panel diptychs

December 5, 2011

The following gallery shows diptychs of male Blue Dasher dragonflies (Pachydiplax longipennis), members of the skimmer family of dragonflies, spotted during photowalks through Huntley Meadows Park.

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The diptychs (shown above), entitled “Dashing Blue Dashers,” were created using Aperture and Diptic  app for Apple iOS mobile devices. I still can’t decide whether I prefer a black- or white border — what do you think?

Related Resources:

See full-size versions of the photos used to create the preceding diptychs of dragonflies.

Photos © Copyright 2011 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Swallowtail butterfly: three- and four-panel diptychs

December 3, 2011

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The preceding gallery shows diptychs of an Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly (Papilio glaucus) feeding on Butterfly Weed (Asclepias tuberosa), a species of milkweed. This battle-scarred individual is missing one of his tails and a few chunks of its wings.

The diptychs (shown above), appropriately entitled “Catch a Tiger by the Tail,” were created using Aperture and Diptic  app for Apple iOS mobile devices. I still can’t decide whether I prefer a black- or white border — what do you think?

Related Resources:

Photos © Copyright 2011 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Diptic dilemna: Black or white border?

December 1, 2011
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Another “Hi-Res” Diptic (resolution = 2048 x 2048 pixels) of Slaty Skimmer dragonflies (Libellula incesta) spotted during photowalks through Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. The diptychs (shown above), entitled “Perching Slatys II,” were created using Aperture and Diptic  app for Apple iOS mobile devices. The color of the border is the only difference between the two Diptics — which color do you prefer, black or white?

The following gallery illustrates the workflow used to create the composite image in Diptic.

  1. Browse stock layouts; choose a layout (Image No. 1).
  2. Select photos (No. 2).
  3. Select the source of the photos to add to the layout; add photos (No. 3).
  4. Add effects; tap “Border” button (No. 4).
  5. Select border options (No. 5).
  6. Export Hi-Res Diptic (No. 6).
  7. Save output to “Saved Photos” (No. 7).
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Photos © Copyright 2011 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com


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