Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (female)

The following photo gallery shows a Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum), perching on the ground near a vernal pool/small permanent pond at Huntley Meadows Park (HMP).

A Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a heteromorph female.

15 OCT 2015 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (female)

This individual is a heteromorph female, as indicated by its coloration and terminal appendages.

A Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a heteromorph female.

15 OCT 2015 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (female)

There were noticeably fewer Blue-faced Meadowhawks at this location during Fall 2015 than in the past, perhaps a consequence of two consecutive colder than average winters. Just two females were spotted this year, both heteromorphs; no andromorph females were observed. No mating pairs were seen in 2015.

A Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a heteromorph female.

15 OCT 2015 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (female)

The reddish-brown leaves in the background remind me of marbled paper.

A Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a heteromorph female.

15 OCT 2015 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (female)

Notice the terminal appendages are flared in the last photo. The author has observed several species of odonates that exhibit this odd behavior, both male and female.

A Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a heteromorph female.

15 OCT 2015 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (female)

Copyright © 2015 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

2 Responses to “Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (female)”

  1. Anonymous Says:

    Walter,
    I doubt that colder winters have much to do with the abundance of Blue-faced Meadowhawks at vernal pond habitats. The temperature of water under ice stays at 32°F regardless of the air temperature. Here in Delaware, their yearly abundance is much more dependent on the length of time these habitats retain water. In the early 2000’s, we had a drought that resulted in many of these habitats being dry for over 12 months. That knocked down the populations for several years following. While there have been many Blue-faced Meadowhawks at a local habitat recently, there is no standing water as of this week. Last year at this time there was plenty of water in these “Delmarva Bays” that lasted through most of this past summer.
    Hal

  2. waltersanford Says:

    Thanks for your insightful comments, Hal. There was a prolonged drought all summer, after near-record-setting rainfall in June. Doesn’t bode well for a population rebound next year, based upon your experience.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: