Great Spangled Fritillary

The first two photos in this gallery show a Great Spangled Fritillary butterfly (Speyeria cybele) nectaring on Large-flower Tickseed (Coreopsis grandiflora).

A Great Spangled Fritillary butterfly (Speyeria cybele) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is feeding on an unknown yellow flower.

31 MAY 2015 | Huntley Meadows Park | Great Spangled Fritillary

A Great Spangled Fritillary butterfly (Speyeria cybele) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is feeding on an unknown yellow flower.

31 MAY 2015 | Huntley Meadows Park | Great Spangled Fritillary

This butterfly was spotted in a small meadow near a vernal pool in the forest at Huntley Meadows Park.

A Great Spangled Fritillary butterfly (Speyeria cybele) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

31 MAY 2015 | Huntley Meadows Park | Great Spangled Fritillary

The wings of Great Spangled Fritillary are equally beautiful in either ventral view (shown above) or dorsal view (shown below).

A Great Spangled Fritillary butterfly (Speyeria cybele) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

31 MAY 2015 | Huntley Meadows Park | Great Spangled Fritillary

Editor’s Note: Thanks to Matt Ryan, Naturalist at Huntley Meadows Park, for identifying the yellow flowering plant shown in this gallery.

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

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9 Responses to “Great Spangled Fritillary”

  1. Sarah Longes - Mirador Design Says:

    Stunning!

    • waltersanford Says:

      Thank you, Sarah! Sometimes good light (enhanced with an external flash unit) and the right camera settings results in especially crisp photos.

      • Sarah Longes - Mirador Design Says:

        I’m often worried about using flash when photographing butterflies and other wildlife, it’s startled them in the past! Do you diffuse or bounce light? The crispness and colour clarity is wonderful to see 🙂

        • waltersanford Says:

          No worries, Sarah. I’ve been using some sort of flash for nearly two years. I started with the pop-up flash on one of my cameras and progressed to larger, more powerful external flash units. Sometimes I use a snap-on plastic diffuser; most of the time I don’t. As far as I know, the flash has never spooked the wildlife I photograph. You noticed the upside of using fill flash; in my experience, there’s little if any downside. Go for it — I think you’ll like the results!

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