Snowy scenes along the Hike-Bike Trail

The “exposure triangle” has three corners: 1) Aperture; 2) Shutter Speed; and 3) ISO (light sensitivity). When shooting in “Program” mode and Auto ISO, all three corners of the exposure triangle are wildcards set by the camera. In “Aperture Priority” mode and Auto ISO, the user selects the aperture (lens opening) and the camera selects the shutter speed and ISO. In “Shutter Priority” mode and Auto ISO, the user selects the shutter speed and the camera selects the aperture (lens opening) and ISO. Finally, in “Manual” mode the user selects all three settings in the exposure triangle.

All of the photos in this post were shot in “Aperture Priority” mode at ISO 100. That leaves one corner of the exposure triangle for the camera to set: Shutter Speed. At an aperture of f/4 and ISO 100, the camera is set for a relatively wide lens opening and maximum light sensitivity. Ice and snow are very reflective surfaces, so it’s no surprise the camera selected fast shutter speeds to limit the amount of light received by the camera sensor. One upside of this combination of settings: Camera shake was virtually a non-factor!

The following gallery of photos shows views along the Hike-Bike Trail at Huntley Meadows Park, a little more than a week after the “Blizzard of 2016.”

The view along the Hike-Bike Trail at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

4mm (25mm, 35mm equivalent) | f/4 | 1/2000s | ISO 100 | -1 ev

Notice that exposure compensation (ev) was used for most of the photos. In “Aperture Priority” mode at a fixed ISO, exposure compensation affects shutter speed: negative exposure values (ev) make the shutter speed faster, further reducing the amount of light received by the camera sensor; positive exposure values make the shutter speed slower, increasing the amount of light received.

Looking downstream along a creek that crosses the Hike-Bike Trail.

Looking downstream along a creek that crosses the Hike-Bike Trail at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

4mm | f/4 | 1/1000s | ISO 100 | -1 ev

Approaching the observation platform at the terminus of the Hike-Bike Trail. Notice the chromatic aberration in the tree tops at the upper-right corner of the photo.

Looking toward the observation platform at the terminus of the Hike-Bike Trail, Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

4mm | f/4 | 1/1600s | ISO 100 | -1 ev

Looking toward the observation platform.

Approaching the observation platform at the terminus of the Hike-Bike Trail, Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

4mm | f/4 | 1/1300s | ISO 100 | 0 ev

The central wetland area, as viewed from the observation platform. Notice the observation tower is faintly visible at the far side of the wetlands.

The central wetland area, as viewed from the observation platform at the terminus of the Hike-Bike Trail, Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

4mm | f/4 | 1/2000s | ISO 100 | -1 ev

A vernal pool located near the terminus of the Hike-Bike Trail. The pool is mostly covered by ice and snow and somewhat difficult to see in the following photo.

A vernal pool located near the terminus of the Hike-Bike Trail at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

4mm | f/4 | 1/2000s | ISO 100 | -1 ev

A view of the “Mystery Pool.”

A view of the "Mystery Pool," Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

4mm | f/4 | 1/1600s | ISO 100 | -1 ev

Heading toward the parking lot at the beginning of the Hike-Bike Trail.

The view along the Hike-Bike Trail at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

4mm | f/4 | 1/500s | ISO 100 | 0 ev

Related Resource: The exposure triangle and exposure compensation.

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

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5 Responses to “Snowy scenes along the Hike-Bike Trail”

  1. Mike Powell Says:

    Beautiful shots, Walter. I love how the park looks in the snow. I have never approached the park from that side when there was snow on the ground, so it’s great to see what conditions were like.

    • waltersanford Says:

      Thanks, Mike! The park must have been astonishingly beautiful immediately after the storm ended, when the snow was pristine. For what it’s worth, Photos 1, 2, 4, and 7 are my favorites.

  2. Christy Says:

    Walter, You have a true eye for landscape photography. These photos are beautiful. Mystery Pool is stunning. I’m glad I had this chance to see them.

  3. Answer key, The “Bridge to Nowhere” | walter sanford's photoblog Says:

    […] the stream, click on the waypoint marker in the interactive Google Map (shown above). See also Snowy scenes along the Hike-Bike Trail, posted in the aftermath of the “Blizzard of […]

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