Macromiidae exuvia

A dragonfly exuvia was collected along the Potomac River at Riverbend Park in Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This specimen is a member of the Family Macromiidae (Cruisers).

The following macro photo enabled me to see most of the critical field marks required to make an identification to the family level for this specimen. Here’s the decision tree I used to tentatively identify the exuvia as a member of the Cruiser Family.

  • The specimen has a mask-like labium.
  • The teeth on the margins of the labium have a regular pattern. (The pattern reminds me of a “spork.”)
  • There is a horn between the eyes. Its eyes are small, wide set, and stick up.

Turns out I was correct — the exuvia is a member of the Family Macromiidae! Thanks to aquatic entomologist Celeste Searles Mazzacano, Ph.D., for verifying my tentative identification.

A dragonfly exuvia spotted at Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve. This specimen is a member of the Family Macromiidae (Cruisers).

ISO 400 | 50mm | 0 ev | f/22 | 1/500s

The next photo shows a dorsal view that should enable me to identify the specimen to the genus and species level, a work in progress. In Northern Virginia, probable species in the Cruiser Family include Stream Cruiser (Didymops transversa), Swift River Cruiser (Macromia illinoiensis illinoiensis), and Royal River Cruiser (Macromia taeniolata).

A dragonfly exuvia spotted at Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve. This specimen is a member of the Family Macromiidae (Cruisers).

ISO 800 | 35.8mm (54mm, 35mm equivalent) | 0 ev | f/20 | 180s

Tech Tips:

The following equipment was used to shoot the preceding photographs:

Adobe Photoshop CC 2015 was used for minor touch-up work on the background of both photos.

Related Resources:

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

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One Response to “Macromiidae exuvia”

  1. Macromia illinoiensis exuvia | walter sanford's photoblog Says:

    […] update: Macromiidae exuvia. When this post was published on 19 April 2016, I was a novice at identifying odonate […]

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