Odonart

Last year I coined the term “Odonart” and created an “Odonart Portfolio.” Odonart is a concatenation of two words: odonate (dragonflies and damselflies); and art.

During a recent photowalk at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge (OBNWR), I shot several photos of two female Halloween Pennant dragonflies (Celithemis eponina) that I think are worthy of my portfolio.

The first photo is one of my favorites in this set.

A Halloween Pennant dragonfly (Celithemis eponina) spotted at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female.

11 JUL 2016 | OBNWR | Halloween Pennant (female)

Halloween Pennants prefer to perch at the top of tall vegetation such as the Eastern gamagrass (Tripsacum dactyloides) shown in all of the photos. Eastern gamagrass is a grass that grows five- to six feet in height — a perfect perch for isolating the pennants against a deep blue sky!

A Halloween Pennant dragonfly (Celithemis eponina) spotted at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female.

11 JUL 2016 | OBNWR | Halloween Pennant (female)

A Halloween Pennant dragonfly (Celithemis eponina) spotted at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female.

11 JUL 2016 | OBNWR | Halloween Pennant (female)

The last two photos are among my favorites in this gallery.

A Halloween Pennant dragonfly (Celithemis eponina) spotted at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female.

11 JUL 2016 | OBNWR | Halloween Pennant (female)

A Halloween Pennant dragonfly (Celithemis eponina) spotted at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female.

11 JUL 2016 | OBNWR | Halloween Pennant (female)

Editor’s Note: Sincere thanks to Daffny Pitchford, Refuge Manager, Potomac River NWRC, for identifying the Eastern gamagrass shown in all of the photos in this gallery.

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

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8 Responses to “Odonart”

  1. laura lecce Says:

    Hi Walter,
    That first pic is stunning! I love the illumination of the body which really makes it stand out. Great photo!
    Laura

    • waltersanford Says:

      Thanks, Laura! I like the color contrast provided by the burnt-orange anthers of the Eastern gamagrass.

      • laura lecce Says:

        Just noticed the bright yellow tip on each of the wings!

        • waltersanford Says:

          All dragonflies have colored bars near their wing tips technically known as pterostigmata. Some people simply call them stigma. Their function is unknown; some experts speculate they may enable/facilitate balanced flight. Stigma vary in color depending upon the species of dragonfly. Sometimes males and females of the same species have different colored stigma. For example, mature male Halloween Pennants have magenta stigma; immature males and mature females have cream (or light yellow) colored stigma.

  2. Nick'swildlife Says:

    Great photos, I’m definitely a fan of the odonart!

    • waltersanford Says:

      Thanks, Nick! Some species of odonates are spectacularly beautiful. Halloween Pennant, especially female HPs, is certainly on the short list of the most beautiful.

  3. Top 10 Photos of 2016 | walter sanford's photoblog Says:

    […] 11 JUL 2016 | OBNWR | Halloween Pennant (female) […]

  4. Peopoll’s Choice Awards – Top 10 Photos of 2016 | walter sanford's photoblog Says:

    […] 11 JUL 2016 | OBNWR | Halloween Pennant (female) […]

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