Return to terra firma

Several Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum ambiguum) were spotted near two vernal pools at a remote location in Huntley Meadows Park. All of these individuals are males, as indicated by their coloration and terminal appendages.

A Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male.

12 SEP 2016 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male)

The next photo shows one of the males perching in the obelisk position.

Many dragonflies [perch in the] obelisk position to limit the amount of sunlight hitting their body and use their wings to shade their overheated thoracic flight muscles. Why not just find a shady spot? If he did he would relinquish his territory and that would reduce his chances for mating. Source Credit: Richard Orr, renowned expert on odonates of the mid-Atlantic region of the United States.

A Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male.

12 SEP 2016 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male)

Regular readers of my photoblog know I’m fond of head-tilts in which the dragonfly seems to display some of its personality, especially when the individual is looking at me. I nicknamed this guy “Paleface” because his face is a lighter shade of turquoise than most male Blue-faced Meadowhawks.

A Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male.

12 SEP 2016 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male)

The last three photographs were taken in a dry drainage ditch located near one of the vernal pools. According to the most recent U.S. Drought Monitor update, parts of the Washington, D.C. metropolitan region are “abnormally dry” — one classification category from “drought.”

A Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male.

12 SEP 2016 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male)

A Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male.

12 SEP 2016 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male)

A Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male.

12 SEP 2016 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male)

The Backstory: Teneral Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies were observed at Huntley Meadows Park during late-May and early-June 2016, documented in Previews of coming attractions by Walter Sanford. (Hey, that’s me!) A pull quote from that blog post explains the title of this one.

Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies are classified as a fall species of odonate. In the mid-Atlantic United States, meadowhawks seem to disappear for several months after they emerge during early summer and reappear during fall. Where do they go? No one knows for sure. I speculate Blue-faced Meadowhawks are an arboreal species of dragonfly that returns to the ground/water when it’s time to mate.

It must be time for Blue-faced Meadowhawks to mate, because they’ve returned to terra firma!

Related Resources:

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

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5 Responses to “Return to terra firma”

  1. More previews of coming attractions | walter sanford's photoblog Says:

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    […] Return to terra firma – first sighting of adult Blue-faced Meadowhawks in 2016 […]

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    […] Return to terra firma – first sighting of adult Blue-faced Meadowhawks in 2016 […]

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    […] 12 SEP 2016 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male) […]

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    […] 12 SEP 2016 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male) […]

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