MYN – Too dark or too light?

The following Anisoptera exuvia — collected by Freda van den Broek on 10 June 2019 along the Red Cedar River in Barron County, Wisconsin USA — is definitely a member of Family Gomphidae (Clubtails), possibly Rusty Snaketail (Ophiogomphus rupinsulensis).

Dorsal-lateral view

Nine (9) photos of the specimen were taken using an aperture of f/16; in-camera focus peaking was used to highlight select areas in each photo. Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to create the focus-stacked composite image shown below.

10 JUN 2019 | Barron County, WI | Anisoptera exuvia (dorsallateral)

When I previewed the RAW files used to create the preceding composite image, I thought most of the files look too dark.

So I did a do-over using 15 photos, resulting in a new version of the composite that is perfectly in focus but a little too light. Compare/contrast the two composite images and you should notice it’s easier to see the mid-dorsal hooks along the abdomen in the first image. The primary purpose for the images is to illustrate those field marks, therefore I think the first (darker) image is better.

10 JUN 2019 | Barron County, WI | Anisoptera exuvia (dorsallateral)

Face-head-dorsal view

Five (5) photos of the specimen were taken using an aperture of f/16; in-camera focus peaking was used to highlight select areas in each photo. Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to create the focus-stacked composite image shown below.

10 JUN 2019 | Barron County, WI | Anisoptera exuvia (face-head-dorsal)

My first impression of the version shown above is it’s too dark, and I second-guessed myself for not shooting more photos for the focus stack.

I created a new focus-stacked composite image using a little more light and 14 photos. When I examined the RAW files used to create the new composite image (shown below), I thought most of the files still look too dark. (But I was wrong.)

10 JUN 2019 | Barron County, WI | Anisoptera exuvia (face-head-dorsal)

So I created a third version using much more light and 24 photos. Although it’s debatable which image looks best, the first- and second images show a few key field marks of the antennae better than the third image.

It turns out the antennae are one indicator this specimen is from the genus Ophiogomphus (Snaketails), so the first two (darker) images are the winners once again.

10 JUN 2019 | Barron County, WI | Anisoptera exuvia (face-head-dorsal)

For what it’s worth, the second of three images is my favorite as indicated by the fact that the image is cropped so there’s room for annotations.

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

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