Archive for the ‘Fujifilm EF-42’ Category

Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria)

February 10, 2015

Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria), shown below, is an invasive plant that was spotted during a photowalk along the boardwalk in the hemi-marsh at Huntley Meadows Park on 29 August 2014.

One mature plant can produce more than 2 million seeds annually. Seeds are easily dispersed by water and in mud adhered to aquatic wildlife, livestock and people. Source Credit: Purple Loosestrife, Ecology and Management of Invasive Plants Program, Cornell University.

Park staff members removed these plants soon after I photographed them. If you see this plant anywhere at the park, then please stop by the Visitor Center in order to notify a staff member of your sighting.

Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria)

Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria)

Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria)

Editor’s Note: Thanks to Kevin Munroe, Manager, Huntley Meadows Park, and Matt Ryan, Naturalist, for identifying the flowering plant shown in my photos. I knew the plant was one I’d never seen at the park; I didn’t know it’s an invasive species that spreads rapidly.

Copyright © 2015 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Year in review: New finds in 2014 (odonates)

November 20, 2014

In addition to several “New discoveries in 2014,” I spotted several species of odonates in 2014 that were new finds for my “life list,” as well as a few first-time sightings of either a male or female for familiar species of dragonflies.

Ashy Clubtail dragonfly (male)

This is my first confirmed spotting of an Ashy Clubtail dragonfly (Gomphus lividus).

Ashy- or Lancet Clubtail

02 May 2014 | Meadowood Recreation Area

Common Baskettail dragonfly (male)

This is my first confirmed spotting of a male Common Baskettail dragonfly (Epitheca cynosura). I have seen a few females in the past.

Common Baskettail dragonfly (male)

02 May 2014 | Meadowood Recreation Area

Bar-winged Skimmer dragonfly (young male)

This is my first spotting of a Bar-winged Skimmer dragonfly (Libellula axilena).

Bar-winged Skimmer dragonfly (young adult male)

31 May 2014 | Huntley Meadows Park

Painted Skimmer dragonflies (male, female)

Although I had seen one Painted Skimmer dragonfly (Libellula semifasciata) in the past, these individuals are among the first ones I photographed.

Painted Skimmer dragonfly (male)

Male | 06 June 2014 | Huntley Meadows Park

Painted Skimmer dragonfly (female)

Female | 23 May 2014 | Huntley Meadows Park

Swamp Darner dragonfly (female, oviposition)

I have seen lots of Swamp Darner dragonflies (Epiaeschna heros) in the past, but it’s challenging to identify their gender on the wing. I photographed one perching male on 04 June 2012. The following individual is one of the first confirmed females that I have spotted.

Swamp Darner dragonfly (female, oviposition)

02 June 2014 | Huntley Meadows Park

Spot-winged Glider dragonfly (female)

This is the first confirmed female Spot-winged Glider dragonfly (Pantala hymenaea) that I have spotted.

Spot-winged Glider dragonfly (Pantala hymenaea)

15 July 2014 | Beacon of Groveton

Eastern Pondhawk dragonflies (mating pair, in wheel)

This mating pair of Eastern Pondhawk dragonflies (Erythemis simplicicollis) is one of the first times I was quick enough to photograph a pair “in wheel.” This image is also among the first photographs taken using my Fujifilm X-T1 digital camera, 55-200mm zoom lens (88-320mm, 35mm equivalent), and Fujifilm Shoe Mount Flash EF-42 in TTL mode.

Eastern Pondhawk dragonflies (mating pair, in wheel)

20 August 2014 | Huntley Meadows Park

Slender Spreadwing damselfly (male)

I have seen many female Slender Spreadwing damselflies (Lestes rectangularis) in the past, but this is the first male I spotted.

Slender Spreadwing damselfly (male)

28 September 2014 | Huntley Meadows Park

Shadow Darner dragonfly (male)

Although I have spotted Shadow Darner dragonflies (Aeshna umbrosa) in the past, this is one of the first individuals I photographed.

Shadow Darner dragonfly (male)

24 October 2014 | Huntley Meadows Park

Related Resources:

Editor’s Note: This is Part 2 in a three-part series — a retrospective look at 2014.

Copyright © 2014 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

“X” marks the spot for love!

August 28, 2014

“X” marks the spot for some dragonfly love, that is.

Eastern Pondhawk dragonflies (mating pair, in wheel)

Mating Pair No. 1: Male 1; Female 1.

This post features photos of three mating pairs of Eastern Pondhawk dragonflies (Erythemis simplicicollis) spotted on 20 August 2014 during a photowalk along the boardwalk in the hemi-marsh at Huntley Meadows Park. All three pairs are shown “in wheel”: the males are on top; the females are on the bottom.

The next two photos show another male mating with two different females at same spot, several hours apart.

Eastern Pondhawk dragonflies (mating pair, in wheel)

Mating Pair No. 2: Male 2; Female 2.

I have noticed some individuals of some species of dragonflies are creatures of habit that return to the same location day-after-day. For example, I think “Male 2” is the young male that I photographed in another mating pair at the same spot on 15 August 2014; notice the blue pruinescence that covers his body more completely five days after the first photos were taken on the 15th.

Immature [male] colored as female, becomes pruinose first on abdomen and then thorax. Color change begins at about a week of age and takes about 2–3 weeks, fastest at higher temperatures.” Source Credit: Paulson, Dennis (2011-12-19). Dragonflies and Damselflies of the East (Princeton Field Guides) (Kindle Locations 10207-10208). Princeton University Press. Kindle Edition.

Eastern Pondhawk dragonflies (mating pair, in wheel)

Mating Pair No. 3: Male 2; Female 3.

Related Resources:

Editor’s Note: The preceding photos were taken using my new Fujifilm X-T1 digital camera and 55-200mm zoom lens (88-320mm, 35mm equivalent). I used the Fujifilm Shoe Mount Flash EF-42 in TTL mode with a shutter speed of 1/250s — John Greengo is right, 1/250s works as well or better than the X-T1’s 180x default sync speed!

More Related Resources:

Copyright © 2014 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


%d bloggers like this: