Posts Tagged ‘andromorph’

Aurora Damsel (mating pair, in heart)

June 14, 2019

The mating pair of Aurora Damsel (Chromagrion conditum) shown in the following photograph is “in wheel,” in which the male uses “claspers” (terminal appendages) at the end of his abdomen to hold the female by her neck/thorax while they are joined at their abdomens. The male — blue, yellow, and black in color — is on top; the female — yellow and black in color — is on the bottom.

The copulatory, or wheel, position is unique to the Odonata, as is the distant separation of the male’s genital opening and copulatory organs. Source Credit: Paulson, Dennis (2011-12-19). Dragonflies and Damselflies of the East (Princeton Field Guides) (Kindle Locations 377-378). Princeton University Press. Kindle Edition.

The wheel position is sometimes referred to as “in heart” when damselflies mate.

04 JUN 2019 | PNC. William County, VA | Aurora Damsel (mating pair)

Female C. conditum is polymorphic, including two morphs: an andromorph with blue coloration similar to male; or a heteromorph with an entirely yellow thorax, as shown above.

It’s helpful to take photos of mating pairs of damselflies, especially “in wheel,” since males and females of the same species can look quite different.

Taxonomy

C. conditum is a monotypic genus in the Family Coenagrionidae (Narrow-winged Damselflies).

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

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Blue-fronted Dancers (male, female)

March 22, 2019

Male

A Blue-fronted Dancer damselfly (Argia apicalis) was spotted near Mulligan Pond at Jackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

This individual is a male, as indicated by the pattern of blue coloration on his thorax and abdomen, plus the blue coloration on abdominal segments eight through 10 (S8-10).

25 SEP 2016 | Jackson Miles Abbott WR | Blue-fronted Dancer (male)

Female

Several Blue-fronted Dancers were spotted during a photowalk along Accotink Creek/Great Blue Heron Trail at Accotink Bay Wildlife Refuge (ABWR), Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

The first individual is a female, as indicated by two field marks.

Eyes brown, darker above; lack of blue in eyes in andromorph good distinction from male. Source Credit: Paulson, Dennis (2011-12-19). Dragonflies and Damselflies of the East (Princeton Field Guides) (Kindle Locations 3451-3452). Princeton University Press. Kindle Edition.

Female Blue-fronted Dancers are polymorphicandromorph females are blue like males; heteromorph females are brown-green. Andromorph females tend to be a lighter shade of blue than males of the same species.

This individual is a blue andromorph. Regardless of the color morph…

females never have blue on the last abdominal segments (S8-10). Source Credit: Michael Boatwright, founder and administrator of the Virginia Odonata Facebook group.

02 AUG 2016 | ABWR | Blue-fronted Dancer (female)

More males

Two male Blue-fronted Dancers were spotted at Accotink Bay Wildlife Refuge.

02 AUG 2016 | ABWR | Blue-fronted Dancer (male)

02 AUG 2016 | ABWR | Blue-fronted Dancer (male)

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Springtime Darner (terminal appendages)

September 11, 2017

Male and female Springtime Darner dragonflies (Basiaeschna janata) are colored similarly sometimes. Terminal appendages can be used to identify gender.

Male

Male dragonflies have three terminal appendages, collectively called “claspers,” that are used to grab and hold female dragonflies during mating: an upper pair of cerci (“superior appendages”); and a lower unpaired epiproct (“inferior appendage”).

A male Springtime Darner was spotted along a mid-size rocky stream located at Hemlock Overlook Regional Park (HORP), Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

(See a full-size version of the original photo, without annotation.)

Female

Female dragonflies have a pair of cerci (superior appendages) that have little or no function.

Female Springtime Darners are polymorphic: the spots on their abdomen are either blue (andromorphic) or green (heteromorphic); this female — spotted at a remote location in Huntley Meadows Park (HMP) — is a blue andromorph.

15 APR 2016 | HMP | Springtime Darner (female, blue andromorph)

(See a full-size version of the original photo, without annotation.)

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Powdered Dancer (males, female)

August 20, 2017

A Powdered Dancer damselfly (Argia moesta) was spotted during a photowalk along a mid-size rocky stream in Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, as indicated by his terminal appendages. There is a whitish-blue morph female Powdered Dancer, therefore the male’s whitish-blue coloration is insufficient to identify its gender.

21 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Powdered Dancer (male)

A week later, a mating pair of Powdered Dancers was spotted along the Potomac River at Riverbend Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is “in tandem“: the male is on the upper-left; the female on the lower-right.

28 JUN 2017 | Riverbend Park | Powdered Dancers (mating pair, in tandem)

The male is “contact guarding” the female as the pair flies “in tandem” to egg-laying sites where the female uses her ovipositor to insert eggs into vegetation (endophytic oviposition).

It’s helpful to take photos of mating pairs of damselflies, especially “in tandem,” since males and females of the same species can look quite different.

Female Powdered Dancers are polymorphic, including a whitish-blue andromorph and a brown heteromorph. The brown morph, shown in this pair, is more common than whitish-blue.

28 JUN 2017 | Riverbend Park | Powdered Dancers (mating pair, in tandem)

Did you notice the male Stream Bluet damselfly (Enallagma exsulans) perching near the Powdered Dancers? Thanks to Karen Kearney and Michael Boatwright, members of the Virginia Odonata Facebook group, for confirming my tentative identification of the Stream Bluet.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Blue-fronted Dancer damselfly (female)

January 18, 2017

Blue-fronted Dancer damselfly (Argia apicalis) was spotted during a photowalk along Accotink Creek Trail at Accotink Bay Wildlife Refuge (ABWR), Fairfax County, Virginia USA. An old wooden boardwalk is located near the terminus of the trail.

A Blue-fronted Dancer damselfly (Argia apicalis) spotted along Accotink Creek at Accotink Bay Wildlife Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female.

07 AUG 2016 | ABWR | Blue-fronted Dancer (female andromorph)

This individual is a female andromorph, as indicated by her coloration and terminal appendages. Females have a noticeably thicker abdomen than males.

Female Blue-fronted Dancers are polymorphic: andromorph females are blue like males; heteromorph females are brown. Andromorph females tend to be a lighter shade of blue than males of the same species, and do not feature the same blue coloration as males on abdominal segments eight, nine, and 10 (S8-10).

A Blue-fronted Dancer damselfly (Argia apicalis) spotted along Accotink Creek at Accotink Bay Wildlife Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female.

07 AUG 2016 | ABWR | Blue-fronted Dancer (female andromorph)

The taxonomic classification of Blue-fronted Dancer is as follows: Order Odonata (Dragonflies and Damselflies); Suborder Zygoptera (Damselflies); Family Coenagrionidae (Narrow-winged Damselflies); Genus Argia (Dancers); Species apicalis.

Related Resources: Excellent digital scans created by Gayle and Jeanelle Strickland. Click on the button labeled “Download file” in order to view full-size version of the graphics.

Editor’s Note: This is the first female Blue-fronted Dancer that I’ve seen/photographed. Thanks to Michael Moore and Ed Lam, members of the Northeast Odonata Facebook group, for verifying my tentative identification. Dr. Michael Moore is an active contributor to the Dragonfly and Damselfly Field Guide and ID App; Ed Lam is author and illustrator of Damselflies of the Northeast.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

New discoveries in 2016

December 26, 2016

The more you know, the more you know how much you don’t know. Huh? There’s always more to discover/learn! My new discoveries in 2016 are presented in reverse-chronological order.

Eastern Amberwing dragonfly exuviae

Perithemis tenera exuviae, published on 06 December 2016.

An Eastern Amberwing dragonfly (Perithemis tenera) exuvia collected from the Potomac River, Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

07 JUL 2016 | Potomac River | Eastern Amberwing (exuvia, head-on)

I’m a man on a mission to demystify the art and science of odonate exuviae identification. The task is as challenging as I was led to believe, but with determination and persistence it is do-able.

The specimens featured in this post are the first odonate exuviae that I was able to identify to the species level. Although the specimens were collected in early July, they were identified in early December. New species will be added to my Odonate Exuviae page when their identity is confirmed.


Mulligan Pond at Jackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge (JMAWR) is a familiar location where several species, previously unknown to occur at the park, were discovered in 2016.

Shadow Darner dragonfly

Shadow Darner dragonfly (female), posted on 18 October 2016.

A Shadow Darner dragonfly (Aeshna umbrosa) spotted at Mulligan Pond, Jackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female heteromorph.

14 OCT 2016 | JMAWR | Shadow Darner (female heteromorph)

Russet-tipped Clubtail dragonfly

Russet-tipped Clubtail dragonfly (male), posted on 26 September 2016.

Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly

Another new species discovered at JMAWR, posted on 20 September 2016.

Lancet Clubtail dragonfly

Identifying clubtails by the calendar, posted on 30 June 2016.

A Lancet Clubtail dragonfly (Gomphus exilis) spotted at Mulligan Pond, Jackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male.

26 JUN 2016 | JMAWR | Lancet Clubtail (male)


In addition to my contributions to the odonate species list at Jackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge, Mike Powell discovered the first official record of Swift Setwing at JMAWR and in Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Rambur’s Forktail damselfly (female)

December 16, 2016

A Rambur’s Forktail damselfly (Ischnura ramburii) was spotted at Mason Neck West Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is an immature heteromorph female, as indicated by the reddish-orange coloration of her thorax and abdominal segments one and two (S1-2), and reddish-orange postocular spots; her coloration will become duller as she matures. Andromorph females are colored like males.

A Rambur's Forktail damselfly (Ischnura ramburii) spotted at Mason Neck West Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is an immature heteromorph female.

03 OCT 2016 | Mason Neck West Park | Rambur’s Forktail (female)

This sighting was another reminder of one of many Walterisms: Don’t be dismissive! Huh? Male Rambur’s Forktail damselflies look similar to male Eastern Forktail damselflies (Ischnura verticalis). Eastern Forktails are relatively common, especially during spring and early-summer. Common. That’s the key word. When I noticed several male Rambur’s Forktails at the water retention pond I thought, “Oh, Eastern Forktails. Nothing to see here, folks. Move along.” Fortunately I spotted the immature heteromorph female and realized the error of my ways.

I’ll say it again: Don’t be dismissive — that kind of thinking can result in missed opportunities for wildlife photographers. I never expected to see Rambur’s Forktails at Mason Neck West Park and my preconceptions almost caused me to miss a golden opportunity to see a relatively uncommon damselfly.

Related Resources: Excellent digital scans created by Gayle and Jeanelle Strickland. Click on the button labeled “Download file” in order to view full-size version of the graphics.

  • Ischnura ramburii female #2 | heteromorph female | JPG
  • Ischnura ramburii female #8 | andromorph female | JPG
  • Ischnura ramburii male #2 | male | JPG

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Blue-faced Meadowhawk mating frenzy

December 8, 2016

Old Colchester Park and Preserve (OCPP), Fairfax County, Virginia USA is one of a few places in Northern Virginia where Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum) is known to occur. OCPP is located near Mason Neck West Park.

More than ten mating pairs of Blue-faced Meadowhawks were spotted at a small vernal pool in the park; the pool was almost completely dry on the day of my visit.

Andromorph females

Some species of dragonflies, such as Blue-faced Meadowhawk, display sexual dimorphism; females are polymorphic for a smaller subset of those species. Andromorph females are male-like in color; heteromorph females are duller in color than males.

Andromorph female Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies, like the ones shown below, are less common than heteromorph females. Andromorphs have a red abdomen with black rings, like male Blue-faced Meadowhawks; unlike males, most female faces are tan and their terminal appendages look different than male appendages.

No. 1

A mating pair of Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Old Colchester Park and Preserve, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is "in wheel." The female is an andromorph.

27 SEP 2016 | OCPP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (mating pair, “in wheel“)

No. 2

A mating pair of Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Old Colchester Park and Preserve, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is "in wheel." The female is an andromorph.

27 SEP 2016 | OCPP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (mating pair, “in wheel“)

No. 3

A mating pair of Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Old Colchester Park and Preserve, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is "in wheel." The female is an andromorph.

27 SEP 2016 | OCPP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (mating pair, “in wheel“)

Heteromorph females

The following photos show heteromorph female Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies. Heteromorphs have a tan abdomen with black rings.

No. 4

A mating pair of Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Old Colchester Park and Preserve, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is "in wheel." The female is a heteromorph.

27 SEP 2016 | OCPP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (mating pair, “in wheel“)

No. 5

A mating pair of Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Old Colchester Park and Preserve, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is "in wheel." The female is a heteromorph.

27 SEP 2016 | OCPP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (mating pair, “in wheel“)

No. 6

A mating pair of Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Old Colchester Park and Preserve, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is "in wheel." The female is a heteromorph.

27 SEP 2016 | OCPP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (mating pair, “in wheel“)

No. 7

A mating pair of Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Old Colchester Park and Preserve, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is "in wheel." The female is a heteromorph.

27 SEP 2016 | OCPP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (mating pair, “in wheel“)

No. 8

A mating pair of Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Old Colchester Park and Preserve, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is "in wheel." The female is a heteromorph.

27 SEP 2016 | OCPP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (mating pair, “in wheel“)

No. 9

A mating pair of Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Old Colchester Park and Preserve, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is "in wheel." The female is a heteromorph.

27 SEP 2016 | OCPP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (mating pair, “in wheel“)

No. 10

A mating pair of Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Old Colchester Park and Preserve, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is "in wheel." The female is a heteromorph.

27 SEP 2016 | OCPP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (mating pair, “in wheel“)

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Another new species discovered at JMAWR

September 20, 2016

A Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum) was spotted near Mulligan Pond at Jackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. As far as I know, this is the first official record of Blue-faced Meadowhawk at JMAWR.

This individual is a female andromorph, as indicated by her male-like coloration, lack of hamules, and terminal appendages.

A female Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Jackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is an andromorph.

15 SEP 2015 | JMAWR | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (female andromorph)

Unlike male Blue-faced Meadowhawks, most female faces are tan.

A female Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Jackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is an andromorph.

15 SEP 2015 | JMAWR | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (female andromorph)

This female is the only Blue-faced Meadowhawk I saw during a photowalk around Mulligan Pond — let’s hope she’s one of many more I didn’t see!

A female Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Jackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is an andromorph.

15 SEP 2015 | JMAWR | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (female andromorph)

Related Resource: Post update, published on 15 November 2016, documents another female Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly spotted at Mulligan Pond during Fall 2016.

Editor’s Notes: Swift Setwing dragonfly (Dythemis velox) was discovered on 24 June 2016 at Mulligan Pond, Jackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge — the first official record of Swift Setwing in Fairfax County, Virginia USA. For more information, see Swift Setwing dragonfly by Michael Powell and Making new friends by Walter Sanford.

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Time to mate

September 18, 2016

A mating pair of Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum ambiguum) was spotted at a vernal pool in Huntley Meadows Park (HMP). The vernal pool, currently dry, is the same one where teneral Blue-faced Meadowhawks were observed during late-May and early-June 2016.

This mating pair is “in wheel.” All dragonflies and damselflies have a 10-segmented abdomen, numbered from front to back: male dragonfly secondary genitalia, called hamules, are located in segments two and three (S2 and S3); female genitalia in segment eight (S8). Dragonflies form the mating wheel in order for their genitalia to connect during copulation.

A mating pair of Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is "in wheel." The female is an andromorph.

15 SEP 2016 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawks (mating pair, “in wheel“)

Some species of dragonflies display sexual dimorphism; females are polymorphic for a smaller subset of those species. Andromorph females are male-like in color; heteromorph females are duller in color than males.

Notice the female in this mating pair is an andromorph. Female andromorphs are less common than heteromorphs.

A mating pair of Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is "in wheel." The female is an andromorph.

15 SEP 2016 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawks (mating pair, “in wheel“)

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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