Posts Tagged ‘Antheraea polyphemus’

Scavenger hunt

March 21, 2017

The largest subject shown in the following photo is floating in a vernal pool. What is it? (Ignore the smaller “bonus bugs.”) The answer can be found by scavenging the posts in my photoblog. Need more clues?

31 MAY 2016 | Huntley Meadows Park | Signs of Wildlife

Post Update: The largest subject is one of the forewings from a Polyphemus Silkmoth (Antheraea polyphemus).

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Polyphemus Silkmoth

April 21, 2016

A Polyphemus Silkmoth (Antheraea polyphemus) was spotted along the Hike-Bike Trail at Huntley Meadows Park. Its wingspan is estimated to be approximately five inches from wing tip to wing tip.

A Polyphemus Silkmoth (Antheraea polyphemus) spotted along the Hike-Bike Trail at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

The moth seemed to be stunned but it was moving, albeit very slowly. Two quotes from Butterflies and Moths of North America may explain the moth’s sluggish behavior.

Life History: Adults emerge from their cocoons in the late afternoon, and mating occurs the same day from late evening to early morning. … Adult Food: Adults do not feed. Source Credit: Polyphemus moth.

A Polyphemus Silkmoth (Antheraea polyphemus) spotted along the Hike-Bike Trail at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

A Polyphemus Silkmoth (Antheraea polyphemus) spotted along the Hike-Bike Trail at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

A Polyphemus Silkmoth (Antheraea polyphemus) spotted along the Hike-Bike Trail at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

A Polyphemus Silkmoth (Antheraea polyphemus) spotted along the Hike-Bike Trail at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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