Posts Tagged ‘Asclepias incarnata’

Great Spangled Fritillary butterfly

February 13, 2016

The following photo shows a Great Spangled Fritillary butterfly (Speyeria cybele) spotted on 17 June 2015 at Huntley Meadows Park. This individual is nectaring on an unknown species of milkweed, possibly Swamp Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata).

A Great Spangled Fritillary butterfly (Speyeria cybele) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is feeding on an unknown species of milkweed, possibly Swamp Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata).

The milkweed was covered with tens of fritillaries, so it was almost impossible to get a clear shot of a single butterfly.

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

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Milkweed seed pods (covered by two types of insects)

January 11, 2014

The following gallery shows milkweed seed pods, probably Swamp Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata), spotted during photowalks through Huntley Meadows Park on 30 September- and 01 October 2013. Two types of insects are feeding on the milkweed: the  reddish-colored insects are Large Milkweed Bug nymphs (Oncopeltus fasciatus) eating the seeds; the yellow ones are Oleander Aphids (Aphis nerii) sucking plant juices.

Thanks to the following members of the BugGuide group on Facebook for their kind help in identifying the two insects and for providing interesting information about both insects: Sharon Magner; Arleigh Birchler; “SueandJohn KestrelHaven”; Joshua Stuart Rose; Betsy Betros; Ridlon Skip Kip Kiphart; and Ron Melder.

Copyright © 2014 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Viceroy butterflies (mating pair)

December 14, 2013

The following gallery shows a mating pair of Viceroy butterflies (Limenitis archippus) perching on a willow tree, one of the host plants for Viceroy caterpillars. This pair was spotted during a photowalk through Huntley Meadows Park on 26 September 2013.

Viceroy butterflies look similar to Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus).

It can be distinguished from the Monarch by its smaller size and the post-median black line that runs across the veins on the hindwing. Source Credit: Viceroy (butterfly), Wikipedia.

The following photograph shows a Monarch butterfly feeding on Swamp Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) at Huntley Meadows Park on 17 August 2012. Contrast the Viceroy butterflies (shown above) with the Monarch (shown below): the Viceroy butterflies have a post-median black line across their hindwings; the Monarch does not.

Monarch butterfly feeding on Swamp Milkweed

Copyright © 2013 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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