Posts Tagged ‘Blister Beetles’

New discoveries in 2017 (non-odonates)

December 30, 2017

I’m an equal opportunity photographer. Although I tend to focus on photographing odonates (dragonflies and damselflies) I will photograph anything interesting that catches my eye. This retrospective features non-odonate new finds for 2017.

House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus)

05 APR 2017 | The Beacon of Groveton | House Finch (male)

A House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) was spotted in the parking garage at the Beacon of Groveton, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male.

Eastern Hog-nosed Snake (Heterodon platirhinos)

An Eastern Hog-nosed Snake (Heterodon platirhinos) was spotted at Hemlock Overlook Regional Park (HORP), Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

Mayfly (Hexagenia sp.)

A mayfly (Hexagenia sp.) was spotted at Riverbend Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female subimago.

Northern Red-bellied Cooter (Pseudemys rubriventris)

A male Eastern Amberwing dragonfly (Perithemis tenera) was spotted perching on the nose of a Northern Red-bellied Cooter (Pseudemys rubriventris), at Mulligan Pond, Jackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

Blister beetle (Meloe sp.)

A blister beetle (Meloe sp.) was spotted at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA.

Wild Turkey feathers (Meleagris gallopavo)

A tail feather from a Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) was photographed in situ along Easy Road at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

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Blister beetle

November 30, 2017

During a photowalk along Easy Road at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, I noticed a type of beetle I didn’t recognize so I stopped to shoot a few photos. I consulted the expert members of the BugGuide Facebook group for help in identifying the unknown beetle.

Turns out it’s a member of the Family Meloidae (Blister Beetles). Several BugGuide members identified the insect as a species of “oil beetle” from the Genus Meloe. As its common names suggest, if this insect is disturbed then it releases an oil that can cause skin blisters. It’s as if chiggers and ticks weren’t enough of a nuisance — now I need to watch out for blister beetles too!

Editor’s Note: Thanks to BugGuide Facebook group members Dana Perantie, Brett Marshall, Shaun Delph, and Alonso Abugattas for help in identifying the beetle.

Related Resource: Oil Beetles, a blog post by Alonso Abugattas, Natural Resources Manager for Arlington County Parks, Virginia USA.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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