Posts Tagged ‘Chinese Mantid’

Almost perfect

March 17, 2017

Sometimes I get so focused on the subject of a photo that I don’t see the bigger picture. Although I recognize the problem, I can’t think of a simple solution.

04 OCT 2016 | Huntley Meadows Park | predators and prey

The preceding photo shows a Black and Yellow Argiope (Argiope aurantia) spider spotted at Huntley Meadows Park; a Common Green Darner dragonfly (Anax junius) is trapped in the spider web. I was so focused on getting a shot of the spider in a good position relative to the dragonfly that I never noticed the Chinese Mantid (Tenodera sinensis sinensis) on the right side of the photo. That is, until I returned home.

Notice that I clipped one of the mantid’s legs on the left side of its body (right edge of the photo). That’s the sort of thing that drives me crazy! If I had seen the mantid then I would have recomposed the shot in order to capture all three insects completely. Oh well, another hard lesson learned about wildlife photography.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

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Chinese Mantis ootheca

January 20, 2016

Another insect ootheca was spotted at a vernal pool located near the terminus of the Hike-Bike TrailHuntley Meadows Park. This is a Chinese Mantis (Tenodera sinensis) egg case, as indicated by the distinctive roundish shape of the ootheca. Chinese Mantis is a non-native species.

An insect ootheca spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This is a Chinese Mantis (Tenodera sinensis) egg case.

14 JAN 2016 | Huntley Meadows Park | Chinese Mantis ootheca

The Backstory: It was my good fortune to observe a controlled burn at Huntley Meadows Park on 14 January 2016. One of the target fields is located near the “accidental vernal pool,” my nickname for one of several vernal pools at the end of the Hike-Bike Trail. While I was in the neighborhood, I decided to look around for Autumn Meadowhawks in the hope of extending the state record late-date for dragonflies. Although I didn’t see any dragonflies, I spotted another Chinese Mantis egg case located near two other oothecae observed on 03 January.

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Oothecae

January 10, 2016

A couple of insect oothecae (sing. ootheca) were spotted while searching for Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies at a vernal pool located near the terminus of the Hike-Bike Trail, Huntley Meadows Park.

An insect ootheca spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This may be a mantis egg case.

03 JAN 2016 | Huntley Meadows Park | insect ootheca (egg case)

These oothecae may be mantis egg cases.

An insect ootheca spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This may be a mantis egg case.

03 JAN 2016 | Huntley Meadows Park | insect ootheca (egg case)

Post Update: Several members of the BugGuide Facebook group confirmed that these are in fact mantis egg cases. Group member Beatriz Moisset identified the species as Chinese Mantis (Tenodera sinensis), as indicated by the distinctive roundish shape of the oothecae. Chinese Mantis is a non-native species.

Introduced from China in 1896 to combat pests. It outcompetes many of the native preying mantises, which are in decline. Source Credit: Species Tenodera sinensis – Chinese Mantis, BugGuide.

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Chinese Mantid (eating a katydid)

November 4, 2013

I spotted a Chinese Mantid (Tenodera sinensis sinensis) along the boardwalk that goes through the central wetland area at Huntley Meadows Park. I stopped to shoot some photos, shown below, before continuing my photowalk.

Chinese Mantid (Tenodera sinensis sinensis) Chinese Mantid (Tenodera sinensis sinensis)

When I walked past the same spot a while later, I noticed the mantid had moved into the vegetation beside the boardwalk and was eating a Handsome Meadow Katydid (Orchelimum pulchellum). It was a brutal scene to watch, but I was compelled to take a few pictures!

Chinese Mantid (Tenodera sinensis sinensis)

Special thanks to Kim Phillips, Small Wonders, for identifying the katydid!

Copyright © 2013 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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