Posts Tagged ‘Diptic’

Diptics: Feathered friends of Huntley Meadows Park

January 27, 2012

The following gallery of four-panel diptychs features several photos of birds spotted during a photowalk through Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. Shown clockwise from the upper-left panel: Red-bellied Woodpecker (adult male); Great Blue Heron; Ring-billed Gull; and Mallard (female).

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Tech Tips: The preceding composite images were created using Apple “Aperture,” Adobe “Photoshop,” and “Diptic” app for Apple iOS mobile devices. For details, see “Advanced technique for creating Diptic ‘photo tiles’” (one of my recent Posterous posts). The border is five (5) pixels wide, rather than my usual preference of 10 pixels.

Copyright © 2012 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Diptics: Henry Moore Sundial Sculpture

January 23, 2012

The following gallery of four-panel diptychs features several photos of the Henry Moore Sundial Sculpture, Sundial Plaza, Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum, Chicago, Illinois USA. The sculpture is a type of sundial that is sometimes referred to as a “bowstring” equatorial sundial. See also an annotated photo of the sculpture that illustrates how a “bowstring” equatorial sundial is simply a reduced model of the Earth.

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Tech Tips: The preceding composite images were created using Apple “Aperture,” Adobe “Photoshop,” and “Diptic” app for Apple iOS mobile devices. For details, see “Advanced technique for creating Diptic ‘photo tiles’” (one of my recent Posterous posts). The border is five (5) pixels wide, rather than my usual preference of 10 pixels.

Copyright © 2012 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Diptics: University of Colorado Boulder

January 21, 2012

For more than a decade, I was actively involved with several K-13 education outreach initiatives of the American Meteorological Society. I was fortunate to be able to visit Boulder, Colorado USA for several in-service training workshops for science teachers. We stayed at Kittredge Complex, University of Colorado, for every workshop.

The following gallery of three-panel diptychs features several photos of the University of Colorado Boulder campus. Shown clockwise from the top: Kittredge Complex, with a spectacular view of the Flatirons in the background (part of the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains); the John Garrey Tippit Memorial Sundial, an equatorial sundial; and the Colorado Scale Model Solar System (notice my reflection and the Fiske Planetarium and Science Center behind me).

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Tech Tips: The preceding composite images were created using Apple “Aperture,” Adobe “Photoshop,” and “Diptic” app for Apple iOS mobile devices. For details, see “Advanced technique for creating Diptic ‘photo tiles’” (one of my recent Posterous posts). The border of Photos 1 and 3 is five (5) pixels; 10 pixels for Photos 2 and 4.

Copyright © 2012 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Diptics: "Bowstring" equatorial sundials

January 19, 2012

The following gallery of four-panel diptychs features photos of two “bowstring” equatorial sundial sculptures: 1) the Robert Adzema Hyatt Regency Jersey City Sundial, Jersey City, New Jersey USA, a combination “bowstring” equatorial sundial, noon mark solar calendar, and horizontal sundial (shown in the two upper panels); and 2) the Henry Moore Sundial Sculpture, Sundial Plaza, Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum, Chicago, Illinois USA (shown in the two lower panels).

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Tech Tips: The preceding composite images were created using Apple “Aperture,” Adobe “Photoshop,” and “Diptic” app for Apple iOS mobile devices. For details, see “Advanced technique for creating Diptic ‘photo tiles’” (one of my recent Posterous posts). The border is five (5) pixels wide, rather than my usual preference of 10 pixels.

Photos © Copyright 2012 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Diptics: Freezing rain event

December 29, 2011

I went for a short photowalk to photograph a freezing rain event that occurred overnight January 17-18, 2011, in Alexandria, Virginia USA. The following three- and four-panel diptychs were created using Apple Aperture and Diptic app for Apple iOS mobile devices.

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Here is a link to 18JAN2011_freezing-rain, one of my Google Picasa Web Albums, featuring all of the photos I shot soon after the weather event ended.

Teacher Tips: What is freezing rain? For a graphic explanation, see “How winter storms bring rain, ice and snow,” an interactive online article from the USA TODAY Weather Book by meteorologist Jack Williams. See also, “Snowflakes – A Thematic Approach (A Flurry of Interdisciplinary Ideas for Teachers)” perfect for enriching/extending everyday instruction during the winter season.

Photos © Copyright 2011 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Advanced technique for creating Diptic "photo tiles"

December 27, 2011

I like to use Apple Aperture to prepare ready-made “photo tiles” that are the perfect size to add to the panels in a Diptic layout. That said, some photos can’t be cropped to a size of say 1024 x 1024 pixels square without losing critical parts of the photo. Here’s a solution that is both simple and elegant — it’s called “round-tripping.”

I set Aperture’s “Export” preferences to hand-off a copy of an image file to an extrnal photo editor. I’m using Adobe Photoshop, but a much less expensive application such as ImageWell works too. I selected an image in my Aperture Library (see Photo 1 of 3, below), chose the Crop tool and “Square” Aspect Ratio, and selected an area that is 1723 x 1723 pixels square (see Photo 2 of 3, below). From the Aperture menu bar, I selected Photos > Edit with Adobe Photoshop…; Photoshop opened and I changed the image size to 1024 x 1024 pixels square. From the Photoshop menu bar, I selected File > Save; voila, the re-sized image appeared in my Aperture Library (round-trip completed)! Finally, I exported the re-sized photo from Aperture as usual (see Photo 3 of 3, below). Now the photo tile is ready for use in a Diptic diptych. Simple, huh? Really, it’s simpler than it sounds and best of all, there’s none of the loss in image quality that would occur by opening/editing/saving a photo in two-or-more applications. Now that’s cool!

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Tech Tips: When cropping a selected area from a photo that will be re-sized, be sure the dimensions of the selected area are larger than the intended dimensions of the re-sized version. Otherwise you may see “jaggies” in the final image.

Photos © Copyright 2011 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Common Whitetail: two- and three-panel diptychs

December 7, 2011

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The preceding gallery shows diptychs of Common Whitetail skimmer dragonflies (Libellula lydia) spotted during several photowalks. These individuals are female, as indicated by their brown bodies and mid-wing brownish-black bands that do not go edge-to-edge on translucent wings. (Males have a white abdomen and mid-wing brownish-black bands that go edge-to-edge on translucent wings.)

The diptychs (shown above), entitled “Whitetails Whose Tails Aren’t White,” were created using Aperture and Diptic app for Apple iOS mobile devices.

Related Resources:

See full-size versions of the photos used to create the preceding diptychs of dragonflies, arranged in reverse chronological order.

The following gallery shows four-panel diptychs of both male- and female Common Whitetail dragonflies.

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Photos © Copyright 2011 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Swallowtail butterfly: three- and four-panel diptychs

December 3, 2011

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The preceding gallery shows diptychs of an Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly (Papilio glaucus) feeding on Butterfly Weed (Asclepias tuberosa), a species of milkweed. This battle-scarred individual is missing one of his tails and a few chunks of its wings.

The diptychs (shown above), appropriately entitled “Catch a Tiger by the Tail,” were created using Aperture and Diptic  app for Apple iOS mobile devices. I still can’t decide whether I prefer a black- or white border — what do you think?

Related Resources:

Photos © Copyright 2011 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Another diptych of dragonflies

November 29, 2011

The following composite image, known as a diptych, was created using Diptic app for Apple iOS mobile devices. The diptych shows Great Blue Skimmer dragonflies (Libellula vibrans) spotted during photowalks through Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

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In order to create a “Hi-Res” Diptic (resolution = 2048 x 2048 pixels) like the one shown above, I used Apple Aperture to crop photo tiles from the source images in the following sizes: 1024 x 1024 pixels (square); 1024 H x 2048 W pixels. Next, I used iTunes to sync the photo tiles to my iPad. Finally, I launched Diptic, selected the photo tiles, and added black and white borders with a width of 10 pixels.

The following workflow was used to crop the photo tiles in Aperture:

  1. Choose a photo to edit. From the menu bar, select Photos/Duplicate Version.
  2. Select the new version of the photo.
  3. Select “Crop Tool” and drag a selection area on the image — don’t worry about the size of the area. Note that the “Master Aspect Ratio” of the Master Version is shown in the Crop Tool HUD; do not change the aspect ratio. (Under unusual circumstances, you may need to select “Do Not Constrain.”)
  4. Under the “Adjustments” tab, select “Crop.”
  5. Enter values for the new height and width, in pixels.
  6. Click-and-drag the crop selection box to desired position.
  7. From the menu bar, select File/Export/Version…; save file to desired location.

Photo © Copyright 2011 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Diptychs of Diptych Sundials

March 18, 2011

 

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Like “Drawing Hands,” the lithograph by M. C. Escher featuring one hand drawing another, I thought it would be interesting to create diptych photo collages using images of diptych sundials. Since I don’t have access to a collection of diptych sundials, I decided to take advantage of the laws related to intellectual property that allow liberal use of copyrighted materials for educational purposes: I repurposed several photos of diptych sundials from the National Maritime Museum for a mini-lesson on diptychs and diptych sundials. The diptychs (shown above) were created using Diptic app.

Terminology:

According to the Apple OS X “Dictionary” widget, a diptych is:

  1. a painting, esp. an altarpiece, on two hinged wooden panels that may be closed like a book.
  2. an ancient writing tablet consisting of two hinged leaves with waxed inner sides.

The British Sundial Society Glossary definition of a diptych sundial is as follows:

a portable (pocket) dial in which a vertical and horizontal dial are hinged together, and a common cord gnomon running between them also ensures that they open to a right angle [90 degrees]. [Diptych sundials are] latitude specific.

Related Resources:

Editor’s Note: I currently serve as chairperson of the North American Sundial Society (NASS) Education Committee. Educators interested in exploring ways to use sundials to enhance and/or enrich classroom instruction are encouraged to contact me.


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