Posts Tagged ‘Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly’

Time series: Purple Milkweed (Parts 3, 4)

March 18, 2019

Purple Milkweed (Asclepias purpurascens) flowers were photographed on 06 and 10 June 2016 near a large vernal pool at Huntley Meadows Park in Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

Kevin Munroe, former park manager at Huntley Meadows, designated Purple Milkweed as a “plant of interest” due to the fact that it is officially a rare plant species in the state of Virginia (S2).

Part 3

These plants are covered with ants, lots of ants!

Later, a single Great Spangled Fritillary butterfly (Speyeria cybele) was feeding on the same milkweed plant, along with lots of ants.

Part 4

Lots of Great Spangled Fritillary butterflies (Speyeria cybele) were observed feeding on the milkweed. The next two photos show the same individual in two poses.

The proboscis, a specialized structure that enables butterflies to siphon liquids from flowers, is shown clearly in the next two photos.

An Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly (Papilio glaucus) was feeding on another cluster of milkweed flowers. Eastern Tiger Swallowtail is the State Insect of Virginia. Really, who knew there are official state insects?

The last photo is my favorite in both galleries.

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Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Warming up

June 3, 2017

Faithful followers of my photoblog know I’m all about the odonates, that is, dragonflies and damselflies. But hey, I’m an equal opportunity wildlife photographer so when the ode-hunting starts slowly — as it did on this day — I like to “warm up” by shooting a few photos of anything that catches my eye.

03 MAY 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (male)

Like this Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly (Papilio glaucus) that was spotted along Pope’s Head Creek at Hemlock Overlook Regional Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Beautiful butterflies can be ugly!

February 9, 2017

Butterflies are beautiful, right? Usually. And they feed on beautiful flowers, right? Not always, as shown below.

An Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly (Papilio glaucus) spotted at Accotink Bay Wildlife Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, feeding on scat.

20 MAY 2016 | ABWR | Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (male)

An Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly (Papilio glaucus) was spotted along Great Blue Heron Trail at Accotink Bay Wildlife Refuge (ABWR), Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, feeding on mineral salts in scat (possibly raccoon).

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly (female)

April 13, 2016

An Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly (Papilio glaucus) was spotted during a photowalk at Huntley Meadows Park on 11 April 2016. This individual is a female, as indicated by the blue and orange markings on the lower edge of her hindwings, shown prominently in the following photograph of the butterfly’s ventral side.

An Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly (Papilio glaucus) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female, sheltering from strong wind.

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail females are polymorphic: a yellow morph, like this one; and a dark morph. This beauty was perching near the ground, where she seemed to be sheltering from strong wind.

An Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly (Papilio glaucus) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female, sheltering from strong wind.

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly (female)

February 6, 2014

The preceding gallery features photos of an Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterfly (Papilio glaucus) feeding on flowers at the Pollinator Garden, Meadowood Recreation Area, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. Please look at the full-size versions of these images in order to fully appreciate the rich coloration of the butterfly and flowers.

This individual is a female, as indicated by the blue and orange markings on the lower edge of its hindwings. Eastern Tiger Swallowtail females are polymorphic: a yellow morph, like this one; and a dark morph.

Tiger Swallowtail is the State Insect of Virginia. Really, who knew there are official state insects?

Copyright © 2014 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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