Posts Tagged ‘exuvia’

Stonefly exuvia

March 20, 2019

A Stonefly (Order Plecoptera) exuvia was spotted clinging to the boat ramp at Riverbend Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This specimen is approximately 1.5 inches in length.

28 JUN 2017 | Riverbend Park | Stonefly (Order Plecoptera) exuvia

Now I know the identity of the unknown species of aquatic insect that photobombed my photographs of Harpoon Clubtail (Phanogomphus descriptus) and Lancet Clubtail (Phanogomphus exilis), taken at another location a few weeks before the preceding photo.

Related Resources

Credits

Sincere thanks to Jacklyn Gautsch and Graham Floyd, members of the BugGuide Facebook group, for help in identifying this exuvia.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

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More composite images: P. obscurus exuvia

February 6, 2019

The following focus-stacked composite images show dorsal- and ventral views of the exuvia from a Common Sanddragon (Progomphus obscuruslarva that was collected and reared by Bob Perkins.

Here are some personal observations after examining the specimen carefully.

The front- and middle legs block the mentum (prementum). This specimen is a good candidate for rehydrating the exuvia and reposing its legs.

Related Resource: Composite image: Progomphus obscurus exuvia.

Tech Tips

Six (6) photos were used to create the first focus stack; seven (7) photos were used for the second. A single focus point was positioned over select anatomical features, working from back-to-front; photos were taken at each point of interest.

The following equipment was used to shoot all of the photographs for the two focus-stacked composite images, shown above: Canon EOS 5D Mark II digital camera, in manual mode; Kenko 20mm macro automatic extension tubeCanon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro lens (set for manual focus); and Canon MT-26EX-RT Macro Twin Lite set for “Master” mode, and several external flashes set for “Slave” mode including Canon 580 EX- and Canon 580EX II Speedlites and a Godox TT685C Thinklite TTL Flash fitted with a Lastolite Ezybox Speed-Lite 2 flash modifier.

Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to create the focus-stacked composite images, as well as spot-heal and sharpen the final output.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Composite image: Progomphus obscurus exuvia

February 4, 2019

The following focus-stacked composite image shows the exuvia from a Common Sanddragon (Progomphus obscurus) larva that was collected and reared by Bob Perkins.

I have 10s, maybe 100s, of Common Sanddragon exuviae in my collection, but have never seen one cleaner than this beautiful specimen. I didn’t realize P. obscurus larvae are so hairy!

Related Resource: More composite images: P. obscurus exuvia.

Tech Tips

11 photos were used to create the focus stack. A single focus point was positioned over select anatomical features, working from back-to-front; photos were taken at each point of interest.

The following equipment was used to shoot the preceding composite image: Canon EOS 5D Mark II digital camera, in manual mode; Canon MP-E 65mm Macro lens (set for f/11 at 3x); and Canon MT-26EX-RT Macro Twin Lite set for “Master” mode, and several external flashes set for “Slave” mode including Canon 580 EX- and Canon 580EX II Speedlites and a Godox TT685C Thinklite TTL Flash fitted with a Lastolite Ezybox Speed-Lite 2 flash modifier.

Auto power-off was disabled for the camera and all external flash units.

Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to create the focus stack, as well as spot-heal and sharpen the final output.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

More test shots: Ladona deplanata exuvia

January 16, 2019

As promised, this blog post features more test shots of the exuvia from a Blue Corporal dragonfly (Ladona deplanata) larva/nymph collected and reared by Bob Perkins.

All of the images in this photo set (including the dorsal view featured in my last blog post) are underexposed, except for the following photo: this photo looked overexposed on my camera LCD; the rest of the photos looked fine.

In reality, the photos were underexposed because I didn’t compensate for the effect of the extension tubes on exposure — a problem that was probably caused/exacerbated by switching the ISO from my usual setting of “A” (Auto) to 200. This photo turned out to have the best exposure because the flash power was several stops higher than the rest of the photos in the set. Remember the exposure triangle. (See Tech Tips/Related Resources, below.)

Oh, so close to a good shot! The left front leg blocks part of the face-head, and that doesn’t work for me. This specimen is a good candidate for rehydrating the exuvia and reposing its legs.

Related Resource: Test shot: Ladona deplanata exuvia.

Tech Tips

The following equipment was used to shoot the preceding photo: Fujifilm X-T1 digital camera; Fujifilm MCEX-11 and MCEX-16 extension tubes; Fujinon XF80mm macro lensGodox XProF TTL Wireless Flash Trigger for Fujifilm camerasGodox TT685F Thinklite TTL Flash for Fujifilm CamerasGodox TT685C Thinklite TTL Flash for Canon Cameras fitted with a Lastolite Ezybox Speed-Lite 2 flash modifier; and Canon 580EX II Speedlite mounted on a Godox X1R-C TTL Wireless Flash Trigger Receiver for Canon.

Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to spot-heal and sharpen the final output.

Tech Tips/Related Resources

What you should remember, as a rule of thumb, is that by the time you get close to magnifications of 1:1, the effective f-stop of the lens will have changed by about 2 stops. That means you, or your camera, are needing to compensate for this with a higher ISO, or a shutter speed that’s 4-times longer than you’d need without those tubes.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Focus-stacking with CamRanger

January 7, 2019

This blog post reports the result of more experimentation with completely automated focus stacking using CamRanger.

25 photos were used to create this focus-stacked composite image of an Eastern Least Clubtail dragonfly (Stylogomphus albistylus) exuvia from an odonate nymph that Bob Perkins collected and reared.

I own two Canon macro lenses: a Canon MP-E 65mm Macro lens; and a Canon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro lens.

The MP-E 65mm macro is manual focus only, and cannot be used with CamRanger to create automated focus-stacked composite images.

In contrast, the EF100mm macro can be used with CamRanger to create automated focus stacks. In order to increase the magnification of the EF100mm macro, I used the lens in combination with three Kenko macro automatic extension tubes: 12mm; 20mm; and 36mm.

Pros and Cons

My goal was to create a tight close-up showing the face-head only. On one hand I failed to achieve my goal due to less maximum magnification using the combination of EF100mm macro lens and extension tubes rather than the MP-E 65mm macro lens.

On the other hand I shot 25 photos in a little more than four minutes*, with the focus plane shifted in small increments from front to back along the subject — all without touching the camera after setting the initial focus point. That’s what I call success!

Related Resources

Tech Tips

The following equipment was used to shoot all of the photographs for the focus-stacked composite image of the exuvia: CamRanger hardware, and iOS app running on my iPad mini (with retina display); Canon EOS 5D Mark II digital camera, in manual mode; Kenko macro automatic extension tubes (12mm, 20mm, and 36mm)Canon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro lens (set for manual focus); and Canon MT-26EX-RT Macro Twin Lite set for “Master” mode, and several external flashes set for “Slave” mode including Canon 580 EX- and Canon 580EX II Speedlites and a Godox TT685C Thinklite TTL Flash fitted with a Lastolite Ezybox Speed-Lite 2 flash modifier.

Auto power-off was disabled for the camera and all external flash units. CamRanger was set for a *10-second delay between shots in order to allow sufficient time for the lens to change focus automatically, the camera rig to settle, and the flash units to power-cycle.

Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to create the focus-stacked composite image, as well as spot-heal and sharpen the final output.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Five-flash studio macro photography rig

January 4, 2019

This blog post is a follow-on to a previous post entitled Studio macro photography rig. As you can see, my four-flash rig has been updated to include a fifth flash: a Godox TT685C Thinklite TTL Flash fitted with a Lastolite Ezybox Speed-Lite 2 flash modifier.

Although it isn’t shown clearly in the following quick-and-dirty photo taken with my iPad 3, both the Godox TT685C and a Canon 580EX II Speedlite are mounted on the crossbar of my Vanguard Alta Pro 263AB 100 Aluminum Alloy Tripod. Look closely — the tiny subject (a Stylogomphus albistylus exuvia) is positioned in the far-left corner of the white posing platform, in front of the Lastolite flash modifier.

The Lastolite flash modifier features a two-layer system of diffusers that provides beautiful soft light: the white square you can see on the outside of the collapsible box and another white square that you can’t see, located halfway between the flash head and the front of the box.

Another addition to the rig is my new 3 Legged Thing QR11-LC Universal L-Bracket. (Note: The camera body blocks your view of the L-bracket.) The L-bracket enabled me to mount the camera in portrait mode quickly and securely. Although the Manfrotto 405 Pro Digital Geared Head can be adjusted to position my camera rig in portrait mode, the heavy camera-lens-flash combo is unstable and can tip over easily.

New gear used for studio macro photography.

By the way, in case you looked at the preceding photo and wondered “What’s up with the crazy crop?” I used Photoshop to conceal some of the clutter in my kitchen. I set up my macro photo rig in the kitchen because it’s the largest uncarpeted area in my tiny apartment. Padded carpet is a poor surface for macro photography — the field of view from a tripod-mounted camera-lens-flash combo shifts noticeably (and unacceptably) as one moves around the rig.

More Tech Tips: A complete description of all of the equipment used in my studio macro photography rig is provided in a previous blog post entitled Studio macro photography rig.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Top 10 Photos of 2018

January 2, 2019

The following gallery shows 18 finalists for my “Top 10 Photos of 2018.” The photos are presented in reverse-chronological order beginning in September 2018 and ending in February 2018.

No. 1

20 SEP 2018 | Fairfax County, VA | Pandora Sphinx moth

No. 2

23 AUG 2018 | Occoquan Bay NWR | Osprey (male, plus prey)

No. 3

No. 4

No. 5

No. 6

05 JUL 2018 | Fairfax County, VA | Sable Clubtail (female)

No. 7

No. 8

No. 9

12 JUN 2018 | Fairfax County, VA | Sable Clubtail (male)

No. 10

08 JUN 2018 | Fairfax County, VA | Sable Clubtail (male)

No. 11

06 JUN 2018 | Northern Virginia | Gray Petaltail (male)

No. 12

No. 13

No. 14

No. 15

No. 16

No. 17

No. 18

Editor’s Note: The following location codes are used in some photo captions, shown above.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

More test shots: Stylogomphus albistylus exuvia

December 21, 2018

This blog post features another focus-stacked composite image of an Eastern Least Clubtail dragonfly (Stylogomphus albistylus) exuvia from an odonate nymph that Bob Perkins collected and reared.

11 photos were used to create this focus stack. My camera is set for spot focus, meaning one-area focus for each photo. A single focus point was positioned manually somewhere on the face-head in all 11 photos.

From this viewpoint, the large, dish-shaped antennae remind me of wooden spoons (with short handles).

This is the first time I shot some photos in portrait mode using my new 3 Legged Thing QR11-LC Universal L-Bracket (Orange) mounted on my Canon 5D Mark II DSLR camera. I’m sold!

3 Legged Thing QR11-LC Universal L-Bracket (Orange).

Related Resources

Tech Tips

The following equipment was used to shoot all of the photographs for the focus-stacked composite image of the exuvia: Canon EOS 5D Mark II digital camera, in manual mode; Kenko 20mm macro automatic extension tubeCanon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro lens (set for manual focus); and Canon MT-26EX-RT Macro Twin Lite set for “Master” mode, and several external flashes set for “Slave” mode including Canon 580 EX- and Canon 580EX II Speedlites and a Godox TT685C Thinklite TTL Flash fitted with a Lastolite Ezybox Speed-Lite 2 flash modifier.

Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to create the focus-stacked composite image, as well as spot-heal and sharpen the final output.

I used my Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150 superzoom camera and a handheld Canon 580EX Speedlite fitted with a Lastolite Ezybox Speed-Lite 2 flash modifier to shoot the photo of my Canon 5D Mark II.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Test shots: Stylogomphus albistylus exuvia

December 19, 2018

Bob Perkins collected and reared an Eastern Least Clubtail dragonfly (Stylogomphus albistylus) nymph. This blog post features two focus-stacked composite images of the exuvia from the odonate nymph.

Nine photos were used to create the first focus stack. This small specimen features several easy-to-recognize field marks including large, dish-shaped antennae, distinctive color bands on the legs, lateral spines on abdominal segments eight and nine (S8-9), and terminal appendages tipped with a lighter color.

12 photos were used to create the last focus stack. This individual might be a male, as indicated by what appear to be vestigial hamules on the ventral side of the specimen.

Tech Tips

The following equipment was used to shoot all of the photographs for the two focus-stacked composite images, shown above: Canon EOS 5D Mark II digital camera, in manual mode; Kenko 20mm macro automatic extension tubeCanon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro lens (set for manual focus); and Canon MT-26EX-RT Macro Twin Lite set for “Master” mode, and several external flashes set for “Slave” mode including Canon 580 EX- and Canon 580EX II Speedlites and a Godox TT685C Thinklite TTL Flash fitted with a Lastolite Ezybox Speed-Lite 2 flash modifier.

Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to create the focus-stacked composite images, as well as spot-heal and sharpen the final output.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Test shots: Unknown odonate exuvia

December 12, 2018

An odonate exuvia from an unknown species of dragonfly (Anisoptera) was collected by a good friend during April 2018 in Vienna, Austria.

Based upon the crenulations along the margins of the labium, I think the specimen is a member of either the Family Corduliidae (Emeralds) or Family Libellulidae (Skimmers). I need to clean the anal pyramid for a clearer look at the terminal appendages in order to identify the family.

One-off

The first photo is a “one-off,” that is, not a composite image. The focus point is on the face mask/head; the rest of the subject is in soft focus.

Anisoptera (unknown species) | exuvia (face/head-dorsal)

Composite images

The next two “photos” are three-layer focus-stacked composite images: For each image, the focus point is on the face mask/head in the first photo; the thorax in the second photo; and the terminal appendages in the third photo. The entire body of the exuvia is acceptably in focus, including most of the legs.

The specimen has dorsal hooks on some abdominal segments (exact number unknown without closer examination), and lateral spines on abdominal segments eight and nine (S8-9).

Anisoptera (unknown species) | exuvia (dorsal)

I think this individual might be a female, as indicated by what appears to be a rudimentary ovipositor that is visible on the ventral side of abdominal segment nine (S9).

Anisoptera (unknown species) | exuvia (ventral)

Post Update

Sincere thanks to Benoit Guillon and Christophe Brochard, members of the “Dragonflies and Damselflies – Worldwide Odonata” Facebook group, for kindly identifying this specimen as an exuvia from a Downy Emerald dragonfly (Cordulia aenea). Downy Emerald is a member of the Family Corduliidae (Emeralds).

The following photo shows a plastic container of 20 Downy Emerald dragonfly (Cordulia aenea) exuviae, collected by a good friend during April 2018 in Vienna, Austria. Thanks to field marks shared by Benoit Guillon, I was able to quickly determine that all of the exuviae are the same species as the specimen featured in this blog post.

Related Resource: Cordulia aenea: exuviae (1/2), by Benoit Guillon.

Tech Tips

The following equipment was used to shoot all of the preceding photographs: Canon EOS 5D Mark II digital camera, in manual mode; Kenko 20mm macro automatic extension tubeCanon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro lens (set for manual focus); and Canon MT-26EX-RT Macro Twin Lite set for “Master” mode, and several external flashes set for “Slave” mode including Canon 580 EX- and Canon 580EX II Speedlites and a Godox TT685C Thinklite TTL Flash fitted with a Lastolite Ezybox Speed-Lite 2 flash modifier.

Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to create the two focus-stacked composite images, as well as spot-heal and sharpen the final output.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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