Posts Tagged ‘Familiar Bluet damselfly’

Familiar Bluet damselfly (male)

March 27, 2019

A Familiar Bluet damselfly (Enallagma civile) was spotted during a photowalk at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA.

This individual is a male, as indicated by the pattern of coloration on his abdomen. Female E. civile is polymorphic, including two morphs: tan; and blue. Female blue morphs have a different pattern of black and blue markings on their abdomen than males of the same species.

21 SEP 2016 | Occoquan Bay NWR | Familiar Bluet (male)

Related Resource: Familiar Bluet damselfly (female).

Credits

Sincere thanks to Mike Boatwright and Michael Moore for verifying my tentative identification of the damselfly. Mike Boatwright is the founder and administrator of the Virginia Odonata Facebook group; Dr. Michael Moore is a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at University of Delaware and odonate expert extraordinaire. Michael’s new Web site is a treasure trove of helpful resources.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

You look Familiar

August 3, 2018

A Familiar Bluet damselfly (Enallagma civile) was spotted during a photowalk along one of many trails at Occoquan Regional Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

08 JUN 2018 | Occoquan Regional Park | Familiar Bluet (male)

This individual is a male, as indicated by the pattern of coloration on his abdomen. Female E. civile is polymorphic, including two morphs: tan; and blue. Female blue morphs have a different pattern of black and blue markings on their abdomen than males of the same species.

Editor’s Note

Sincere thanks to my good friend Mike Boatwright, administrator of the Virginia Odonata Facebook group, for verifying my tentative identification.

Related Resource: Familiar Bluet damselfly (female).

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Familiar Bluet damselfly (female)

February 2, 2018

A Familiar Bluet damselfly (Enallagma civile) was spotted near a drainage ditch at a remote location in Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female.

The damselfly appears to be eating a smaller black insect, possibly a spider.

Editor’s Note: Sincere thanks to Mike Boatwright for verifying my tentative identification of the damselfly.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Acceptable uncertainty

February 23, 2017

An unknown species of damselfly from the Family Coenagrionidae (Narrow-winged Damselflies) was spotted at the stormwater management pond located at Mason Neck West Park. This individual is a female, as indicated by her terminal appendages.

I thought the damselfly might be a mature female Rambur’s Forktail damselfly (Ischnura ramburii), based upon the fact that I’d seen an immature female Rambur’s Forktail on 03 October 2016 at the same location. I consulted the experts of the Northeast Odonata Facebook group for verification of my tentative identification.

It’s a female bluet, probably Familiar [Bluet] but it has a hint of a carina, so it might be Big [Bluet], but the eyespots look more like Familiar. Female Rambur’s does not have shoulder stripes. Source Credit: Dr. Michael Moore. Michael is an active contributor to the Dragonfly and Damselfly Field Guide and ID App.

Difficult though it may be for me to accept, sometimes it’s impossible to identify odonates with certainty based upon a single photograph. This is especially true for many species of female damselflies.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

New late-date for Familiar Bluet

November 26, 2016
A Familiar Bluet damselfly (Enallagma civile) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male.

18 NOV 2016 | Huntley Meadows Park | Familiar Bluet (male)

A Familiar Bluet damselfly (Enallagma civile) was spotted near a vernal pool located in Huntley Meadows Park. This individual is a male, as indicated by his black and blue coloration and by his terminal appendages.

A Familiar Bluet damselfly (Enallagma civile) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male.

18 NOV 2016 | Huntley Meadows Park | Familiar Bluet (male)

18 November is a new personal late-date for Familiar Bluet at Huntley Meadows Park. As it turns out, another male Familiar Bluet was spotted by Michael Powell on the same date at another location in the park. The record late-date for Familiar Bluet in the Commonwealth of Virginia is 27 December, set in 2015.

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Familiar Bluet damselfly (immature male)

October 20, 2015

Familiar Bluet damselfly (Enallagma civile) was spotted at Huntley Meadows Park (HMP). This individual is an immature male, as indicated by its terminal appendages and the blue pruinescence that is just beginning to appear on its body.

A Familiar Bluet damselfly (Enallagma civile) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is an immature male.

06 OCT 2015 | HMP | Familiar Bluet (immature male)

At this stage, male Familiar Bluets look similar to females.

Step 1. Be aware the same species of dragonfly may appear differently depending upon gender, age, and natural variation. Some species display sexual dimorphism; in contrast, both genders look virtually identical for some species. Finally, females of some species display polymorphism (also known as polychromatism). Source Credit: Five steps to the next level of dragonfly spotting.

Copyright © 2015 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

You look Familiar.

October 4, 2015

Do I know you? You look familiar. Like a Familiar Bluet damselfly (Enallagma civile), that is.

A Familiar Bluet damselfly (Enallagma civile) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male.

23 SEP 2015 | Huntley Meadows Park | Familiar Bluet (male)

This individual is a male, as indicated by its coloration and terminal appendages.

A Familiar Bluet damselfly (Enallagma civile) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male.

23 SEP 2015 | Huntley Meadows Park | Familiar Bluet (male)

Many American Bluets, members of the Pond Damsels Family of damselflies, can be difficult to identify, especially in the field. There are many species of bluets, most of them are blue, and many of them look similar. That being said, identification of bluet damselflies is relatively simple at Huntley Meadows Park. (Yay, another reason to love the park!)

The fact of the matter is you’re unlikely to see more than one or two of the blue bluets on the Friends of Huntley Meadows Park Odonata species list of damselflies, especially if you never venture beyond the boardwalk: Familiar Bluet (Enallagma civile); and Stream Bluet (Enallagma exsulans).

The two species look somewhat similar, but similar is not the same, as illustrated by the following composite image: Stream Bluet damselfly (spotted on 24 June 2015); Familiar Bluet damselfly (spotted on 23 September 2015). How many differences can you see?

A Stream Bluet damselfly (Enallagma exsulans) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male.

Composite image: Stream Bluet (male) versus Familiar Bluet (male).

Both species tend to be habitat specialists rather than habitat generalists: Familiar Bluet is the only blue bluet you’re likely to see in the central wetland area at Huntley Meadows Park; Stream Bluet is more likely to be found along some of the streams that flow through the park, such as Barnyard Run.

And then there’s the matter of timing, as shown by the Dragonflies of Loudoun calendar of adult flight periods for damselflies: 23 September is still prime time for Familiar Bluets; prime time for Stream Bluets ends in August. So if you see a beautiful blue damselfly at Huntley Meadows during September/October, then it’s almost certainly a male Familiar Bluet.

Now that you’re familiar with the who, what, where, and when of Familiar Bluets, why don’t you go find one before they’re gone? Look for them on aquatic vegetation close to the water.

Copyright © 2015 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Blues for “Bluets”

July 12, 2015

Regular readers of my photoblog know I love me some odonates! Mostly, that is. Many American Bluets, members of the Pond Damsels Family of damselflies, can be difficult to identify, especially in the field. There are many species of bluets, most of them are blue, and many of them look similar. Yes, sometimes I get the blues when trying to identify bluets — no wonder I lovingly refer to them as “damnselflies!”

Five species of bluets are listed on the Friends of Huntley Meadows Park Odonata species list of damselflies: Familiar Bluet (Enallagma civile); Big Bluet (Enallagma durum); Stream Bluet (Enallagma exsulans); Skimming Bluet (Enallagma geminatum); and Orange Bluet (Enallagma signatum).

Orange Bluets, named for their orange-and-black coloration, are easy to identify and relatively common in the central wetland area at the park.

The fact of the matter is you’re unlikely to see more than one or two of the blue bluets on the species list, so there should be no need to curse my little friends in frustration because you’re unable to identify them. Look closely at the pattern of blue-and-black markings on the abdomen of males and you should be able to easily differentiate the three species of bluets featured in this post. Identifying females can be a lot more challenging.

Familiar Bluet

In my experience, the only blue bluet you’re likely to see in the central wetland area at Huntley Meadows Park (HMP) is Familiar Bluet (Enallagma civile).

Familiar Bluet damselfly (male, in flight)

15 SEP 2014 | HMP | Familiar Bluet (male, in flight)

Stream Bluet

Stream Bluets (Enallagma exsulans) are relatively common along some of the streams that flow through Huntley Meadows Park, such as Barnyard Run.

A Stream Bluet damselfly (Enallagma exsulans) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male.

24 JUN 2015 | HMP | Stream Bluet (male)

It’s helpful to get shots of mating pairs in tandem, since males and females of the same species can look quite different.

A mating pair of Stream Bluet damselflies (Enallagma exsulans) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is in tandem.

10 JUL 2015 | HMP | Stream Bluets (mating pair, in tandem)

Female Stream Bluets are polymorphic, displaying either green or blue on the thorax. The green morph appears in the two photos of a mating pair of Stream Bluets featured in this post.

A mating pair of Stream Bluet damselflies (Enallagma exsulans) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is in tandem.

10 JUL 2015 | HMP | Stream Bluets (mating pair, in tandem)

Big Bluet

The author has never seen a Big Bluet damselfly (Enallagma durum) at Huntley Meadows Park. My theory is the wetlands at the park are the wrong habitat for Big Bluets.

Habitat Large sandy lakes and lower reaches of rivers, even extending into brackish estuaries. Source Credit: Paulson, Dennis (2011-12-19). Dragonflies and Damselflies of the East (Princeton Field Guides) (Kindle Locations 2156-2157). Princeton University Press. Kindle Edition.

It’s noteworthy that the only location where I have seen Big Bluets is Accotink Bay Wildlife Refuge (ABWR), and Ken Larsen’s photo of a Big Bluet (linked from the FoHMP Odonata species list) is from Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Are you seeing the same pattern I see? The common keyword between our Big Bluet spottings is “bay.” Unless someone can show me a photograph of a Big Bluet spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, I feel strongly it should be deleted from the FoHMP Odonata species list.

A Big Bluet damselfly (Enallagma durum) spotted at Accotink Bay Wildlife Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, shown eating an unknown insect.

17 SEP 2012 | ABWR | Big Bluet (male, eating prey)

The following poor quality photo is used to provide another illustration of the idea that it’s helpful to get shots of mating pairs in tandem, since males and females of the same species can look quite different. Female Big Bluets are polymorphic, displaying either brown or blue coloration. The brown morph is shown below.

A mating pair of Big Bluet damselflies (Enallagma durum) spotted at Accotink Bay Wildlife Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is in tandem.

10 SEP 2012 | ABWR | Big Bluet (mating pair, in tandem)

Related Resource: Dragonflies of Loudoun features a flight calendar for dragonflies and damselflies. Familiar Bluets are on the wing from July through September; Stream Bluets from May through August. Big Bluets aren’t listed. Hmmm, could it be because there aren’t any bays located in Loudoun County, Virginia?

Editor’s Note: The environment at Huntley Meadows Park may not be the ideal habitat for Skimming Bluet damselflies (Enallagma geminatum). The author has never seen a Skimming Bluet at the park, and the species isn’t linked from the FoHMP Odonata species list, suggesting Ken Larsen has never photographed one. If you have a photo of a Skimming Bluet at Huntley Meadows, then please contact me.

Copyright © 2015 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Familiar Bluet damselflies (males)

October 5, 2014

This post features photos of two damselflies spotted during recent photowalks at Huntley Meadows Park.

Familiar Bluet damselfly (Enallagma civile) is shown in the first photo. This individual is a male, in flight over the central wetland area.

Familiar Bluet damselfly (male, in flight)

15 September 2014

Question is, what type of damselfly is shown in the following photo?

Familiar Bluet damselfly (female)

28 September 2014

Would you believe it’s another Familiar Bluet damselfly? This individual is either an immature- or young male, as indicated by the blue pruinescence that is just beginning to appear on its body. At this stage, male Familiar Bluets look similar to females.

Thanks to the following members of the Northeast Odonata Facebook group for their kind assistance in identifying the species and gender of the damselfly shown in the preceding photo: Steve Price; and Ed Lam, author and illustrator of Damselflies of the Northeast.

Copyright © 2014 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Familiar Bluet damselflies (males)

October 22, 2012

A couple of Familiar Bluet damselflies (Enallagma civile) spotted in the central wetland area at Huntley Meadows Park. These individuals are males.

P1150587-rw2-ver2_apertureP1150584-rw2-ver2_apertureP1150532-rw2-ver3_aperture

Copyright © 2012 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com


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