Posts Tagged ‘Family Gomphidae (Clubtails)’

Exuviart

August 22, 2017

Regular readers of my blog remember when I coined the term “Odonart” and created an “Odonart Portfolio.”

I just coined a new term: “Exuviart.” Exuviart is a concatenation of two words: exuvia; and art. The following photographs are the first additions to the Exuviart wing of my Odonart Portfolio.


Unpublished Photo

An Eastern Amberwing dragonfly (Perithemis tenera) exuvia, from the Family Libellulidae (Skimmers), was collected from the Potomac River in Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

Whenever possible, I like to collect exuviae along with some of the vegetation that was the site for emergence. The vegetation helps to show scale. In this case, the small specimen is approximately 1.4 cm (~0.6″) in length and approximately 0.6 cm (~0.2″) in maximum width. I like the way the desiccated leaf retained its color and gained a velvety texture.

Tech Tips

The following equipment was used to shoot the preceding photograph: Canon EOS 5D Mark II DSLR; Canon EF100mm f/2.8 Macro lens plus Raynox DCR-250 close-up filter; Canon 580EX II Speedlite; Canon 580EX Speedlite; and a coiled six-foot Vello Off-Camera TTL Flash Cord for Canon Cameras. The specimen was staged on a piece of white plastic (12″ square, matte finish).


Published Photos

A Common Green Darner dragonfly (Anax junius) exuvia, from the Family Aeshnidae (Darners), was collected at Hidden Pond, Meadowood Recreation Area (MRA), Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

Tech Tips

The following equipment was used to shoot the preceding photograph: Canon EOS 5D Mark II digital camera, in manual mode; Canon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro lens (set for manual focus); Canon 580EX II external flash, off-camera, in manual mode; Canon 580EX external flash, off-camera, in manual mode; and a Yongnuo YN-622C-TX E-TTL II Wireless Flash Controller for Canon plus a two-pack of Yongnuo YN-622C II E-TTL Wireless Flash Transceivers for Canon.


A Cobra Clubtail dragonfly (Gomphurus vastus) exuvia, from the Family Gomphidae (Clubtails), was collected at Riverbend Park with permission from park staff.

Tech Tips

The following equipment was used to shoot the preceding photograph: Canon EOS 5D Mark II digital camera, in manual mode; Canon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro lens (set for manual focus) plus a Kenko 20mm macro automatic extension tube and Raynox DCR-250 close-up filter; Canon 580EX II external flash, off-camera, in manual mode; Canon 580EX external flash, off-camera, in manual mode; and a Yongnuo YN-622C-TX E-TTL II Wireless Flash Controller for Canon plus a two-pack of Yongnuo YN-622C II E-TTL Wireless Flash Transceivers for Canon.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Advertisements

Russet-tipped Clubtail (terminal appendages)

August 14, 2017

Male Russet-tipped Clubtail dragonflies (Stylurus plagiatus) have a larger, more colorful club than females of the same species, their hind wings are “indented,” and their terminal appendages are shaped differently. Compare and contrast the appearance of males and females by looking at the following annotated images.

Male

Male dragonflies have three terminal appendages, collectively called “claspers,” that are used to grab and hold female dragonflies during mating: an upper pair of cerci (“superior appendages”); and a lower unpaired epiproct (“inferior appendage”).

14 OCT 2016 | JMAWR | Russet-tipped Clubtail (male)

(See a full-size version of the original photo, without annotation.)

Notice the epiproct is a wide “plate” that spans both cerci, as shown in the full-size version of the preceding annotated image.

Female

All female dragonflies have a pair of cerci (superior appendages) that have little or no function. The hind wings of female clubtails are rounded.

21 AUG 2015 | Powhatan County, VA | Russet-tipped Clubtail (female)

(See a full-size version of the original photo, without annotation.)

The female Russet-tipped Clubtail dragonfly shown in the preceding image was spotted along the James River by my good friend Michael Boatwright, founder of the Virginia Odonata Facebook group. Sincere thanks to Mike for permission to use his photographs (background and inset).

Related Resources: Digital Dragonflies, presenting high-resolution digital scans of living dragonflies.

  • Genus Stylurus | Stylurus plagiatus | Russet-tipped Clubtail | male | top view
  • Genus Stylurus | Stylurus plagiatus | Russet-tipped Clubtail | female | top view
  • Genus Stylurus | Stylurus plagiatus | Russet-tipped Clubtail | female | side view

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Dragonhunters

August 4, 2017

Several male Dragonhunter dragonflies (Hagenius brevistylus) were spotted during photowalks along a mid-size rocky stream in Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

I think the first photo looks and feels like summer.

21 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Dragonhunter (male)

The next photo is my favorite in the set. Did you notice the male Blue-fronted Dancer damselfly (Argia apicalis) in the background?

21 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Dragonhunter (male)

I flushed the last Dragonhunter as I was walking along a path that leads to/from the stream. He flew to a perch on a tree limb overhead, posed for one photo, and flew toward the top of a nearby tree.

26 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Dragonhunter (male)

The Backstory

Winter is the longest season, that is, for odonate hunters. OK, I realize winter is three months like every other season, but it certainly seems longer! Winter is a good time for reflecting upon the last ode-hunting season and planning for the next one.

Last winter, I was thinking about new places to explore where I might see Dragonhunter dragonflies. Kevin Munroe, former manager at Huntley Meadows Park, told me about a hotspot for Dragonhunters along Bull Run in Manassas, Virginia. Manassas is a little farther from home than I am willing to travel, especially in heavy traffic. So I used Google Maps (satellite view) to work downstream from Manassas Battlefield Park until I found a location that seemed to have potential.

I had a hunch the new spot would be ideal habitat for Dragonhunters and other less common species of odonates. Turns out my hunch was right! In fact, I considered calling this post “Dragonhunchers” but decided to play it straight.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Adding a 16mm extension tube

August 2, 2017

Optics theory

The net effect of adding an extension tube between a lens and camera body is the “working distance” is decreased, that is, the distance from the front of the lens barrel to the subject is decreased. A smaller working distance means the same lens will focus closer to the subject, thereby increasing magnification.

The effect is greater at shorter focal lengths, as shown by the following table of magnification for the two extension tubes sold by Fujifilm USA.

Table courtesy Fujifilm USA.

Theory into practice

An Eastern Ringtail dragonfly (Erpetogomphus designatus) was spotted along the Potomac River at Riverbend Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female, as indicated by her terminal appendages and rounded hind wings.

Both photos in this set were taken using my Fujifilm X-T1 digital camera, Fujinon XF55-200mm zoom lens plus a “Fotasy” brand 16mm extension tube, and Fujifilm EF-X500 shoe mount flash. The lens was set for a focal length of 200mm (~300mm, 35mm equivalent).

At 200mm, the working distance of the lens is 905 mm (90.5 cm, ~35.63 in), or approximately three (3) feet. With a 16mm extension tube mounted between the lens and camera body, the working distance is reduced to 595 mm (59.5 cm, ~23.43 in), or approximately two (2) feet. At a focal length of 55mm, adding the extension tube would result in photos that look more like “macro” photos; at 200mm, adding the extension tube resulted in photos that look like a lens with a longer focal length was used to take the shots.

The first photo is uncropped. I’ve never been able to get a shot like this using a mid-range telephoto zoom lens such as the Fujinon 55-200mm. The 16mm extension tube is the difference-maker.

The last photo is cropped slightly, but not enough to affect the apparent magnification. I look closely at the edges of my photos. In this case, I cropped the photo to remove some distracting elements and leading lines.

Editor’s Notes

I bought a set of two “Fotasy” brand extension tubes (10mm, 16mm) years before Fujifilm released their set of two. The advantage of the Fotasy extension tubes is a set of two costs a little more than half as much as a single Fujifilm extension tube. The disadvantage is compatibility. The Fotasy extension tubes work with my Fujinon XF18-55mm (27-82.5mm, 35mm equivalent) “kit” lens and Fujinon XF55-200mm mid-range telephoto zoom lens; they don’t work with my Fujinon XF100-400mm (152-609mm, 35mm equivalent) telephoto zoom lens. For what it’s worth, the 100-400mm lens was released after the Fotasy extension tubes. Bottom line: I recommend Fujifilm extension tubes, despite the fact that they are significantly more expensive than Fotasy extension tubes.

The Depth of Field is razor thin, in contrast with shooting without an extension tube. I shot the preceding photos at f/11; f/16 or smaller would have been better.

In order to reduce “camera shake,” I almost always shoot in shutter priority mode using the reciprocal rule. Remember, it’s the 35mm equivalent that matters: since my lens is ~300mm, the shutter speed should be set for at least 1/300s; in this case, it was set for 1/1,000s. A monopod was used for added stability.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Common Sanddragon (male)

July 23, 2017

A Common Sanddragon dragonfly (Progomphus obscurus) was spotted along Dogue Creek at Wickford Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, as indicated by his terminal appendages and “indented” hind wings.

Some people imagine the yellow markings along the abdomen look like small burning candles.

All of the photographs in this set are uncropped. Knee-high rubber boots enabled me to photowalk some segments the stream, allowing me to get close to the subject.

This guy was a cooperative model; he allowed me to photograph him from many viewpoints.

The water level was relatively high after recent heavy rainfall. As a result, there were fewer sandy “beaches” than usual along the stream. I speculate the dragonfly may have been more cooperative because he wasn’t going to abandon one of only a few available preferred places to perch.

It’s possible the right front leg (facing forward) is either malformed or injured. Although the male flew several short patrols, landing in different places, the leg was never fully extended.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Eastern Ringtail dragonfly (female)

July 21, 2017

An Eastern Ringtail dragonfly (Erpetogomphus designatus) was spotted along the Potomac River at Riverbend Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female, as indicated by her terminal appendages and rounded hind wings.

(See a full-size version of the original photo, without annotation.)

I saw tens of male Eastern Ringtail, but only one female.

The preceding photograph is my favorite in the set. I like the way the neutral colors in the pavement complement the coloration of the female.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

“Big Boy”

July 19, 2017

Several Eastern Ringtail dragonflies (Erpetogomphus designatus) were spotted along the Potomac River at Riverbend Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. These individuals are male, as indicated by their terminal appendages and “indented” hind wings.

All of the photos in this set were taken using my Fujifilm X-T1 digital camera, Fujinon 100-400mm telephoto zoom lens, and Fujifilm EF-X500 shoe mount flash.

I nicknamed the Fujinon 100-400mm lens “Big Boy” because it’s so big and heavy. I use a Sunpak 6700M monopod and Vanguard SBH 100 ball head to support the lens.

Zoom in on the full-size version of the preceding photo. Notice the terminal appendages are spread apart, revealing a clear look at both the cerci and hook-shaped epiproct.

Related Resource: You complete me – a blog post published on 19 February 2016 in which I shared my first impressions of the Fujinon 100-400mm telephoto zoom lens.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Eastern Ringtail dragonflies (more males)

July 17, 2017

Many Eastern Ringtail dragonflies (Erpetogomphus designatus) were spotted along the Potomac River at Riverbend Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. All of the individuals in this gallery are male, as indicated by their terminal appendages and “indented” hind wings.

Please look at the full-size version of each photo in order to appreciate the coloration of these handsome male dragonflies.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Eastern Ringtail dragonflies (males)

July 15, 2017

Tens of Eastern Ringtail dragonflies (Erpetogomphus designatus) were spotted along the Potomac River at Riverbend Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. Both individuals featured in this post are male, as indicated by their terminal appendages and “indented” hind wings.

Regular readers of my photoblog know I’m fond of head-tilts in which the dragonfly seems to display some of its personality, especially when the individual is looking at me. Like the male featured in the following photo — one of my all-time favorites!

In my opinion, the unique coloration of Erpetogomphus designatus rivals Genus Ophiogomphus (Snaketails). There, I said it!

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Black-shouldered Spinyleg (males)

July 11, 2017

Several Black-shouldered Spinyleg dragonflies (Dromogomphus spinosus) were spotted recently in Fairfax County, Virginia USA. All of these individuals are male, as indicated by their terminal appendages and “indented” hind wings.

Male 1

Male 1 and 2 were observed along a mid-size rocky stream. It’s possible the photos show the same male observed at different times, although several Black-shouldered Spinyleg have been seen at this location.

26 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Black-shouldered Spinyleg (male)

Male 2

26 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Black-shouldered Spinyleg (male)

It seems like all of the male Black-shouldered Spinyleg at this location are very skittish — they flew away almost every time I waded slowly into the stream for a closer shot!

26 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Black-shouldered Spinyleg (male)

Male 3

The last male was spotted perching on a large boulder, overlooking Bull Run.

26 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Black-shouldered Spinyleg (male)

The water was too deep on three sides of the rock to allow me to photograph the dragonfly from multiple angles, so I made the most of the only view that was available.

26 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Black-shouldered Spinyleg (male)

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


%d bloggers like this: