Posts Tagged ‘Family Gomphidae (Clubtails)’

Common Sanddragon (male)

July 23, 2017

A Common Sanddragon dragonfly (Progomphus obscurus) was spotted along Dogue Creek at Wickford Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, as indicated by his terminal appendages and “indented” hind wings.

Some people imagine the yellow markings along the abdomen look like small burning candles.

All of the photographs in this set are uncropped. Knee-high rubber boots enabled me to photowalk some segments the stream, allowing me to get close to the subject.

This guy was a cooperative model; he allowed me to photograph him from many viewpoints.

The water level was relatively high after recent heavy rainfall. As a result, there were fewer sandy “beaches” than usual along the stream. I speculate the dragonfly may have been more cooperative because he wasn’t going to abandon one of only a few available preferred places to perch.

It’s possible the right front leg (facing forward) is either malformed or injured. Although the male flew several short patrols, landing in different places, the leg was never fully extended.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Eastern Ringtail dragonfly (female)

July 21, 2017

An Eastern Ringtail dragonfly (Erpetogomphus designatus) was spotted along the Potomac River at Riverbend Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female, as indicated by her terminal appendages and rounded hind wings.

(See a full-size version of the original photo, without annotation.)

I saw tens of male Eastern Ringtail, but only one female.

The preceding photograph is my favorite in the set. I like the way the neutral colors in the pavement complement the coloration of the female.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

“Big Boy”

July 19, 2017

Several Eastern Ringtail dragonflies (Erpetogomphus designatus) were spotted along the Potomac River at Riverbend Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. These individuals are male, as indicated by their terminal appendages and “indented” hind wings.

All of the photos in this set were taken using my Fujifilm X-T1 digital camera, Fujinon 100-400mm telephoto zoom lens, and Fujifilm EF-X500 shoe mount flash.

I nicknamed the Fujinon 100-400mm lens “Big Boy” because it’s so big and heavy. I use a Sunpak 6700M monopod and Vanguard SBH 100 ball head to support the lens.

Zoom in on the full-size version of the preceding photo. Notice the terminal appendages are spread apart, revealing a clear look at both the cerci and hook-shaped epiproct.

Related Resource: You complete me – a blog post published on 19 February 2016 in which I shared my first impressions of the Fujinon 100-400mm telephoto zoom lens.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Eastern Ringtail dragonflies (more males)

July 17, 2017

Many Eastern Ringtail dragonflies (Erpetogomphus designatus) were spotted along the Potomac River at Riverbend Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. All of the individuals in this gallery are male, as indicated by their terminal appendages and “indented” hind wings.

Please look at the full-size version of each photo in order to appreciate the coloration of these handsome male dragonflies.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Eastern Ringtail dragonflies (males)

July 15, 2017

Tens of Eastern Ringtail dragonflies (Erpetogomphus designatus) were spotted along the Potomac River at Riverbend Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. Both individuals featured in this post are male, as indicated by their terminal appendages and “indented” hind wings.

Regular readers of my photoblog know I’m fond of head-tilts in which the dragonfly seems to display some of its personality, especially when the individual is looking at me. Like the male featured in the following photo — one of my all-time favorites!

In my opinion, the unique coloration of Erpetogomphus designatus rivals Genus Ophiogomphus (Snaketails). There, I said it!

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Black-shouldered Spinyleg (males)

July 11, 2017

Several Black-shouldered Spinyleg dragonflies (Dromogomphus spinosus) were spotted recently in Fairfax County, Virginia USA. All of these individuals are male, as indicated by their terminal appendages and “indented” hind wings.

Male 1

Male 1 and 2 were observed along a mid-size rocky stream. It’s possible the photos show the same male observed at different times, although several Black-shouldered Spinyleg have been seen at this location.

26 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Black-shouldered Spinyleg (male)

Male 2

26 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Black-shouldered Spinyleg (male)

It seems like all of the male Black-shouldered Spinyleg at this location are very skittish — they flew away almost every time I waded slowly into the stream for a closer shot!

26 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Black-shouldered Spinyleg (male)

Male 3

The last male was spotted perching on a large boulder, overlooking Bull Run.

26 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Black-shouldered Spinyleg (male)

The water was too deep on three sides of the rock to allow me to photograph the dragonfly from multiple angles, so I made the most of the only view that was available.

26 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Black-shouldered Spinyleg (male)

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Black-shouldered Spinyleg (female)

July 9, 2017

Black-shouldered Spinyleg dragonfly (Dromogomphus spinosus) was spotted recently along a rocky stream in Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female, as indicated by her terminal appendages and rounded hind wings.

26 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Black-shouldered Spinyleg (female)

Notice the spider in front of the dragonfly. Also notice the female is missing part of her left front leg.

26 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Black-shouldered Spinyleg (female)

I followed the female to several perches — she was a very cooperative model, unlike the males I photographed later the same day!

26 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Black-shouldered Spinyleg (female)

26 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Black-shouldered Spinyleg (female)

26 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Black-shouldered Spinyleg (female)

26 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Black-shouldered Spinyleg (female)

26 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Black-shouldered Spinyleg (female)

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Black-shouldered Spinyleg (male)

July 7, 2017

A Black-shouldered Spinyleg dragonfly (Dromogomphus spinosus) was spotted recently along a rocky stream in Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, as indicated by his terminal appendages and “indented” hind wings.

The first photograph is the “record shot.” Admittedly not my best work, I shot the photo in order to document the first sighting of Black-shouldered Spinyleg at this location.

21 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Black-shouldered Spinyleg (male)

As a wildlife photographer with a focus on insect photography, one of my mantras is: “Get a shot, any shot; refine the shot.” The next few photos show how I was able to refine the first shot by being patient and persistent.

21 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Black-shouldered Spinyleg (male)

Better…

21 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Black-shouldered Spinyleg (male)

Best…

21 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Black-shouldered Spinyleg (male)

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Unicorn Clubtail dragonflies (males)

July 5, 2017

Unicorn Clubtail dragonflies (Arigomphus villosipes) were spotted at several locations along the shoreline of Painted Turtle Pond, Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA.

20 JUN 2017 | OBNWR | Unicorn Clubtail (male)

All of these individuals are males, as indicated by their terminal appendages.

20 JUN 2017 | OBNWR | Unicorn Clubtail (male)

The title of the preceding photograph is “The Miracle Shot,” so named because I was able to take one and only one photo of this male before he flew away and the subject is actually in focus!

20 JUN 2017 | OBNWR | Unicorn Clubtail (male)

20 JUN 2017 | OBNWR | Unicorn Clubtail (male)

20 JUN 2017 | OBNWR | Unicorn Clubtail (male)

The last photo shows an especially clear view of the male’s terminal appendages. Zoom-in on the photo and you should notice that the epiproct (“inferior appendage”) for Cobra Clubtail is essentially a wide plate with two prongs.

20 JUN 2017 | OBNWR | Unicorn Clubtail (male)

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Lancet Clubtail dragonfly (male)

June 25, 2017

A Lancet Clubtail dragonfly (Phanogomphus exilis) was spotted during a photowalk at “Straight Fork Beaver Ponds,” Highland County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, as indicated by his terminal appendages and “indented” hind wings.

09 JUN 2017 | Highland County, VA | Lancet Clubtail (male)

This male Lancet Clubtail was spotted at the same location as a male Harpoon Clubtail dragonfly (Phanogomphus descriptus) featured in a previous post. Lancet Clubtail is a relatively widespread species of odonate, in contrast with Harpoon Clubtail.

09 JUN 2017 | Highland County, VA | Lancet Clubtail (male)

Bonus Bug

Look closely at the preceding photo. Did you notice the exuvia from another type of aquatic insect, possibly either mayfly or stonefly? I didn’t see the exuvia when I shot the photo, and missed them again when I post-processed the image. Sometimes I get so focused on the subject that I don’t see the bigger picture.

Tech Tips

The photos were taken using a Fujifilm X-T1 digital camera, Fujinon 55-200mm zoom lens, and Fujifilm EF-X500 shoe mount flash.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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