Posts Tagged ‘Family Lestidae (Spreadwings)’

Previews of Coming Attractions – Fall Species of Odonates

August 31, 2021

There is an annual cycle of odonate activity that can be subdivided into three broad categories: Early Season (spring); Mid-season (summver); and Late Season (fall).

As we endure the “Dog Days of Summer,” waiting for the calendar to turn to fall, it’s time to begin looking for the Late Season (fall) species of odonates.

This blog post provides a photo sampler of some of the fall species of odonates that can be seen during September, October, and November in the Commonwealth of Virginia. This post is not intended to be a comprehensive field guide that features every odonate species that can be seen during the same time period.

Full Disclosure

Some fall species are easier to find than others. And some species are flyers rather than perchers, making it almost essential to capture them in flight using an insect net. That being said, it’s richly rewarding to find any of the rare to uncommon species so do your homework and be persistent. Good luck and happy hunting!


Editor’s Notes

Click on the date listed in the caption for each photo to see the original blog post for that image; click on the odonate name to see all of my blog posts related to that species.

Sincere thanks to Michael Boatwright, founder and administrator of the Virginia Odonata Facebook group, for providing photographs of many of the rare to uncommon fall species of odonates featured in this photo sampler. Click on the word “Photo” in the caption for each of Mike’s photographs to see his original Facebook post for that image.

Every species features the following information: common name; scientific name; early-date/late-date; abundance; and habitat. All information is excerpted from “CHECKLIST OF THE DRAGONFLIES AND DAMSELFLIES OF VIRGINIA, April 2017 and April 2020 updates” by Dr. Steve Roble, Staff Zoologist at the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, Division of Natural Heritage.


Dragonflies (Order Anisoptera)

Family Aeshnidae (Darners)

Black-tipped Darner (Aeshna tuberculifera)

Adult flight period: JUN 30 – OCT 29. Rare to uncommon. Habitat: Montane ponds.

Photo used with written permission from Michael Boatwright.

Common Green Darner (Anax junius)

Adult flight period: FEB 27 – DEC 30. Common. Habitat: Ponds.

Fawn Darner (Boyeria vinosa)

Adult flight period: JUN 03 – NOV 07. Common. Habitat: Streams, rivers.

Shadow Darner (Aeshna umbrosa)

Adult flight period: JUN 08 – DEC 05. Common. Habitat: Ponds, streams.

Family Corduliidae (Emeralds)

Clamp-tipped Emerald (Somatochlora tenebrosa)

Adult flight period: JUN 08 – OCT 15. Common. Habitat: Ponds, small streams.

Photo used with written permission from Michael Boatwright.

Fine-lined Emerald (Somatochlora filosa)

Adult flight period: JUL 10 – OCT 15. Rare to uncommon. Habitat: Boggy streams, swamps, marshes.

18 SEP 2019 | PNC. Wm. County | Fine-lined Emerald (male)

Family Gomphidae (Clubtails)

Arrow Clubtail (Stylurus spiniceps)

Adult flight period: JUN 13 – OCT 19. Uncommon to common. Habitat: Rivers.

Photo used with written permission from Michael Boatwright.

Laura’s Clubtail (Stylurus laurae)

Adult flight period: JUN 20 – SEP 26. Rare to uncommon. Habitat: Streams, rivers.

Photo used with written permission from Michael Boatwright.

Russet-tipped Clubtail (Stylurus plagiatus)

Adult flight period: JUN 15 – NOV 06. Uncommon to common. Habitat: Streams, rivers.

Family Libellulidae (Skimmers)

Autumn Meadowhawk (Sympetrum vicinum)

Adult flight period: MAY 28 – JAN 03. Common. Habitat: Ponds.

Blue-faced Meadowhawk (Sympetrum ambiguum)

Adult flight period: MAY 22 – NOV 19. Uncommon. Habitat: Swamps, ponds.

Black Saddlebags (Tramea lacerata)

Adult flight period: APR 12 – OCT 30. Common. Habitat: Ponds.

(See a full-size version of the original photo, without annotation.)

Spot-winged Glider (Pantala hymenaea)

Adult flight period: MAY 08 – OCT 20. Common. Habitat: Ponds.

A Spot-winged Glider dragonfly (Pantala hymenaea) netted at Saint Louis Catholic School, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female.

20 JUL 2016 | Fairfax County, VA USA | Spot-winged Glider (female)

Wandering Glider (Pantala flavescens)

Adult flight period: MAY 02 – NOV 17. Common. Habitat: Ponds.

Damselflies (Order Zygoptera)

Family Lestidae (Spreadwings)

Great Spreadwing (Archilestes grandis)

Adult flight period: JUN 25 – NOV 11. Uncommon. Habitat: Streams, ponds.

Spotted Spreadwing (Lestes congener)

Adult flight period: JUN 10 – NOV 11. Uncommon. Habitat: Ponds.

Photo used with written permission from Michael Boatwright.

 


Classification of Fall Species into Sub-groups

Migratory Species

At least five major species of dragonflies known to be migratory in North America.

  • Black Saddlebags (Tramea lacerata)
  • Common Green Darner (Anax junius)
  • Spot-winged Glider (Pantala hymenaea)
  • Wandering Glider (Pantala flavescens)

Rare to Uncommon Species

  • Arrow Clubtail (Stylurus spiniceps)
  • Black-tipped Darner (Aeshna tuberculifera)
  • Blue-faced Meadowhawk (Sympetrum ambiguum)
  • Clamp-tipped Emerald (Somatochlora tenebrosa)
  • Fine-lined Emerald (Somatochlora filosa)
  • Laura’s Clubtail (Stylurus laurae)
  • Ocellated Darner (Boyeria grafiana)
  • Great Spreadwing (Archilestes grandis)
  • Spotted Spreadwing (Lestes congener)

Copyright © 2021 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Slender Spreadwing damselfly (female)

October 16, 2020

Michael Powell spotted a Slender Spreadwing damselfly (Lestes rectangularis) perched on greenbriar vine in a wetland area alongside the gravel trail we were following out of Huntley Meadows Park, located in Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

This individual is a female, as indicated by her coloration and terminal appendages. Notice the tip of her abdomen is enlarged because of her reproductive anatomy, including an ovipositor.

Female Slender Spreadwing can be confused with female Southern Spreadwing damselflies. Several key field marks are used to differentiate the two species.

Blue shoulder stripes, slender abdomen, the ratio of abdominal segments seven and nine (S7 and S9), and whitish wing tips all point to Slender Spreadwing. S7 is more than twice the length of S9 in Slender, covered in Ed Lam’s book. Source Credit: Dr. Michael Moore, a professor (retired) in the Department of Biological Sciences at University of Delaware and odonate expert extraordinaire. Dr. Moore’s new Web site is a treasure trove of helpful resources.

Related Resource: Damselflies of the Northeast, by Ed Lam (author and illustrator).

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

MYN – Zygoptera exuvia (ventral-lateral view)

March 27, 2020

A Zygoptera exuvia (species unknown) was collected on 21 May 2019 alongside a small pond at an undisclosed location in Prince William County, Virginia USA.

This individual is a member of Family Lestidae (Spreadwings), as indicated by the unique shape of its prementum — it reminds me of a rattle (musical instrument).

The rudimentary ovipositor that is faintly visible on the ventral side of abdominal segment nine (S9) indicates this specimen is a female.

21 MAY 2019 | Zygoptera exuvia (ventrallateral view) | female

My what long antennae you have, Grandma! The better to sense you, my dear.

Related Resources

Tech Tips

This subject was photographed against a pure white background (255, 255, 255) using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique.

Three photos were used to create a composite image: one photo focused on the head; another focused on the wing pads; and a third focused on abdominal segment six (S6).

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Left on the cutting room floor

April 15, 2019

Close readers of my blog may have noticed I’ve posted a lot of photos recently that were taken years ago. Why were the photos passed over for publication closer to the time the shots were taken?

Sometimes there are better shots from the same photowalk that I’m eager to share, and sometimes they just don’t make the grade. The former requires no explanation; the following photos help to illustrate the latter.

The following female Slender Spreadwing damselfly (Lestes rectangularis) was spotted during a photowalk around a vernal pool in the forest at Huntley Meadows Park. The damselfly was perched in a hidey-hole in the vegetation at angle that made it impossible to get the entire subject in focus from head-to-tail.

The first photo shows the head and thorax in focus, but the tip of the abdomen and terminal appendages are out of focus.

15 SEP 2016 | HMP | Slender Spreadwing (female)

The last photo shows the tip of the abdomen and terminal appendages in focus, but the head and thorax are in soft focus. Look closely at a full-size version of the photo and you can see both styli (sing. stylus), structures that serve as sensors (like “curb feelers“) in egg positioning during oviposition.

15 SEP 2016 | HMP | Slender Spreadwing (female)

The odd thing is the focus point is nearly the same in both photos, and the aperture is identical. Go figure! Anyway, less than ideal focus is something that will cause me to reject photos every time. And then there’s that “too hot” blade of grass in the lower-right corner — talk about distracting!

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Great Spreadwing (practice oviposition)

October 15, 2017

This gallery — named “practice oviposition” (egg-laying) — features a six-photo time series of a female Great Spreadwing damselfly (Archilestes grandis).

Female Great Spreadwing damselflies, like all female odonates, have two cerci (sing. cercus), superior appendages that have little or no function. Also notice two styli (sing. stylus), structures that serve as sensors (like “curb feelers“) in egg positioning during oviposition.

(See a full-size version of the original photo, without annotation.)

The female uses her styli to guide the ovipositor into position, as shown in the next two photos.

In this case, I saw no evidence that the ovipositor actually penetrated the tree twig. I think this was a practice run in preparation for the real thing, as the title of this blog post says.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Great Spreadwing damselfly (female)

October 13, 2017

A Great Spreadwing damselfly (Archilestes grandis) was spotted near a vernal pool at a remote location in Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

This individual is a female, as indicated by her terminal appendages and external reproductive anatomy, including two styli and an ovipositor.

Sometimes I struggle to choose between two similar images, so I decided to post both photos.

The following photo captured the “feel” of the morning light especially well.

The next two photos are among my favorites in this set.

This female was a more cooperative model after she moved to a perch on a man-made brush pile that provides habitat and shelter for many types of animals.

Female Great Spreadwing damselflies, like all female odonates, have two cerci (sing. cercus), superior appendages that have little or no function. Also notice two styli (sing. stylus), structures that serve as sensors (like “curb feelers“) in egg positioning during oviposition.

My next blog post will feature a six-photo time series that I named “practice oviposition” (egg-laying).

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Pop quiz answer key

June 9, 2017

Perhaps the simplest way to provide answers to the recent pop quiz — in which readers were challenged to identify the gender of two Southern Spreadwing damselflies (Lestes australis) — is to show what the teneral/immature male (shown in my last post) will look like when he’s a little older.

The following photos show Southern Spreadwings spotted at Mason Neck West Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. Both individuals are male, as indicated by their terminal appendages and blue coloration.

Both photographs of the male Southern Spreadwings were taken at an angle that shows their terminal appendages clearly.

All male damselflies have four terminal appendages, collectively called “claspers.” Male damselfly terminal appendages don’t look exactly the same for all species of damselflies, but their function is identical. Claspers are used to grab and hold female damselflies during mating: an upper pair of cerci (“superior appendages”) and a lower pair of paraprocts (“inferior appendages”).

In contrast, female damselflies have two cerci (sing. cercus), superior appendages that have little or no function. Notice the two “nubs” at the tip of the abdomen, as shown in the photo of the female Southern Spreadwing that was featured in the pop quiz.

Editor’s Notes: There are four families of damselflies (Suborder Zygoptera) in the United States of America, although only three families occur in the mid-Atlantic region: Family Calopterygidae (Broad-winged Damselflies)Family Coenagrionidae (Narrow-winged Damselflies); and Family Lestidae (Spreadwings).

Male Broad-winged Damselflies and Spreadwing Damselflies have terminal appendages that are large enough to see with the unaided eye. Generally speaking, both male and female Narrow-winged Damselflies are too small to see their terminal appendages clearly in most photographs.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Pop quiz

June 7, 2017

OK, it’s time to assess what you’ve learned about damselflies by following my blog.

Two Southern Spreadwing damselflies (Lestes australis) were photographed on the same day at the same location. Both damselflies are teneral/immature, that is, they are relatively young. One is a female; one is a male. Can you identify the gender of the damselflies shown in the following photos?

I’ll give you a hint: Examine their terminal appendages by looking at the full-size version of both photos.

No. 1

No. 2

Editor’s Note: The answer key will be published in my next post.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Voltinism, revisited

April 30, 2017

Voltinism is a term used in biology to indicate the number of broods or generations of an organism in a year. Source Credit: Wikipedia.

Some species of odonates, such as Southern Spreadwing damselfly (Lestes australis), can be multivoltine.

Huntley Meadows Park

Long-term monitoring of a vernal pool at Huntley Meadows Park has shown Southern Spreadwing is multivoltine at that site.

Mason Neck West Park

Males and females from a single brood of Southern Spreadwing were observed during Fall 2016 at Mason Neck West Park; males from another brood were spotted at the same location on 05 April 2017 and again on 18 April 2017. This evidence suggests Southern Spreadwing is multivoltine at Mason Neck West Park (MNWP). Further field observations are necessary to determine whether more than two broods occur at this location.

This individual is a male, as indicated by his coloration and terminal appendages.

Please look at the full-size versions of the preceding photos in order to appreciate the “fresh” coloration that seems to be a noticeable characteristic for many species of recently-emerged odonates.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Slender Spreadwing damselflies (females)

March 25, 2017

Two female Slender Spreadwing damselflies (Lestes rectangularis) were spotted during a photowalk around a vernal pool in the forest at Huntley Meadows Park.

No. 1

No. 2

Notice the second individual is bluer in color. Coloration is variable, so it’s better to look at other field markers when making an identification.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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