Posts Tagged ‘Family Libellulidae (Skimmers)’

Lunch time

January 21, 2018

A Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum) was spotted at ~12:13 p.m. near a vernal pool at a remote location in Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, eating an unknown species of winged insect.

25 OCT 2017 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male, eating)

The first photo is the scene-setter.

25 OCT 2017 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male, eating)

The last two photos are cropped so that the predator and prey are more prominent. The dragonfly barely moved from the first-to-last photos; the position of the butterfly/moth moved slightly as it was eaten.

25 OCT 2017 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male, eating)

Did you notice there are three insects shown in each photo? Perhaps the fly is an opportunist, waiting to clean-up the leftovers from the dragonfly’s lunch.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

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Resting on a Coleman camp stool

January 13, 2018

In addition to my photography gear, I usually carry a Coleman camp stool when I go photowalking. The small, lightweight folding chair is good for resting while waiting for “the game to come to me.” The camp stool also enables me to get closer to subjects either on- or near the ground. And I think it’s easier to hold my camera rock-steady when I’m sitting on the chair with my elbows resting on my knees.

I like my Coleman camp stool. Some of my favorite insects like to rest on the camp stool too!

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Autumn Meadowhawk (male, perching on a stool)

An Autumn Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum vicinum) was spotted near a vernal pool at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, perching on a Coleman camp stool.

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Autumn Meadowhawk (male, perching on a stool)

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Autumn Meadowhawk (male, perching on a stool)

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies (mating pairs, in wheel)

January 11, 2018

Several mating pairs of Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum vicinum) were spotted during a photowalk around a vernal pool at a remote location in Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Autumn Meadowhawk (mating pair, “in wheel“)

Both pairs are “in wheel“: the male is on top; the female is on the bottom.

All odonates (dragonflies and damselflies) have a 10-segmented abdomen, numbered from front to back. Male dragonfly secondary genitalia, called hamules, are located in segments two and three (S2 and S3); female genitalia in segment eight (S8). Dragonflies form the mating wheel in order for their genitalia to connect during copulation.

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Autumn Meadowhawk (mating pair, “in wheel“)

Editor’s Note: Careful readers may be thinking “Hey, wait a minute — you said you spotted several mating pairs, but the post features photos of just two pairs.” Good catch! The photos of two more mating pairs didn’t make the final cut because the focus was slightly soft in all of those photos.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

New discoveries in 2017 (odonates)

December 28, 2017

There’s always more to discover/learn! My odonate-related new discoveries in 2017 are presented in reverse-chronological order.

Fine-lined Emerald dragonfly

A Fine-lined Emerald dragonfly (Somatochlora filosa) was spotted at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA. This individual is one of several males spotted during a period of a week-or-so in mid-September 2017.

Immature male Calico Pennant

20 JUN 2017 | OBNWR | Calico Pennant (immature male)

A Calico Pennant dragonfly (Celithemis elisa) was spotted at Painted Turtle Pond, Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA. This individual is an immature male. Notice its coloration is similar to female Calico Pennants.

Allegheny River Cruiser dragonfly

An Allegheny River Cruiser (Macromia alleghaniensis) was netted by Mike Blust at Hardware River Wildlife Management Area, Fluvanna County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male.

Harpoon Clubtail dragonfly

09 JUN 2017 | Highland County, VA | Harpoon Clubtail (male)

A Harpoon Clubtail dragonfly (Phanogomphus descriptus) was spotted at “Straight Fork,” Highland County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male. Sincere thanks to fellow Virginians Karen Kearney and Mike Boatwright for guiding me to this unique high-elevation habitat.

It’s worth noting that I saw two more new species during the same trip: Riffle Snaketail (Ophiogomphus carolus); and Dot-tailed Whiteface (Leucorrhinia intacta).

Those who know me well are familiar with one of many “Walterisms”: “I haven’t ‘seen’ something until I have photographed it.” My rationale is two-fold: 1) A photograph verifies a sighting. 2) The detail visible in a good photograph exceeds the acuity of the human eye. Suffice it to say I saw two other species but haven’t seen them. Makes sense to me!

Swift River Cruiser dragonfly

A Swift River Cruiser dragonfly (Macromia illinoiensis) was spotted at Riverbend Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is an emergent/teneral female.

Spine-crowned Clubtail dragonfly

A Spine-crowned Clubtail dragonfly (Hylogomphus abbreviatus) spotted along Bull Run at Hemlock Overlook Regional Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male. A female was spotted on the same day at a nearby location.

Epitheca cynosura exuvia

A Common Baskettail dragonfly (Epitheca cynosura) exuvia was collected at Painted Turtle Pond, Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA.

Epitheca princeps exuvia

05 MAR 2017 | Prince Baskettail (Epitheca princeps) | exuvia (face-head)

A Prince Baskettail dragonfly (Epitheca princeps) exuvia was collected from an unknown location. This specimen was on temporary loan from Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Urban Heat Island

December 10, 2017

On 01 December 2017 I didn’t see any Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum vicinum) during a photowalk along Easy Road at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA.

In contrast, I saw several Autumn Meadowhawks perched on man-made structures such as a concrete curb in the blacktop parking lot at the refuge. All of the dragonflies were perched on vertical surfaces that received more direct insolation than horizontal surfaces. The parking area seems to be an urban heat island microclimate that exists within a larger natural area.

Male 1

The first individual is a male, as indicated by his terminal appendages. Although the male is missing one of four wings, he was able to fly well enough to move to three different perches along the curb.

01 DEC 2017 | Occoquan Bay NWR | Autumn Meadowhawk (male, injured)

01 DEC 2017 | Occoquan Bay NWR | Autumn Meadowhawk (male, injured)

01 DEC 2017 | Occoquan Bay NWR | Autumn Meadowhawk (male, injured)

Male 2

The next male has a full set of four wings; his wings are tattered slightly, as expected toward the end of dragonfly season.

The last photo shows the male grooming and excreting at the same time.

Related Resources

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

“Winter Meadowhawk” dragonflies

December 8, 2017

The season called “winter” is defined two ways: atmospheric scientists, including meteorologists and climatologists, define winter as the three-month period from December to February; astronomers define winter as the time period that begins on the December Solstice (12/21) and ends on the March Equinox (03/21), although the actual dates for these events may vary slightly.

Several Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum vicinum) were spotted on the first day of climatological winter at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA. Therefore I think it is appropriate to call them “Winter Meadowhawks.”

The last two photos show the same male, perching on different surfaces. My guess is he was looking for a good source of thermal energy on a cool, windy day.

The Sun is always low in the sky during winter, even at its maximum altitude. Indirect incoming solar radiation (insolation) is less intense than direct insolation. The last photo shows the male dragonfly perched on a south-facing wooden board that is perpendicular to the surface of the Earth, therefore the solar energy received by the board is more intense than the energy received by the ground. This probably explains why the male moved from the ground to the board.

Enrichment

The last photo was taken on 01 December 2017 at 11:33:50 a.m. EST, as shown by the EXIF information for the image. The altitude of the Sun was 28.9° at 11:30 a.m., meaning a ray of sunlight formed an angle of 28.9° with horizontal surfaces such as the ground. At the same time, a ray of sunlight formed an angle of 61.1° with vertical surfaces such as the wooden board shown in the first and last photos. That’s the beauty of mathematics — some simple geometry shows clearly which surface received more intense insolation. Smart dragonflies!

Related Resource: Sun or Moon Altitude/Azimuth Table, U.S. Naval Observatory.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

A week later…

November 26, 2017

On 09 November 2017 I visited Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA, looking for late-season odonates before the first hard freeze. Several Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum vicinum) were spotted during a photowalk along Easy Road.

I revisited the same place one week later. I saw slightly fewer Autumn Meadowhawks than the week before. Although some dragonflies survived the freezing temperatures, their numbers seemed to be diminished according to my non-scientific survey.

Both individuals featured in this photo set are male, as indicated by their terminal appendages.

I love the palette of fall colors in the first two photos! The two-photo sequence shows how I typically “work a shot.” I start by “getting a shot, any shot” (above) and slowly refine the shot until I am able to get as close as the subject will allow, while looking at the overall composition (below). Remember to check the edges of the photo for leading lines and distracting elements.

The last dragonfly I photographed was perched on the wooden border of a flower bed located near the parking lot.

Related Resources: Five Guys; Thermal energy vampire!

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Thermal energy vampire!

November 24, 2017

The following photographs show an Autumn Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum vicinum) perching on Walter Sanford (hey, that’s me!) at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, as indicated by his terminal appendages.

All three photos were taken by Lisa Young during a photowalk with me along Easy Road.

Most dragonflies are skittish. Some species of dragonflies are “friendly,” such as Blue Corporal dragonflies (Ladona deplanata) and Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum vicinum). It’s probably not a coincidence that both types of dragonflies are early- and late-season species, when the ambient air temperature is cooler.

Some odonate experts speculate dragonflies perch on people in order to absorb thermal energy radiated by the relatively warm human body. Or in this case, a black backpack — a good spot since darker-colored objects absorb and re-radiate thermal energy more quickly than lighter-colored objects.

Related Resource: Five Guys, a blog post by Walter Sanford featuring photos of male Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies taken before the meet-up with Liza Young.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Five Guys

November 16, 2017

Several Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum vicinum) were spotted along Easy Road at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA. All of these individuals are male, as indicated by their terminal appendages.

Did you notice the preceding male appears to be missing his right hind wing? Perhaps I should rename this blog post “4.75 Guys.”

Editor’s Note: The photos in this gallery were taken a day before the first hard freeze in Northern Virginia that occurred overnight on Friday-Saturday, November 10-11. It will be interesting to see how many Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies survived the record-setting low temperatures in the mid- to upper 20s.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Unambiguously Sympetrum ambiguum

November 10, 2017

Two Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum ambiguum) were spotted during a photowalk along Charlie Road at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA. Although Blue-faced Meadowhawk is on the species list of dragonflies and damselflies at Occoquan Bay NWR, this is the first time I have seen Sympetrum ambiguum at the refuge.

Male

This first individual is a male, as indicated by his terminal appendages.

19 OCT 2017 | OBNWR | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male)

This guy was skittish. I was able to take one photo before he flew toward the tree canopy. The preceding photograph is what my good friend Mike Boatwright calls a “record shot,” that is, a photograph that records (verifies) my sighting of the male Sympetrum ambiguum. The photo was cropped slightly for improved composition.

Female

The last individual is a female heteromorph, as indicated by her tan coloration and terminal appendages.

The preceding photograph is my “record shot” of the female. I worked the shot…

…until I found the best viewpoint, shown below.

The first and last photos of the female were cropped slightly for improved composition; the second photo is uncropped.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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