Posts Tagged ‘Family Libellulidae (Skimmers)’

MYN – Tramea sp. exuvia (ventral)

February 3, 2020

An odonate exuvia, collected by Andy Davidson near Richmond, Virginia USA, was photographed against a pure white background using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique. Two photos were used to create a composite image: one photo focused on the prementum; and another photo focused on abdominal segment eight (S8).

This individual is from the Genus Tramea (Saddlebags), in the Family Libellulidae (Skimmers). Since it’s nearly impossible to differentiate exuviae from the Genus Tramea to the species level, we’ll leave its identity as Tramea sp. It’s the same specimen featured in my last three blog posts: MYN – Tramea sp. exuvia (face-head-dorsal)MYN – Tramea sp. exuvia (dorsal); MYN – Tramea sp. exuvia (dorsal-lateral).

Tech Tips

The subject was photographed against a pure white background using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique. The exuvia was “staged” on a clear plastic surface raised ~1.5 in (~3.81 cm) above the white background.

The dorsal side of the specimen was lying on the clear plastic. The “eyes” were closer to the light source than all other photos/composite images in a four-part series of this subject; as a result, the eyes look washed out. I know from experience that problem can be solved by moving the clear plastic stage farther from the white background.

In this case, I was less concerned about showing the eyes in their best light and more concerned about looking for signs of sex organs that indicate gender. I don’t see anything that looks like either vestigial genitalia (male) or a rudimentary ovipositor (female).

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

MYN – Tramea sp. exuvia (dorsal-lateral)

January 31, 2020

An odonate exuvia, collected by Andy Davidson near Richmond, Virginia USA, was photographed against a pure white background using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique. Two photos were used to create a composite image: one photo focused on the thorax, near the left eye; and another photo focused on abdominal segment eight (S8).

This individual is from the Genus Tramea (Saddlebags), in the Family Libellulidae (Skimmers). Since it’s nearly impossible to differentiate exuviae from the Genus Tramea to the species level, we’ll leave its identity as Tramea sp. It’s the same specimen featured in my last two blog posts: MYN – Tramea sp. exuvia (face-head-dorsal); MYN – Tramea sp. exuvia (dorsal).

What are the take-aways?

I have been wondering whether the MYN technique could be used to create focus-stacked composite images. Wonder no more — it works and the results are worth the extra effort.

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

MYN – Tramea sp. exuvia (face-head-dorsal)

January 29, 2020

An odonate exuvia, collected by Andy Davidson near Richmond, Virginia USA, was photographed against a pure white background using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique.

This individual is from the Genus Tramea (Saddlebags), in the Family Libellulidae (Skimmers). Since it’s nearly impossible to differentiate exuviae from the Genus Tramea to the species level, we’ll leave its identity as Tramea sp. It is the same specimen featured in my last blog post.

Tramea sp. | exuvia (face-head-dorsal)

Related Resource: Tramea carolina exuvia.

Tech Tips

The subject was photographed against a pure white background using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique. The exuvia was “staged” on a clear plastic surface raised ~1.5 in (~3.81 cm) above the white background.

If you look at the “Categories” shown below this blog post, then you will see three external flash units listed: Canon MT-26EX-RT Macro Twin Lite; Godox TT685C; and Godox TT685F. In fact, either one or two flashes at a time are used during a typical MYN photoshoot. The Godox TT685C is always on; it’s used to backlight the white plastic background. Sometimes the TT685C is the only flash that fires; other times I will use either the Canon Macro Twin Lite or Godox TT685F for fill flash.

Although the EXIF Info says “Flash fired” there is no way to tell which flash(es) fired and their power ratio(s). In a way, that’s a good thing because it forces me to pick the best image from a set of photos regardless of how many flashes were used to light the subject. In this case, the Godox TT685C was set for a power ratio of 1/2 +0.3 power; the Godox TT685F was set for 1/256; and the Canon Macro Twin Lite was set for 1/512.

More information about both the photo gear that I used to shoot this photo, as well as detailed practical advice for using the MYN technique is available in the following blog post: MYN – Hagenius brevistylus exuvia (dorsal).

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

MYN – Tramea sp. exuvia (dorsal)

January 27, 2020

An odonate exuvia, collected by Andy Davidson near Richmond, Virginia USA, was photographed against a pure white background using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique.

This individual is from the Genus Tramea (Saddlebags), in the Family Libellulidae (Skimmers). Since it’s nearly impossible to differentiate exuviae from the Genus Tramea to the species level, we’ll leave its identity as Tramea sp.

Related Resource: Tramea carolina exuvia.

Tech Tips

The subject was photographed against a pure white background using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique. The exuvia was “staged” on a clear plastic surface raised ~1.5 in (~3.81 cm) above the white background.

The image is uncropped, that is full frame for a Fujifilm X-T1 APS-C sensor (4896 x 3264 pixels).

Information about both the photo gear that I used to shoot this photo, as well as detailed practical advice for using the MYN technique is available in the following blog post: MYN – Hagenius brevistylus exuvia (dorsal).

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

MYN do-over – Tramea carolina exuvia (face)

January 24, 2020

Carolina Saddlebags dragonfly (Tramea carolinaexuvia, collected by Andy Davidson near Richmond, Virginia USA, was photographed against a pure white background using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique. Twice.

I love the way the original photo turned out (shown below), but the composition wasn’t quite right. So I decided to shoot a do-over (shown above).

One of the legs is broken; it was hanging on by a slender thread of spider silk, so I decided to shoot the subject “as is.” Problem is, the position of the broken leg bothers me.

The original version has a little “crunchier” look than the do-over, and I like that. Who knows? I might be compelled to do-over the do-over by tweaking the adjustments I made during post-processing. That said, unless you look at the two photos side-by-side, the updated version looks good and is certainly much improved over the original, compositon-wise.

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Tramea carolina exuvia

January 22, 2020

I’m a man on a mission to demystify identification of odonate exuviae, as I’m fond of saying. Easier said than done. In my experience, the process of identification can be challenging at best and impossible at worst.

For example, it’s nearly impossible to differentiate exuviae from the Genus Tramea (Saddlebags) to the species level.

The search for reliable larval characters to distinguish species of Tramea has generated considerable confusion in the literature. Source Credit: Landwer, Brett & Sites, Robert. (2006). Diagnostic efficacy of morphological characters of larval Tramea lacerata Hagen and Tramea onusta Hagen (Odonata: Libellulidae). Great Lakes Entomologist. 38. 155-163.

More recently, Tennessen cited the preceding research as well as a follow-up article by the same authors in 2010, and wrote…

…specific identification is still problematic. Source Credit: Tennessen, Kenneth. (2019). Dragonfly Nymphs of North America – An Identification Guide. Springer International Publishing. 567.

The fact of the matter is the most reliable way to identify odonate larvae to the species level is to rear them to maturity and emergence, that is, unless you’re fortunate to find a larva emerging in the field. Since an exuvia is essentially a nearly perfect shell of the last instar, it can be used to identify other specimens of the same species by pattern matching.

Rearing an unknown species of larva from genus Tramea

A larva from the Genus Tramea (Saddlebags) was collected by Andy Davidson near Richmond, Virginia USA, and reared to maturity. The following photo shows the adult dragonfly soon after emergence.

Photo used with permission from Andy Davidson.

The image was rotated in order to get a better look at the shape of the “saddlebags” on the rear wings of the dragonfly.

Photo used with permission from Andy Davidson.

The following composite image — created by Ed Lam, author and illustrator of Damselflies of the Northeast — clearly shows the difference in the shape of the saddlebags for Carolina- versus Red Saddlebags. Look closely at the saddlebags in the full-size version of the preceding photo and you can see the pattern perfectly matches the Carolina Saddlebags in Ed’s image, shown below.

Composite image used with permission from Ed Lam.

Look-alikes: Genus Pantala and Genus Tramea

Two genera from the Family Libellulidae (Skimmers) look similar: Genus Pantala (Rainpool Gliders); and Genus Tramea (Saddlebags). If you find an exuvia with long “tail fins,” then it might be a member of one of these two genera.

A Spot-winged Glider dragonfly (Pantala hymenaea) exuvia was collected by Andy Davidson near Richmond, Virginia USA.

A Carolina Saddlebags dragonfly (Tramea carolina) larva was collected by Andy Davidson near Richmond, Virginia USA, and reared to maturity. Andy saved the exuvia after emergence.

The following couplet from Identification Keys to Northeastern Anisoptera Larvae, compiled by Ken Soltesz, can be used to differentiate exuvia from Genus Pantala and Genus Tramea.

p. 37, Key to the Genera of the Family Libellulidae
12a – Superior abdominal appendage (epiproct) as long as, or longer than inferiors [paraprocts]. Pantala
12b – Superior abdominal appendage (epiproct) shorter than inferiors [paraprocts]. Tramea

What are the take-aways?

If you find an exuvia from the genus Tramea, then you might be unable to identify it to the species level.

I collected a Tramea sp. exuvia during Fall 2016 from a water retention pond located at a small park in Fairfax County, Virginia USA. I keyed out the specimen and identified it as Tramea carolina, in part, because Carolina Saddlebags had been observed in numbers at the same location. Am I certain of the identity? Yes and no. I’m certain the specimen is from genus Tramea; I’m reasonably sure (but not certain) it’s T. carolina. That said, my rationale is fairly good.

Related Resources

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

MYN – Tramea carolina exuvia (ventral)

January 20, 2020

Carolina Saddlebags dragonfly (Tramea carolinaexuvia was collected by Andy Davidson near Richmond, Virginia USA. Carolina Saddlebags is a member of Family Libellulidae (Skimmers).

This individual might be a female, as indicated by what appears to be a small rudimentary ovipositor located along the margin between abdominal segments eight and nine (S8-9).

Related Resources

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

MYN – Tramea carolina exuvia (dorsal)

January 17, 2020

Carolina Saddlebags dragonfly (Tramea carolinaexuvia was collected by Andy Davidson near Richmond, Virginia USA. Carolina Saddlebags is a member of Family Libellulidae (Skimmers).

Related Resources

Tech Tips

The subject was photographed against a pure white background using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique. The exuvia was “staged” on a clear plastic surface raised ~1.5 in (~3.81 cm) above the white background.

Information about both the photo gear that I used to shoot this photo, as well as detailed practical advice for using the MYN technique is available in the following blog post: MYN – Hagenius brevistylus exuvia (dorsal).

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

MYN – Tramea carolina exuvia (face-head-dorsal)

January 15, 2020

A Carolina Saddlebags dragonfly (Tramea carolina) exuvia, collected by Andy Davidson near Richmond, Virginia USA, was photographed against a pure white background using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique. Carolina Saddlebags is a member of Family Libellulidae (Skimmers).

Tech Tips

The subject was “staged” on a clear plastic surface raised ~1.5 in (~3.81 cm) above the white background. As I speculated in my last blog post, increased distance between the stage and the background seems to have resulted in improved exposure of clear features such as the “eyes.”

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Flip-it Friday

December 27, 2019

An odonate exuvia was collected by Andy Davidson near Richmond, Virginia USA. Andy is a graduate student at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) working on a research project entitled “Predator-Prey Interactions in a Changing World.”

This individual is a member of Family Libellulidae (Skimmers), possibly a species from the genus Celithemis (Pennants). Source Credit: Steve Krotzer, Haysop Hill Photography; and Andy Davidson, VCU.

Dorsal view update

The first photograph is the same photo featured in a recent blog post, with one big difference. I flipped the image digitally so that the exuvia looks more like it’s in its natural resting position on the background. The more I looked at the original image, the more I felt somewhat disoriented. Ah, much better!

Ventral view

Next I flipped the specimen physically to show a ventral view of the exuvia. Look closely at the full-size version of the photo. This individual is probably a male, as indicated by what appear to be vestigial hamules located along the boundary between abdominal segments two and three (S2-3). Remember, all odonates have 10 abdominal segments, numbered from front-to-back. In my opinion, it’s easier to count segments from the posterior- to the anterior end of the body.

The following annotated images of other dragonfly exuviae might help you to recognize the vestigial hamuli on this specimen.

Related Resources

Tech Tips

The following equipment was used to shoot the macro photographs featured in this post: Fujifilm X-T1 digital camera; Fujifilm MCEX-11 extension tube; and Fujinon XF80mm macro lens minus the lens hood. The camera was set for both manual exposure and manual focus. That’s right, a switch on the camera body is used to set the type of focus. It’s a Fujifilm thing.

Godox X2TF radio flash trigger, mounted on the hotshoe of my X-T1, was used to control two off-camera external flash units set for radio slave mode.

  1. Godox TT685C Thinklite Flash for Canon Cameras (manual mode), fitted with a “Vello Bounce Dome (Diffuser) for Canon 580EX II Flash,” was used to light the underside of the translucent white plastic background; the top of the flash unit was ~30 cm from the bottom of the white plastic.
  2. Godox TT685F Thinklite Flash for Fujifilm Cameras (manual mode), fitted with a Lastolite Ezybox Speed-Lite 2 flash modifier, was used to light the subject from above.

Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to spot heal and sharpen both images.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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