Posts Tagged ‘Genus Tramea (Saddlebags)’

MYN – Focus Stacking using Adobe Photoshop

April 1, 2020

The following tutorial provides step-by-step instructions that can be used to create focus-stacked composite images with Adobe Photoshop (Ps).

First, download (from Google Drive) the two 16-bit TIFF files that will be focus-stacked. One photo is focused on the thorax, near the left eye; the other photo is focused on abdominal segment eight (S8).

Save the files to a folder on the desktop of your computer.

Open Photoshop.

  1. File / Scripts / Load Files into Stack… [Navigate to the folder on your desktop and select both files. By default, Ps creates a new document called “Untitled1.”]
  2. Select all layers. [Click on filenames, not icons.]
  3. Edit / Auto-Align Layers; Auto <OK>
  4. Edit / Auto-Blend Layers; Stack Images, Seamless Tones and Colors <OK>
  5. Duplicate layers to a new document. Layer / Duplicate Layers… / Document: New / Name: Backup-copy]
  6. Select “Untitled1”: Layer / Merge Layers (Ps merges all layers into one TIFF, named after the first file in sequence.)
  7. Straighten and Crop as necessary.
  8. Duplicate layer; append name with “Spot Healing.” [Remove dust spots, etc. from image using either Spot Healing Brush (Content-Aware) or Edit/Fill (Content Aware).
  9. “Sharpen” image. Duplicate top layer; append name with “HPF.” [Select top layer: Filter / Other / High Pass…; adjust until you can just see outline of image <OK>; change Normal to Overlay. 1.5 is a good starting point; decrease/increase as necessary. DO NOT OVERSHARPEN!
  10. File / Save As… TIFF; JPG.
  11. Select “Backup-copy.” File / Save As… Photoshop.

The composite image that you created should look like this, not including the copyright information shown in the lower-left corner of my image.

Take-aways

A two-photo focus stack works in part because the photos were shot using an aperture of f/16. Usually more than two “layers” are required to create a satisfactory focus-stacked composite image.

The same workflow can be used to create focus stacks using more layers with one caveat: more layers take more time for Photoshop to process.

Related Resources

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

MYN – Tramea sp. exuvia (ventral)

February 3, 2020

An odonate exuvia, collected by Andy Davidson near Richmond, Virginia USA, was photographed against a pure white background using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique. Two photos were used to create a composite image: one photo focused on the prementum; and another photo focused on abdominal segment eight (S8).

This individual is from the Genus Tramea (Saddlebags), in the Family Libellulidae (Skimmers). Since it’s nearly impossible to differentiate exuviae from the Genus Tramea to the species level, we’ll leave its identity as Tramea sp. It’s the same specimen featured in my last three blog posts: MYN – Tramea sp. exuvia (face-head-dorsal)MYN – Tramea sp. exuvia (dorsal); MYN – Tramea sp. exuvia (dorsal-lateral).

Tech Tips

The subject was photographed against a pure white background using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique. The exuvia was “staged” on a clear plastic surface raised ~1.5 in (~3.81 cm) above the white background.

The dorsal side of the specimen was lying on the clear plastic. The “eyes” were closer to the light source than all other photos/composite images in a four-part series of this subject; as a result, the eyes look washed out. I know from experience that problem can be solved by moving the clear plastic stage farther from the white background.

In this case, I was less concerned about showing the eyes in their best light and more concerned about looking for signs of sex organs that indicate gender. I don’t see anything that looks like either vestigial genitalia (male) or a rudimentary ovipositor (female).

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

MYN – Tramea sp. exuvia (dorsal-lateral)

January 31, 2020

An odonate exuvia, collected by Andy Davidson near Richmond, Virginia USA, was photographed against a pure white background using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique. Two photos were used to create a composite image: one photo focused on the thorax, near the left eye; and another photo focused on abdominal segment eight (S8).

This individual is from the Genus Tramea (Saddlebags), in the Family Libellulidae (Skimmers). Since it’s nearly impossible to differentiate exuviae from the Genus Tramea to the species level, we’ll leave its identity as Tramea sp. It’s the same specimen featured in my last two blog posts: MYN – Tramea sp. exuvia (face-head-dorsal); MYN – Tramea sp. exuvia (dorsal).

What are the take-aways?

I have been wondering whether the MYN technique could be used to create focus-stacked composite images. Wonder no more — it works and the results are worth the extra effort.

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

MYN – Tramea sp. exuvia (face-head-dorsal)

January 29, 2020

An odonate exuvia, collected by Andy Davidson near Richmond, Virginia USA, was photographed against a pure white background using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique.

This individual is from the Genus Tramea (Saddlebags), in the Family Libellulidae (Skimmers). Since it’s nearly impossible to differentiate exuviae from the Genus Tramea to the species level, we’ll leave its identity as Tramea sp. It is the same specimen featured in my last blog post.

Tramea sp. | exuvia (face-head-dorsal)

Related Resource: Tramea carolina exuvia.

Tech Tips

The subject was photographed against a pure white background using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique. The exuvia was “staged” on a clear plastic surface raised ~1.5 in (~3.81 cm) above the white background.

If you look at the “Categories” shown below this blog post, then you will see three external flash units listed: Canon MT-26EX-RT Macro Twin Lite; Godox TT685C; and Godox TT685F. In fact, either one or two flashes at a time are used during a typical MYN photoshoot. The Godox TT685C is always on; it’s used to backlight the white plastic background. Sometimes the TT685C is the only flash that fires; other times I will use either the Canon Macro Twin Lite or Godox TT685F for fill flash.

Although the EXIF Info says “Flash fired” there is no way to tell which flash(es) fired and their power ratio(s). In a way, that’s a good thing because it forces me to pick the best image from a set of photos regardless of how many flashes were used to light the subject. In this case, the Godox TT685C was set for a power ratio of 1/2 +0.3 power; the Godox TT685F was set for 1/256; and the Canon Macro Twin Lite was set for 1/512.

More information about both the photo gear that I used to shoot this photo, as well as detailed practical advice for using the MYN technique is available in the following blog post: MYN – Hagenius brevistylus exuvia (dorsal).

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

MYN – Tramea sp. exuvia (dorsal)

January 27, 2020

An odonate exuvia, collected by Andy Davidson near Richmond, Virginia USA, was photographed against a pure white background using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique.

This individual is from the Genus Tramea (Saddlebags), in the Family Libellulidae (Skimmers). Since it’s nearly impossible to differentiate exuviae from the Genus Tramea to the species level, we’ll leave its identity as Tramea sp.

Related Resource: Tramea carolina exuvia.

Tech Tips

The subject was photographed against a pure white background using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique. The exuvia was “staged” on a clear plastic surface raised ~1.5 in (~3.81 cm) above the white background.

The image is uncropped, that is full frame for a Fujifilm X-T1 APS-C sensor (4896 x 3264 pixels).

Information about both the photo gear that I used to shoot this photo, as well as detailed practical advice for using the MYN technique is available in the following blog post: MYN – Hagenius brevistylus exuvia (dorsal).

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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