Posts Tagged ‘GoPro “Quik” app’

GoPro: “ProTune” is back, baby!

June 7, 2022

GoPro taketh-away; GoPro giveth back. What?

Thanks to Australian YouTuber Danny Black for a heads-up that the “GoPro Quik” app features the “ProTune” settings again. (See GoPro Tip No. 1 in the following video.)

The following screen captures from my Apple iPad mini 6 running the “GoPro Quik” app show the “ProTune” settings under “Video Settings,” “Photo Settings” …

“GoPro Quik” app | Settings

and “Time Lapse Settings.” Yep, “Protune” is back, baby!

“GoPro Quik” app | Settings

The “ProTune” settings are featured in Version 10.15 of the “GoPro Quik” app, the current version available from the Apple App Store as of this writing.

This is kind of a big deal. I wonder why GoPro didn’t mention the return of the “ProTune” settings in the Version History? It’s just so GoPro to fumble the ball like this!

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Copyright © 2022 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

GoPro: How to add “Stickers”

May 20, 2022

Every GoPro action camera since the GoPro HERO5 Black features a built-in global positioning system (GPS) receiver; my GoPro HERO4 Black does not.

Assuming you own a GPS-capable GoPro camera, there is another case for using either “Quik for Desktop” or the “GoPro Quik” app to edit video: adding overlays to video, including stickers and telemetry gauges.

GoPro legacy software “Quik for Desktop” can be used to add “Stickers” to video shot with a GoPro HERO5, 6, and 7, but doesn’t work with GoPro HERO8, 9, and 10.

The “GoPro Quik” app can be used to add “Stickers” to video shot with HERO8, 9, and 10 cameras; it’s also backward-compatible with HERO5, 6, and 7.

It’s worth noting that the “GoPro Quik” app can be used to edit a single video clip for free, with some limitations. For details see GoPro Quik: Free Vs. Subscription Features. See also GoPro Quik App- All Your Questions Answered by Jordan Hetrick (12:33).

Add “Stickers”

My good friend and former colleague Kyle Margenau sent a video clip to me that he shot using his GoPro HERO8 Black. First the video clip was saved to “Photos” on my iPad mini 6, then it was added to “Media” in the “GoPro Quik” app.

Tap the “Media” icon (shown below, highlighted by a red square) to see “All Media” saved to the “GoPro Quik” app. Kyle’s video appears at the top of the list on the page, last saved on Friday, May 13 [2022].

GoPro “Quik” app | All Media

As you can see, I already edited the video to add several “Stickers.” Tap the pencil icon (shown below, highlighted by a red square) to edit the video.

GoPro “Quik” app.

Tap the “Stickers” button (shown below, highlighted by a red square).

GoPro “Quik” app.

Up to four stickers can be displayed on the video, one in each corner.

There are currently 7 stickers available in the app:

  1. GoPro Logo
  2. Speedometer ← speed plus compass heading
  3. Terrain ← unavailable in “Quik for Desktop”
  4. Path ← line with no context
  5. Speed Chart
  6. Altitude
  7. G-Force

Source Credit: GoPro Quik: How To View Stickers.

In the following screenshot notice that blue tick marks indicate the “Stickers” that have been added to the movie.

GoPro “Quik” app | Stickers

Add more “Stickers” by tapping one of the icons (shown above, highlighted by a red rectangle). By default, the new sticker will be shown in the upper-left corner of the movie. Tap the same icon again in order to reposition the sticker to the upper-right corner. Tap the same icon again to move the sticker to the lower-right corner; tap it a fourth time to move it to the lower-left corner. Tap the same sticker icon five times in order to delete it from the movie.

Tap the ✔️ icon (lower-right corner) when you are finished (shown above, highlighted by a red square).

Save Media

Wait, you need to do one more thing. Tap the “Save” icon (shown below, highlighted by a red square) in the upper-right corner in order to save your edited video.

GoPro “Quik” app.

The following screenshot shows where the video can be saved. There are three (3) options; I recommend “Save to Photos” (shown below, highlighted by a red rectangle).

GoPro “Quik” app.

Grab Photo

Play the annotated video clip and when you see a frame you’d like to grab, pause playback and tap the “Extract Photo Icon” located along the bottom of the screen (shown below, highlighted by a red square). For more detailed directions, see GoPro: How to “Grab Photo” from Video.

GoPro “Quik” app.

You have the option to scrub through the video frame-by-frame (by using the left and right arrows) until you find a frame that you’d like to save as a photo. Tap the blue “Save Frame” button located in the upper-right corner of the “Grab Photo” screen (shown below, highlighted by a red rectangle). Then choose the location where you would like to save the frame grab: Save to App; Save to Photos; Share Media.

GoPro “Quik” app | Grab Photo

The following video frame grab (4 MP) was saved from the “GoPro-Quik” app. Kyle’s vehicle is heading southeast at 22 mph.

GoPro “Quik” app.

The last screenshot was taken from the video using the Apple “Photos” app. Notice the black bars along the top and bottom of the screen. Kyle’s vehicle is heading southeast at 12 mph.

Apple “Photos” app.

What are the take-aways?

Could the GoPro Logo “Sticker” be any bigger? It’s ridiculously big! It shouldn’t be too difficult to update the “GoPro Quik” app to enable the user to resize/reposition “Stickers,” similar to the way it works in “Quik for Desktop.”

In my opinion, the Speedometer and Terrain “Stickers” are two of the more useful telemetry gauges.

It would be nice to add numbers to the tick marks on the Speedometer. In this case, the Speedometer is marked in increments of 10 mph, but the increment varies depending upon what is shown in your movie. Also, it would be nice to show an exact number for compass direction, from 0-360°.

The Terrain “Sticker” shows the path of the camera superimposed on a map. It would be nice to have the option to select the map type, such as street, terrain, or satellite. In contrast, the Path “Sticker” is simply a line that traces, well, the path of your camera. In my opinion, a line without any context/frame of reference is pointless, but hey, use the Path “Sticker” if you like.

Related Resources

Copyright © 2022 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

GoPro: How to “Grab Photo” from Video

May 17, 2022

When you use either the “GoPro app” or “GoPro Quik” app to remotely control your camera, you can save still photos from a video clip. For example, here’s how it works using “GoPro Quik” on my Apple iPad mini 6.

The first screen capture shows the “splash page” for GoPro Quik, running on my iPad mini 6. Tap the camera icon labeled “GoPro” located in the lower-right corner of the screen. The button works, despite the fact that it’s grayed out.

GoPro “Quik” app splash screen.

Next, tap the button labeled “Control Your GoPro” on the “Cameras” page.

“Cameras” screen, GoPro “Quik” app.

Tap the “Media Icon” located in the lower-right corner of the Live View screen (shown below, highlighted by a red square) in order to see photos and videos that you have recorded using your GoPro camera.

Live View, GoPro “Quik” app.

When you play a video clip shot with the camera and see a frame you’d like to grab, pause playback and tap the “Extract Photo Icon” located in the lower-middle of the screen (shown below, highlighted by a red square).

Video playback, GoPro “Quik” app.

You have the option to scrub through the video frame-by-frame (by using the left and right arrows) until you find a frame that you’d like to save as a photo. Then tap the blue “Save Frame” button located in the upper-right corner of the “Grab Photo” screen.

“Grab Photo” screen, GoPro “Quik” app.

Choose the location where you would like to save the frame grab.

Select “Save to …” location, GoPro “Quik” app.

The frame grab is saved as an 8 MB JPG file, smaller than the 12 MB JPGs created when the camera is set for “Photo Mode.”

The file can be adjusted using your photo editor of choice, but there’s a limit to what you can do during post-processing of JPGs so it’s always a good idea to “get it right” in-camera.

Related Resources

Copyright © 2022 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

GoPro time lapse submodes

May 3, 2022

The GoPro HERO4 Black action camera features three ways to either create (in-camera) a simple, time lapse movie in MP4 format or shoot a time series of photos (JPGs) that can be used to create a time lapse movie during post-processing.

Video Mode

“Time Lapse Video” submode

“Time Lapse Video” is one of several submodes under “Video Mode,” as shown below. It’s the simplest way to create a time lapse movie using the HERO4 Black.

GoPro “Quik” app.

There are two user-selectable settings in the “Time Lapse Video” submode (shown below, highlighted by a green rectangle): Interval; and Resolution. I selected an interval of 1 second and a resolution of 4K at 30 frames per sec (fps).

Settings, “GoPro app” (v7.1)

The preceding screen capture from the “GoPro app” (v7.1) seems to suggest there are many more user-selectable settings in “Time Lapse Video” submode; there aren’t. Call it an artifact of lazy app coding. I call it confusing! For reference, see p. 20 in the GoPro HERO4 Black User Manual (shown below).

GoPro HERO4 Black | User Manual

When the GoPro HERO4 Black is set for “Time Lapse Video” submode, the camera records MP4 videos with a 16:9 aspect ratio (3,840 x 2,160 pixels). File size varies depending upon the duration of the video clips.

Try it. I think you’ll like it. Make the same settings that I used and start recording. Just be sure to record long enough to create a “Goldilocks movie,” that is one that isn’t too short and isn’t too long but is just right.

Standard video playback is typically 30 frames per sec in the USA. If you record every second for 30 seconds, your final movie will be 1 second long! Plan to record for at least 10 to 15 minutes.

Based upon my settings the camera created two video clips: the first is 17 seconds in duration; the last is 28 seconds. That’s a total of 45 seconds long, before I trimmed the video clips using Apple iMovie. In order to smooth the playback and lengthen the final movie a little, I used iMovie to adjust the playback speed to 25% of normal.

Multi-Shot Mode

“Time Lapse” and “Night Lapse Photo” submodes enable automated recording of photos that can be used to create a time lapse movie during post-processing.

GoPro HERO4 Black | User Manual

The two submodes are similar, with one key difference: both Interval and Shutter Speed are user-selectable in “Night Lapse Photo” submode; only Interval is user-selectable in “Time Lapse” submode. A wide range of other user-selectable settings are available in both submodes, including “Protune.”

GoPro HERO4 Black | User Manual

“Time Lapse” submode

Untested, so far. Please stay tuned.

GoPro “Quik” app.

“Night Lapse Photo” submode

GoPro “Quik” app.

I tested “Night Lapse Photo” submode on the same day I created the time lapse movie featured in my last blog post. In case you’re wondering why I used “Night Lapse Photo” to record a scene during the day, I did so based upon the camera settings recommended by a well-known time lapse photographer/videographer.

27 APR 2022 | 3:47 pm | DCIM100GOPROG0020165

168 JPG photos were recorded during a 14 minute time period starting at 3:47 pm and stopping at 4:01 pm.

27 APR 2022 | 4:01 pm | DCIM100GOPROG0020332

As you can see in the two sample photos (shown above), the sky was overexposed in all of the photos that were recorded. The Interval was set for five (5) seconds and set the Shutter Speed was set for Auto. Those settings might work for Mr. X but they didn’t work for me!

The GoPro HERO4 Black records JPG photos with a 4:3 aspect ratio (4,000 x 3,000 pixels). Each photo file is approximately 2.2 MB in size.

The GoPro HERO4 Black features a fixed lens with an aperture of f/2.8.

The 35mm equivalent focal length of the lens is 15mm. That’s a fairly wide angle lens, so it’s no wonder the preceding photos show some “fish eye” distortion.

Notice the Shutter Speed was 1/120 second. Although 1/120 s is a relatively slow shutter speed, it’s fast enough that it might not explain why my photos are overexposed.

The scene I recorded was relatively high contrast — it was dark in the parking garage and the white clouds in the sky were bright. It’s possible the “Center Weighted Average” Metering Mode was unable to expose the entire image properly.

I didn’t know that Photo Mode / Night Photo submode and Multi-Shot Mode / Night Lapse Photo submode are virtually identical. Next time I experiment with “Night Lapse Photo” I will shoot some test shots using “Night Photo” to be sure the exposure is set correctly before starting “Night Lapse Photo.”

That being said, I think my next experiment will test “Time Lapse” submode.

Copyright © 2022 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

More resources for editing GoPro video

April 19, 2022

Sometimes I’m a content creator; sometimes I share content created by others, especially when the content is better than I could create myself.

Apple iMovie: Magic Movie

The latest version of iMovie includes a new feature called “Magic Movie.” Although I’ve never used “Quik,” the GoPro pay-to-play app that makes it easier for beginner videographers to create movies, I think “Magic Movie” targets the same demographic and does essentially the same thing as “Quik.” Both “Quik” and “Magic Movie” enable the user to quickly combine photos, video clips, and music into a punchy little movies.

How to make a Magic Movie video in iMovie 3, by Roman Loyola, Senior Editor, Macworld explains how to use Magic Movie on iOS devices including iPad and iPhone. The article features detailed, step-by-step directions that are richly illustrated with an embedded video and lots of screenshots.

Apple QuickTime

Don’t sleep on “QuickTime,” a versatile free utility from Apple, that’s capable of doing some of the same things that were covered in my last two blog posts.

Grab a Single Frame from a Video in QuickTime X, by Jeff Geerling explains how to use QuickTime to do a frame grab from video, including video shot using a GoPro action camera.

QuickTime can be used to do simple video editing, as demonstrated in the following excellent video by Michael Kinney.

Copyright © 2022 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

GoProbe

April 12, 2022

The more I explore creative ways to use my GoPro HERO4 Black action camera, I realize there’s a lot I don’t know about the camera hardware, firmware, and “supporting” software.

A lot of the frustration and pain of being a GoPro user is inflicted by GoPro Inc. If I knew what I know now BEFORE I decided to buy a GoPro camera, I’m almost 100% certain I wouldn’t have gotten one. Long story short (and it is a long story), all I want to do is make the most of my regrettable decision.

Should you edit photos and videos using GoPro apps?

Before I went on “hiatus” last week (more about that another time), I had promised to do a post (or series of posts) related to how to edit photos and videos from a GoPro camera.

My next blog post will focus on how to edit photos and videos from your GoPro action camera. Source credit: More settings: GoPro HERO4 Black.

And as I mentioned in a GoPro related blog post a few weeks ago …

I plan to publish a series of follow-up posts. Tentative topics include how to update the camera’s firmware, how to edit video using the GoPro “Quik” app (sneak preview: don’t go there!), how to use your GoPro as a Webcam, as well as a few other suggested applications to get you started using your action camera. Source credit: GoProse.

I DO NOT recommend using the suite of GoPro apps to edit your photos and videos! That is, unless you like the subscription model for “buying” software. I don’t, especially when there are free alternatives.

Suite of GoPro apps on my Apple iPad mini 6.

Grab Photo

There is one noteworthy exception. When you use either the “GoPro app” or “GoPro Quik” app to remotely control your camera, you can save still photos from a video clip. For example, here’s how it works using “GoPro Quik” on my Apple iPad mini 6.

The first screen capture shows the “splash page” for GoPro Quik, running on my iPad mini 6. Tap the camera icon labeled “GoPro” located in the lower-right corner of the screen. The button works, despite the fact that it’s grayed out.

GoPro “Quik” app splash screen.

Next, tap the button labeled “Control Your GoPro” on the “Cameras” page.

“Cameras” screen, GoPro “Quik” app.

Tap the “Media Icon” located in the lower-right corner of the Live View screen (shown below, highlighted by a red square) in order to see photos and videos that you have recorded using your GoPro camera.

Live View, GoPro “Quik” app.

When you play a video clip shot with the camera and see a frame you’d like to grab, pause playback and tap the “Extract Photo Icon” located in the lower-middle of the screen (shown below, highlighted by a red square).

Video playback, GoPro “Quik” app.

You have the option to scrub through the video frame-by-frame (by using the left and right arrows) until you find a frame that you’d like to save as a photo. Then tap the blue “Save Frame” button located in the upper-right corner of the “Grab Photo” screen.

“Grab Photo” screen, GoPro “Quik” app.

Choose the location where you would like to save the frame grab.

Select “Save to …” location, GoPro “Quik” app.

The frame grab is saved as an 8 MB JPG file, smaller than the 12 MB JPGs created when the camera is set for “Photo Mode.”

The file can be adjusted using your photo editor of choice, but there’s a limit to what you can do during post-processing of JPGs so it’s always a good idea to “get it right” in-camera.

Related Resources

Copyright © 2022 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Settings: GoPro HERO4 Black

March 29, 2022

Let’s take stock of what we’ve accomplished as we work toward getting up-to-speed with our older GoPro action cameras: We recharged the battery or batteries and inserted a microSD memory card; paired the camera with GoPro “Quik” app; and updated the firmware. Now it’s time to make some settings and begin (again?) to use the GoPro to shoot photos and videos.

What are the best settings to use?

The best camera settings for shooting photos and videos using full-frame and crop-sensor digital cameras is highly subjective. It’s no different with action cameras — I’ve watched a lot of YouTube videos on the topic of GoPro camera settings and opinions vary widely. To a large extent, the settings you choose to use depends upon the intended use for the camera. I wish I had more experience using my GoPro so that I could share some wisdom — instead the best I can do is share some useful resources discovered while researching the topic.

How to make settings

Although it’s possible to operate the HERO4 Black model using the small LCD on the front of the camera … , it’s less than ideal for navigating menus and making settings. In my opinion, it’s much easier to pair the camera with either a smart phone or tablet running the GoPro “Quik” app and use one of those devices to control the camera remotely. Source credit: GoProse, by Walter Sanford.

Whenever possible, I prefer to use the GoPro “Quik” app to make settings. Sometimes we have no choice other than to make settings manually. For example, Protune settings. You might be wondering, “What is Protune?” The name makes me think it’s related to camera audio, but no-o-o-o-o, the Protune settings enable the user to shoot higher quality photos and videos. And you can’t make those settings using the GoPro “Quik” app. Wait, what?

GoPro Inc. is being sued for patent infringement by Contour IP Holding, LLC.

Therefore, the court agreed with Contour’s claim that GoPro’s remote app infringes on the technology patents and has done so since 2014. Source credit: Contour IP Holding, LLC v. GoPro, Inc. | Dunlap Bennett & Ludwig PLLC – JDSupra.

GoPro Inc. deleted the Protune settings from what was then called the “GoPro app” (now called “GoPro Quik”) beginning with v7.3.1, updated on 07 January 2021. Two things are worth noting here. The Protune settings are still featured on the camera, but you have to set them manually. That is unless you purchase a third-party app, or like me, you happen to have an older version of the “GoPro app” on your iOS device.

GoPro apps on my Apple iPad mini 2.

I have a copy of v7.1 on my iPad mini 2 (shown above) — the Protune settings are still included (shown below) and the app can be used set them remotely.

Protune Video Settings.

The first screen capture from the “GoPro app” (v7.1) shows the default Protune video settings; the second screen capture shows the default Protune photo settings.

Protune Photo Settings

The third screen capture from the “GoPro app” (v7.1) shows more settings.

More Settings

Doing it the old-fashioned way

Hero4 Black: How To Set Up Protune – GoPro Tip #507 by Mic Bergsma (3:13) is a video that shows how to make Protune settings manually by navigating the small LCD on the front of the camera. Mic is a well-known GoPro user who is hearing-impaired, so there is no narration. The show notes for the video feature a detailed explanation of each setting.

Looking ahead

I’ll talk more about settings when we start exploring some suggested applications to get you started using your action camera. In the meantime, I recommend you get started changing some or all of the default Protune settings — it will take a while to do manually!

Related Resources

Copyright © 2022 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Firmware update: GoPro HERO4 Black

March 25, 2022

If you own a GoPro action camera that hasn’t been used in a few years, then it’s possible you need to update the firmware.

How can you tell whether the firmware on your camera is up-to-date? Well, if you followed the recommendation in my last blog post to pair your camera with the GoPro “Quik” app, then the software will remind you every time you “Control Your GoPro” until you update the firmware.

Screen capture from “Quik” running on my Apple iPad mini 6.

The simplest way to find the current firmware version of my HERO4 Black is to look closely at the tiny LCD on the front of the camera body when I press the “Power/Mode Button” (front) to turn on the camera. The LCD isn’t backlighted so you need to be working with the camera in a well-lighted area. Watch closely — the version number is displayed briefly at the bottom of the screen during the startup sequence.

My HERO4 Black was running firmware v03.00 before I updated to v05.00. The new version enables “Karma” compatibility and adds “Linear FOV.” Hey GoPro — how’s that Karma thing working out for you? Seems like it might be bad karma to name a commercial product “Karma.” I’m just saying. But I digress. I don’t own a GoPro Karma drone but I will want to use “Linear FOV” when my HERO4 Black is used as a Webcam, so I decided to update the firmware.

How to update your HERO4

How to update your HERO4, a reference document from GoPro Customer Support, says there are three ways to update your HERO4.

  1. Using the GoPro app [now named “Quik“]
  2. Manually
  3. Quik for desktop [According to GoPro, “Quik for desktop is no longer under development.“]

In fact there are only two ways to update the firmware. I chose option No. 2 because I am used to manually updating the firmware for my Fujifilm digital cameras using a similar process.

Manual update

Visit the Update your GoPro support page where you will provide the 14-digit serial number and register your camera. The serial number is located inside the battery compartment of the camera. You will need to remove the battery in order to see the serial number — it is shown in two rows with seven-digits in each row. Enter all 14 digits, no spaces. Then click the button labeled “Next Step >”.

Download the firmware update to your computer and unzip the UPDATE.ZIP file by double-clicking on it. You should see a new folder called “UPDATE” that contains three files.

I strongly recommend reformating the microSD card in your GoPro before proceeding with the firmware update, although GoPro doesn’t specifically say this step is necessary.

Insert the microSD card in your computer (using the SD card adapter that came with the memory card). Next, drag-and-drop the entire “UPDATE” folder onto the icon for the microSD card on your computer. After the folder is copied from your computer to the microSD card, eject the memory card.

Be sure your GoPro is powered-off before you insert the microSD card in the camera! Insert the memory card and power-on the camera. Then relax and watch the small LCD screen on the front of the camera until you see a notification that tells you the firmware was updated successfully. Resist the urge to press any buttons during the update process — that probably ends badly!

After you are 100% certain the update is complete, I recommend you reformat the microSD card in order to avoid some strange behavior that I experienced the next time I powered-on the camera. The LCD showed HERO4, otherwise my camera just sat there. No buttons worked. It’s as though the GoPro were trying to update the firmware again. Weird!

Related Resources

Copyright © 2022 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

 

GoProse

March 22, 2022

Maybe you’re like me and have an older GoPro action camera that you aren’t using, such as my GoPro HERO4 Black camera (shown below).

GoPro Hero4 Black action camera, plus QuickClip mount.

Or maybe you’re like several people I know who bought a GoPro and have never used it.

Either way, maybe you’d like to begin using your GoPro camera but aren’t sure how to get started. In this post (as well as a series of follow-up posts), I plan to share some practical advice based upon my recent experience getting up-to-speed again.

Getting started

The first thing you need to do is charge the rechargeable battery that came with your GoPro. Here’s how it works on my GoPro HERO4 Black. Open the battery door on the bottom of the camera, insert the battery, and close the door. Use the power cable that came with the camera (Mini-USB to USB) to connect the camera to either a computer or low-power USB port (5V 1A). A red LED is on when the battery is charging; off when the battery is fully charged.

Next insert a microSD memory card in the microSD card slot on the side of the camera.

Remote control

The GoPro HERO4 Silver and Black cameras are two similar models, each of which has advantages and disadvantages. The Silver model has an LCD on the back of the camera, but shoots lower quality 4K video. The Black model lacks the LCD but shoots higher quality 4K video. I decided to buy the Black model because I wanted to be able to shoot higher quality 4K video.

Although it’s possible to operate the HERO4 Black model using the small LCD on the front of the camera (shown above), it’s less than ideal for navigating menus and making settings. In my opinion, it’s much easier to pair the camera with either a smart phone or tablet running the GoPro “Quik” app and use one of those devices to control the camera remotely.

Pairing your camera with GoPro “Quik” app

Pairing your GoPro with another device is by far the most challenging task you need to complete in order to get up-and-running, but doing so will make it easier for you to get the most from your action camera.

I wish I could provide a simple, step-by-step guide that explains how it’s done, but I can’t because there are many GoPro camera models and the procedure varies depending upon the camera model you own.

What I can tell you is the best way to “get ‘er done” is to launch the GoPro “Quik” app and follow the on-screen directions for pairing your camera model with GoPro “Quik.” Take it slowly, and follow the directions exactly. This method worked for me.

Or you might try following the directions for your specific camera model provided on this Web page from GoPro Support: GoPro Quik: Pair Your Camera. This method didn’t work for me — your experience might be different.

Here’s an overview of what will happen during the pairing process. Initially your camera and the GoPro “Quik” app communicate via Bluetooth. You will use the app to give your camera a name and password, then you will look in Settings / Wi-Fi on your device for the name of your camera and join the camera’s Wi-Fi network.

Finally you will go back to the “Quik” app, connect with the camera, and “Control Your GoPro” remotely. “GoProHERO4Black” is the name I gave my camera. Notice that “Quik” correctly displays an image of a HERO4!

Screen capture from “Quik” running on my Apple iPad mini 6.

If everything works the way it should, then “Quik” should show a live view from your camera such as the following breathtaking view through my living room window. The live view display works in either portrait mode (shown below) or landscape mode.

Screen capture from “Quik” running on my Apple iPad mini 6.

Pairing my HERO4 Black with my Apple iPad mini tablets

The following YouTube video shows how the pairing process works with a GoPro HERO4: GoPro HERO4 – How to Connect to the GoPro APP for the First Time, by Brynmag Productions (4:36). It’s surprising how well a video published in November 2014 has withstood the test of time!

Baby steps, Bob

As I mentioned at the outset of this blog post, I plan to publish a series of follow-up posts. Tentative topics include how to update the camera’s firmware, how to edit video using the GoPro “Quik” app (sneak preview: don’t go there!), how to use your GoPro as a Webcam, as well as a few other suggested applications to get you started using your action camera.

But I don’t want you to feel overwhelmed at first so let’s stop for now. Try to pair your camera with the GoPro “Quik” app by Friday, 25 March 2022 (at the latest) and you’ll be ready to follow along when my next blog post is online.

Related Resources

Copyright © 2022 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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