Posts Tagged ‘Green Frog’

Green Frogs

November 3, 2015

Several Green Frogs (Lithobates clamitans) were spotted at the “Amphibian Pool,” located behind the Visitor Center at Huntley Meadows Park. These individuals may be Bronze Frogs, a subspecies of Green Frog.

The first photo shows two frogs: the one on the upper-right might be a male; the one on the lower-left is probably a female.

Males also possess a larger tympanum and stouter forelegs and thumbs than females. Source Credit: Green Frog, Virginia Herpetological Society.

Two Green Frogs (Lithobates clamitans) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. These individuals may be Bronze Frogs, a subspecies of Green Frog.

21 OCT 2015 | Huntley Meadows Park | Green Frogs

The next individual is probably another male. The green aquatic plant is duckweed. Duckweed oxygenates the water and provides shelter for animals like frogs.

A Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual may be a Bronze Frog, a subspecies of Green Frog. The green aquatic plant is duckweed.

21 OCT 2015 | Huntley Meadows Park | Green Frog

The last individual may be another female.

A Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual may be a Bronze Frog, a subspecies of Green Frog. The green aquatic plant is duckweed.

21 OCT 2015 | Huntley Meadows Park | Green Frog

Copyright © 2015 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Green Frog (male, calling)

January 11, 2015

I spotted a Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans) along the boardwalk in the hemi-marsh at Huntley Meadows Park on 25 May 2014. This individual is a male, as indicated by the size of its tympanum (eardrum).

Females and males can be differentiated by the size of the tympanum (the eardrum, located behind the eye and below the dorsolateral ridge). In females, it is about the same size as the eye and in males it is much larger than the eye. Source Credit: Northern green frog, a Project Noah spotting by Kara Curtain/Jones, graduate student and teaching assistant at George Mason University, Department of Environmental Science and Policy.

Tech Tip: The preceding video looks better viewed in full-screen mode.

Related Resources: Some species of amphibians, such as Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer), are heard more often than seen. In 2014, I resolved to learn the calls of many of the amphibians that are common at Huntley Meadows Park. The following alphabetical list provides quick links to audio recordings of several species of frogs and toads of Virginia, courtesy Virginia Herpetological Society.

Test your skill in identifying frog calls by visiting the USGS Frog Quizzes Web page. Be forewarned: The quizzes are challenging! Refer to Virginia is for Frogs for more frog-related resources including Teacher’s Corner, featuring ideas for lesson plans and activities.

Copyright © 2015 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Green Frog (female)

January 9, 2015

I photographed a Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans) alongside the boardwalk in the hemi-marsh at Huntley Meadows Park on 02 April 2014. This individual is probably a female, as indicated by the size of its tympanum (eardrum).

Green frogs are variable in color and pattern, but can be differentiated from similar species — such as bullfrogs and leopard frogs — by the dorsolateral ridges that run from behind each eye to about three-quarters of the way down the back. In leopard frogs, the ridge continues all the way down the back and bullfrogs lack these ridges altogether. Females and males can be differentiated by the size of the tympanum (the eardrum, located behind the eye and below the dorsolateral ridge). In females, it is about the same size as the eye and in males it is much larger than the eye. Source Credit: Northern green frog, a Project Noah spotting by Kara Curtain/Jones, graduate student and teaching assistant at George Mason University, Department of Environmental Science and Policy.

Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans)

Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans)

Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans)

Copyright © 2015 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Common Ribbonsnake (eating a frog)

September 23, 2013

Common Ribbonsnake eating a frog

The preceding photograph shows a Common Ribbonsnake (Thamnophis sauritus sauritus) eating a Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans), spotted along the boardwalk that goes through the central wetland area at Huntley Meadows Park.

Copyright © 2013 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Green Frog

June 20, 2011
Img_2653_aperture

A Green Frog (Lithobates clamitans) spotted during a photowalk through Huntley Meadows Park. This individual may be a Bronze Frog, a subspecies of Green Frog. The green aquatic plant is duckweed. Duckweed oxygenates the water and provides shelter for animals like frogs.


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