Posts Tagged ‘habitat generalist’

Another unknown species of odonate exuvia

November 4, 2019

Another odonate exuvia was collected by Michael Powell during a photowalk with me on 01 June 2019 at Occoquan Regional Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. The genus and species is unknown.

Occoquan Regional Park | unknown species | exuvia (face-head)

This specimen might be a member of Family Libellulidae (Skimmers), as indicated by its labium (face mask) and pointy eyes.

Although this exuvia looks similar to the other one that Mike collected on 01 June 2019, it’s smaller and probably not another Slaty Skimmer (L. incesta) exuvia. Many species of skimmers are habitat generalists; the small pond where both exuviae were found is a perfect spot for many members of this family.

The photo (shown above) is a one-off, not a composite image. I plan to create higher quality composite images of this exuvia, shown from all viewpoints including dorsal, ventral, and lateral views. The composite images and one or more dichotomous keys will be used to attempt to identify the genus/species of the specimen.

Related Resource: Vimeo video: Identifying dragonfly larva to family (8:06).

Tech Tips

The following equipment was used to shoot the quick-and-dirty macro photograph featured in this post: Fujifilm X-T1 digital camera; Fujifilm MCEX-11 extension tube; and Fujinon XF80mm macro lens plus lens hood. The camera was set for both manual exposure and manual focus. That’s right, a switch on the camera body is used to set the type of focus. It’s a Fujifilm thing. Camera settings: focal length 80mm (120mm, 35mm equivalent); ISO 200; f/16; 1/180s.

Godox X2TF radio flash trigger, mounted on the hotshoe of my X-T1, was used to control two off-camera external flash units set for radio slave mode: Godox TT685F Thinklite TTL Flash (manual mode); and Godox TT685o/p Thinklite Flash for Olympus/Panasonic Cameras (manual mode). Both flash units were fitted with a Lastolite Ezybox Speed-Lite 2 flash modifier.

Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to spot-heal and sharpen the image.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Slaty Skimmer dragonfly (mature male)

August 28, 2019

A Slaty Skimmer dragonfly (Libellula incesta) was spotted at Painted Turtle Pond, Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA.

This individual is a mature male, as indicated by his dark coloration and terminal appendages.

16 AUG 2019 | Occoquan Bay NWR | Slaty Skimmer (mature male)

Habitat preference

Slaty Skimmer is a habitat generalist that can be found virtually anywhere there is water, such as a mid-size pond like Painted Turtle Pond.

This species is a true habitat generalist; only whitetails and pondhawks can be found in as many different habitat types. I’ve seen Slaties along river edges, sunny sections of woodland streams, ponds, lakes, swamps, old roads and flooded meadows. Dragonflies of summer, if you’re in any of these habitats June through September, you’re likely to come face to face with a Slaty Skimmer. Source Credit: Dragonflies of Northern Virginia, by Kevin Munroe.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Another summer species of odonate

May 29, 2018

Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) is another summer species of odonate that appears in Northern Virginia in late spring. The following individual — spotted at Hidden Pond during a photowalk at Meadowood Recreation Area (MRA), Fairfax County, Virginia USA — is a male, as indicated by his coloration and terminal appendages.

Blue Dasher is a habitat generalist that “can be found almost anywhere there is still water.” Source Credit: Species Pachydiplax longipennis – Blue Dasher.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Variable Dancer (mating pair, “in heart”)

November 23, 2016

A mating pair of Variable Dancer damselflies (Argia fumipennis violacea) was spotted at Mulligan Pond, Jackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge (JMAWR). This pair is “in heart“: the male is on the upper-left; the female on the lower-right.

A mating pair of Variable Dancer damselflies (Argia fumipennis violacea) spotted at Mulligan Pond, Jackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is "in heart."

14 JUN 2016 | JMAWR | Variable Dancer (mating pair, “in heart“)

In the following photo, the male is on top; the female on the bottom.

A mating pair of Variable Dancer damselflies (Argia fumipennis violacea) spotted at Mulligan Pond, Jackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is "in heart."

14 JUN 2016 | JMAWR | Variable Dancer (mating pair, “in heart“)

The taxonomic classification of Variable Dancer is as follows: Order Odonata (Dragonflies and Damselflies); Suborder Zygoptera (Damselflies); Family Coenagrionidae (Narrow-winged Damselflies); Genus Argia (Dancers); Subspecies Argia fumipennis violacea (Violet Dancer).

Variable Dancer is a habitat generalist that can be found almost anywhere there is water. Mature males are easy to recognize due to their unique coloration — there are no other species of violet damselflies found in the eastern one-third of the United States. Female Variable Dancers, like many female odonates, are more challenging to identify than males.

It’s helpful to get shots of mating pairs of damselflies, especially “in tandem,” since males and females of the same species can look quite different. The excellent high-resolution digital scans by Gayle and Jeanelle Strickland, listed under “Related Resources” (below), provide clear views of male and female Variable Dancer damselflies.

Related Resources: High-resolution digital scans created by Gayle and Jeanelle Strickland.

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

The first and last dragonflies of 2015

December 1, 2015

Common Whitetail dragonflies (Plathemis lydia) are like the type of party guests who are always among the first to arrive and last to leave. They are one of the first dragonfly species to appear in spring, and one of the last to disappear in fall.

A Common Whitetail dragonfly (Libellula lydia, Plathemis lydia) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female.

24 APR 2015 | Huntley Meadows Park | Common Whitetail (female)

This post features photos of the first and last Common Whitetail dragonflies spotted during photowalks in two remote locations at Huntley Meadows Park. Both individuals are female, as indicated by their coloration, pattern of wing spots, and terminal appendages.

A Common Whitetail dragonfly (Plathemis lydia) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female.

15 OCT 2015 | Huntley Meadows Park | Common Whitetail (female)

As its common name suggests Common Whitetail dragonflies are seen commonly, seemingly everywhere, including places far from water. Some dragonflies are habitat specialists; Common Whitetails are habitat generalists. It’s easy to look at something so common and overlook their subtle beauty, that is, until they disappear at the end of dragonfly season.

Don’t it always seem to go that you don’t know what you’ve got ’til it’s gone. Source Credit: Big Yellow Taxi, by Joni Mitchell.

Editor’s Notes: For the record, the first dragonfly of 2015 was spotted on 18 April, when Mike Powell and I co-discovered the first Springtime Darner (Basiaeschna janata) ever seen/photographed at Huntley Meadows ParkAutumn Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum vicinum) is the last dragonfly species spotted in 2015: 11 November is my personal late-date for this species in 2015; several other odonate enthusiasts have seen Autumn Meadowhawks at Huntley Meadows long afterward.

Copyright © 2015 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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