Posts Tagged ‘Huntley Meadows Park’

A good spot for spiketails and emeralds

April 23, 2018

21 APR 2017 | Huntley Meadows Park | Little Hunting Creek

The preceding photo shows a view of the forest, seen from the banks of Little Hunting Creek as it flows through Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. The forest floor is carpeted with Spring Beauty wildflowers (Claytonia virginica).

Little Hunting Creek is a good place to look for Twin-spotted Spiketail dragonflies (Cordulegaster maculata). Arrowhead Spiketail dragonflies (Cordulegaster obliqua) and Mocha Emerald dragonflies (Somatochlora linearis) have been observed at the same site.

Tech Tip: I used my Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150 superzoom camera to shoot the landscape photo featured in this blog post. The camera was set for manual focus at the hyperfocal distance for an aperture of f/4, based upon the instructions provided in the excellent video tutorial by Graham Houghton, “Panasonic Lumix FZ camera easier manual focus method — super point-and-shoot tip.”

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

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Male Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies

February 4, 2018

On the same day that I saw a male Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum) with an eye injury, one or more other males were photographed at the same location in Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male)

Please look at the full-size version of each photo in order to fully appreciate these handsome little devils!

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male)

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male)

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male)

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male)

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Familiar Bluet damselfly (female)

February 2, 2018

A Familiar Bluet damselfly (Enallagma civile) was spotted near a drainage ditch at a remote location in Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female.

The damselfly appears to be eating a smaller black insect, possibly a spider.

Editor’s Note: Sincere thanks to Mike Boatwright for verifying my tentative identification of the damselfly.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Eye injury

January 31, 2018

A Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum) was spotted near a vernal pool at remote location in Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, as indicated by his terminal appendages.

When I post-processed the RAW images of the male dragonfly I noticed he has an eye injury, highlighted in the following annotated image.

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male, with eye injury)

(See a full-size version of the original photo, without annotation.)

The eye injury can be seen in two more photos of the same male.

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male, with eye injury)

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male, with eye injury)

Related Resource: Eye injury, a blog post by Walter Sanford, featuring photos of a female andromorph Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly spotted on 18 September 2013 along the boardwalk of the central wetland area at Huntley Meadows Park.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Another black snake

January 19, 2018

A few days before I spotted the black snake featured in my last blog post, I saw another black snake at the same location in Huntley Meadows Park. In fact, I was so focused on searching for Great Spreadwing damselflies that I almost stepped on the snake!

This individual is probably an Eastern Ratsnake (Pantherophis alleghaniensis), as indicated by the appearance of its eyes.

22 OCT 2017 | Huntley Meadows Park | black snake

My close encounter of the startling kind shows the snake slithering along a carpet of leaf litter on the ground, heading toward one of several man-made brush piles near a vernal pool at a remote location in the park.

The last two photos show the snake moving around inside the brush pile. According to Kevin Munroe, former manager at Huntley Meadows Park, brush piles are “like a natural cupboard” where snakes hunt for small rodents.

22 OCT 2017 | Huntley Meadows Park | black snake

Eastern Ratsnakes have keeled scales, shown clearly in the full-size version of the preceding photo.

Keeled scales refer to reptile scales that, rather than being smooth, have a ridge down the center that may or may not extend to the tip of the scale, making them rough to the touch. Source Credit: Keeled scales, Wikipedia.

Thanks to Timothy Deering for sharing this field marker in a comment on my last blog post.

22 OCT 2017 | Huntley Meadows Park | black snake

Related Resource: Black snake, a blog post by Walter Sanford.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Black snake

January 17, 2018

A black snake was spotted basking on a man-made brush pile at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is either an Eastern Ratsnake (Pantherophis alleghaniensis) or Northern Black Racer (Coluber constrictor constrictor).

25 OCT 2017 | Huntley Meadows Park | black snake

According to Kevin Munroe, former manager at Huntley Meadows Park, Eastern Ratsnake can be differentiated from Northern Black Racer by looking at their eyes.

Northern Black Racers have a huge, all-black eye with an “eye-brow” ridge (makes racers look angry and somewhat dangerous all the time), while ratsnakes have noticeably smaller eyes with a black/white pupil/iris pattern (which makes them look more friendly/human). Also racers would never sit still long enough for you to take pictures, or at least it would be harder. Ratsnakes are pretty laid-back and easy to approach, while racers are very skittish and quick to flee. Ratsnakes mostly eat small mammals and young birds/eggs, while racers feed mainly on other herps like snakes, lizards and frogs. Ratsnakes are stealth/tracking hunters that smell out nests of young rodents and birds, while racers are active chasers/hunters/sprinters, which may be why they have such different personalities. Source Credit: Kevin Munroe.

25 OCT 2017 | Huntley Meadows Park | black snake

Based upon Kevin’s guidance, I think this individual is an Eastern Ratsnake.

25 OCT 2017 | Huntley Meadows Park | black snake

Another black snake was spotted on the ground, about 20 feet from the brush pile. The snake wasn’t moving, but the vegetation was too dense to get a clear view of the subject.

Related Resource: Another black snake, a blog post by Walter Sanford.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Resting on a Coleman camp stool

January 13, 2018

In addition to my photography gear, I usually carry a Coleman camp stool when I go photowalking. The small, lightweight folding chair is good for resting while waiting for “the game to come to me.” The camp stool also enables me to get closer to subjects either on- or near the ground. And I think it’s easier to hold my camera rock-steady when I’m sitting on the chair with my elbows resting on my knees.

I like my Coleman camp stool. Some of my favorite insects like to rest on the camp stool too!

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Autumn Meadowhawk (male, perching on a stool)

An Autumn Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum vicinum) was spotted near a vernal pool at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, perching on a Coleman camp stool.

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Autumn Meadowhawk (male, perching on a stool)

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Autumn Meadowhawk (male, perching on a stool)

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies (mating pairs, in wheel)

January 11, 2018

Several mating pairs of Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum vicinum) were spotted during a photowalk around a vernal pool at a remote location in Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Autumn Meadowhawk (mating pair, “in wheel“)

Both pairs are “in wheel“: the male is on top; the female is on the bottom.

All odonates (dragonflies and damselflies) have a 10-segmented abdomen, numbered from front to back. Male dragonfly secondary genitalia, called hamules, are located in segments two and three (S2 and S3); female genitalia in segment eight (S8). Dragonflies form the mating wheel in order for their genitalia to connect during copulation.

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Autumn Meadowhawk (mating pair, “in wheel“)

Editor’s Note: Careful readers may be thinking “Hey, wait a minute — you said you spotted several mating pairs, but the post features photos of just two pairs.” Good catch! The photos of two more mating pairs didn’t make the final cut because the focus was slightly soft in all of those photos.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Dragonflies and Damselflies (poster, slideshow)

January 3, 2018

 

D R A G O N F L I E S  A N D  D A M S E L F L I E S
HUNTLEY MEADOWS PARK

W A L T E R  S A N F O R D
Educator | Naturalist | Photographer

 

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Top 10 Photos of 2017

January 1, 2018

The following gallery shows 32 finalists for my “Top 10 Photos of 2017.” The photos are presented in reverse-chronological order beginning in November 2017 and ending in April 2017.

The Top 10 photos will be selected using reader feedback. Please enter a comment at the end of this post listing the number for each of your 10 favorite photos. If listing 10 photos is asking too much, then please list at least five photos, e.g., No. 5, 8, 14, 17, 21, etc. Thanks for sharing your selections, and thanks for following my photoblog!

No. 1

No. 2

No. 3

27 OCT 2017 | MRA | Autumn Meadowhawk (mating pair, “in tandem“)

No. 4

No. 5

No. 6

No. 7

No. 8

No. 9

No. 10

No. 11

No. 12

No. 13

No. 14

No. 15

No. 16

No. 17

No. 18

No. 19

No. 20

No. 21

20 JUN 2017 | OBNWR | Calico Pennant (immature male)

No. 22

No. 23

10 MAY 2017 | HORP | crayfish (underwater)

No. 24

No. 25

No. 26

No. 27

No. 28

No. 29

No. 30

No. 31

No. 32

Editor’s Note: The following location codes are used in some photo captions, shown above.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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