Posts Tagged ‘hyperfocal distance’

A good spot for spiketails and emeralds

April 23, 2018

21 APR 2017 | Huntley Meadows Park | Little Hunting Creek

The preceding photo shows a view of the forest, seen from the banks of Little Hunting Creek as it flows through Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. The forest floor is carpeted with Spring Beauty wildflowers (Claytonia virginica).

Little Hunting Creek is a good place to look for Twin-spotted Spiketail dragonflies (Cordulegaster maculata). Arrowhead Spiketail dragonflies (Cordulegaster obliqua) and Mocha Emerald dragonflies (Somatochlora linearis) have been observed at the same site.

Tech Tip: I used my Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150 superzoom camera to shoot the landscape photo featured in this blog post. The camera was set for manual focus at the hyperfocal distance for an aperture of f/4, based upon the instructions provided in the excellent video tutorial by Graham Houghton, “Panasonic Lumix FZ camera easier manual focus method — super point-and-shoot tip.”

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

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Different point of view

January 15, 2018

The first photo shows “The Osprey’s at Belmont Bay,” as seen from the opposite side of Belmont Bay. “The Osprey’s” community shares a common boundary with Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, located to the left of this photo.

11 JAN 2018 | Prince William County, VA | The Osprey’s at Belmont Bay

The next photo shows the near shoreline of Belmont Bay. The bay is almost completely covered by ice after two weeks of below-freezing temperatures.

11 JAN 2018 | Fairfax County, VA | Belmont Bay

Notice the duck blind located in the water.

11 JAN 2018 | Fairfax County, VA | Belmont Bay

The following photo shows a dock and boat ramp located at the mouth of a small stream that is a tributary of Belmont Bay.

11 JAN 2018 | Fairfax County, VA | dock and boat ramp

The next photo is located upstream from the dock and boat ramp.

11 JAN 2018 | Fairfax County, VA | small tributary of Belmont Bay

The last photo shows a location far upstream from Belmont Bay. The stream is located at the bottom of a steep-sided valley.

11 JAN 2018 | Fairfax County, VA | small tributary of Belmont Bay

Tech Tip: I used my Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150 superzoom camera to shoot the landscape photos featured in this blog post. The camera was set for manual focus at the hyperfocal distance for an aperture of f/4, based upon the instructions provided in the excellent video tutorial by Graham Houghton, “Panasonic Lumix FZ camera easier manual focus method — super point-and-shoot tip.”

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Bridge across Marumsco Creek

November 20, 2017

I think I must have been an explorer in a past life. When odonate-hunting season ends, I like to explore new places to hunt for dragonflies and damselflies during the next year, such as Marumsco Creek, Prince William County, Virginia USA.

16 NOV 2017 | VMRP | bridge across Marumsco Creek

The preceding photograph shows a small bridge across Marumsco Creek, accessible from Veterans Memorial Regional Park (VMRP). If you were to cross the bridge and continue walking along Highams Court, then you would end up at the intersection with Dawson Beach Road, near Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge.

A close look at a trail map of Occoquan Bay NWR shows Marumsco Creek forms one of the natural boundaries of the refuge. Marumsco Creek, mostly located in restricted areas of Occoquan Bay NWR, is practically inaccessible from the refuge. Veterans Memorial Regional Park features a wooded trail located alongside Marumsco Creek. Access problem solved!

Directions: Jefferson Davis Highway (U.S. Route 1) to Featherstone Road. Immediately after a railroad crossing, bear left on Featherstone Road. Featherstone Road morphs into Veteran’s Drive at the boundary of Veterans Memorial Regional Park: same road; new name.

Tech Tip: I used my Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150 superzoom camera to shoot the landscape photo featured in this blog post. The camera was set for manual focus at the hyperfocal distance for an aperture of f/4, based upon the instructions provided in the excellent video tutorial by Graham Houghton, “Panasonic Lumix FZ camera easier manual focus method — super point-and-shoot tip.”

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

The Road Taken

November 14, 2017

Two ruts converged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth…

With sincere apologies to Robert Frost for slight modification of the title and first stanza of his famous poem The Road Not Taken in order to convey my impressions of Fall 2017 at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge.

Tech Tip: I used my Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150 superzoom camera to shoot the landscape photo featured in this blog post. The camera was set for manual focus at the hyperfocal distance for an aperture of f/4, based upon the instructions provided in the excellent video tutorial by Graham Houghton, “Panasonic Lumix FZ camera easier manual focus method — super point-and-shoot tip.”

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Lentic and lotic

October 3, 2017

Doesn’t this idyllic place look like ideal habitat for lotic species of odonates? It is!

Lotic refers to flowing water, from the Latin lotus, washed. … Lotic ecosystems can be contrasted with lentic ecosystems, which involve relatively still terrestrial waters such as lakes and ponds. Source Credit: River ecosystem, Wikipedia.

The preceding photo shows the stream crossing at Popes Head Creek, Hemlock Overlook Regional Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA (facing downstream toward Bull Run). Both streams provide ideal habitat for many species of dragonflies and damselflies that prefer flowing water rather than still water.

Tech Tip: I used my Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150 superzoom camera to shoot the landscape photo featured in this blog post. The camera was set for manual focus at the hyperfocal distance for an aperture of f/4, based upon the instructions provided in the excellent video tutorial by Graham Houghton, “Panasonic Lumix FZ camera easier manual focus method — super point-and-shoot tip.”

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Country Beaver, City Beaver

April 5, 2016

Remember “Country Mouse, City Mouse,” one of Aesop’s Fables? In this case, the familiar short story has been repurposed for the North American Beavers (Castor canadensis) that inhabit the wetlands of Huntley Meadows Park.

City Beaver

City beaver lives in two “buildings” located along the thoroughfare through the heart of the park: the boardwalk in the central wetland area. The following photo shows one of two active beaver lodges located along the boardwalk; this lodge can be seen from the observation tower overlooking the central wetland area. The other lodge overlaps the beginning of the boardwalk — believe me, you can’t miss it!

The next photo shows a zoomed-in view of the same beaver lodge, viewed from the observation tower.

The last photo in this subset shows the same beaver lodge as seen from ground level in the central wetland area.

Country Beaver

Country beaver lives far from the madding crowd, in one (maybe two) lodge(s) located along Barnyard Run, far downstream from the central wetland area. The “primary structure,” shown below, is the original lodge built alongside a long dam across the stream.

A “secondary structure,” located closer to the beaver dam, might be a newer lodge. Looking at these two photos, it appears as though the original lodge isn’t being actively maintained. Perhaps the new structure is either a mother-in-law house or summer cottage!

Look closely at the full-size version of the last photo in this subset — a landscape shot showing the environment in which “Country Beaver” lives. Can you see both the primary- and secondary structures on the far side of the beaver pond?

The Backstory (for the preceding photo): I was field testing a technique for focusing at the hyperfocal distance using my Fujifilm X-T1 digital camera and Fujinon XF18-55mm (27mm-82.5mm, 35mm equivalent) zoom lens. The camera was set for manual exposure and manual focus. I couldn’t read the distance scale on the LCD in bright sunlight so I wasn’t sure the lens was adjusted to a distance of ~5 feet, the hyperfocal distance for 18mm at f/11. Turns out I was focused at ~7 feet rather than 5 feet, but it’s OK to focus a little farther than the hyperfocal distance — it’s like cheap insurance most of the photo will be acceptably in focus. Just to be sure, I switched to f/16 before taking the shot! The scene was in focus from 2′ 3.2” to infinity. I lost about a foot of depth-of-field (toward the foreground) but ended up cropping a little of the foreground anyway. The technique seems to work well and I’m satisfied with the results of my quick-and-dirty field test.

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Mulligan Pond

February 27, 2016

The following photorealistic 32-bit HDR image of Mulligan Pond, Jackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge, is a composite of three bracketed exposures, +/- two stops of exposure.

A 32-bit HDR composite image created from three photos of Mulligan Pond, Jackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA, +/- two stops of exposure.

20 FEB 2016 | Jackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge | Mulligan Pond

Jackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge is located along Dogue Creek, downstream from the southeastern boundary of Huntley Meadows Park.

The wetland refuge is open to the public, although signs such as the one shown below are a sobering reminder that the property belongs to the U.S. Army. The danger is real, according to John Pilcicki, Natural Resource Specialist, U.S. Army Garrison Fort Belvoir, and visitors should stay on the marked trail.

Signage at Jackson Mile Abbott Wetland Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

20 FEB 2016 | Jackson Mile Abbott Wetland Refuge | Signage

Tech Tips: I used my Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150 superzoom camera to shoot three bracketed exposures of the same landscape. The camera was set for manual focus at the hyperfocal distance for an aperture of f/4, based upon the instructions provided in the excellent video tutorial by Graham Houghton, “Panasonic Lumix FZ camera easier manual focus method — super point-and-shoot tip.” I used Adobe Photoshop CC (2015) and Lightroom CC (2015) to create and edit a 32-bit HDR composite image of the three exposures: Photoshop was used to create the HDR image; Lightroom was used to adjust the composite image. The final version was exported from Lightroom as a 16-bit TIFF and imported into Aperture for some finishing touches.

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Vernal pool

November 12, 2014

2014 is the “Year of the Vernal Pool.” Unofficially, that is. 2014 is the year I discovered that many animals — many habitat-specific odonates in particular — prefer vernal pools. In fact, a quick look at my blog posts tagged with the phrase “vernal pool” shows the oldest post is dated April 2014.

What is a vernal pool?

Vernal pools, also known as ephemeral wetlands, prairie potholes, whale wallows, sinks, and kettles are rain-filled depressions that amphibians use for breeding and laying egg masses. These pools can be as small as a puddle. They fill with water in the spring and are usually dried up by June or July. The reason some amphibians use these areas for breeding and laying egg masses is simple — they lack predators (fish) that eat their larvae. Source Credit: Amphibians and Vernal Pools, National Park Service.

Although the preceding quotation is focused on the reason amphibians prefer vernal pools, many odonates prefer fishless pools for the same reason as amphibians.

What does a vernal pool look like?

Many recent posts in my photoblog feature the phrase, “spotted near a vernal pool in the forest at Huntley Meadows Park.” The following photos show one of my favorite vernal pools at the park, as it appeared on 04 November 2014. This vernal pool is located in a small meadow in the forest — it isn’t very big and it’s not very deep, but it has proven to be a location favored by many uncommon odonates.

Vernal pool at Huntley Meadows Park

Vernal pool at Huntley Meadows Park

Vernal pool at Huntley Meadows Park

Related Resources:

Tech Tips: I used my Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150 superzoom camera to shoot the three preceding photos. The camera was set for manual focus and aperture priority; the lens was focused at the hyperfocal distance for an aperture of f/4, based upon the instructions provided in the excellent video tutorial by Graham Houghton, “Panasonic Lumix FZ camera easier manual focus method — super point-and-shoot tip.” Focusing at the hyperfocal distance is a technique used in landscape photography that maximizes depth-of-field. For example, when my camera is set for maximum wide angle at an aperture of f/4, everything is in focus from approximately three feet to infinity — that’s DEEP depth-of-field!

Look closely at the upper part of the full-size version of all three photos. The purple fringing that appears along the edges of some tree limbs is called chromatic aberration; color fringing occurs sometimes in photographs of high contrast subjects such as the dark tree limbs against a bright sky. Adobe Lightroom 5 features several photo editing tools that work well for removing chromatic aberration. If the images featured in this post were fine-art landscape photos, then I would edit the images to remove the chromatic aberration. In this case, the photos are intended to show what a vernal pool looks like, and they are good enough for that purpose, warts and all.

Copyright © 2014 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

HDR composite image of Hollin Hall

January 14, 2013

The following semi-photorealistic HDR image of Hollin Hall is a composite of three bracketed exposures, +/- 2 stops of exposure: Photo 2 (0 ev); Photo 3 (-2 ev); Photo 4 (+2 ev).

Hh-side2_32-bit_hdr_ver2

Photo 1. HDR composite image.

P1150666

Photo 2. 0 ev.

P1150667

Photo 3. -2 ev.

P1150668

Photo 4. +2 ev.

Tech Tips: I used my Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150 superzoom camera to shoot three bracketed exposures of the same landscape. The camera was set for manual focus at the hyperfocal distance for an aperture of f/4, based upon the instructions provided in the excellent video tutorial by Graham Houghton, “Panasonic Lumix FZ camera easier manual focus method — super point-and-shoot tip.” I used Adobe Photoshop CS5 and Lightroom 4 to create and edit a 32-bit HDR composite image of the three exposures: Photoshop was used to create the HDR image; Lightroom 4 was used to adjust the composite image.

Copyright © 2013 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com


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