Posts Tagged ‘Lightroom’

Dragonflies in Flight

February 20, 2013

Dragonflies in Flight” is a slideshow featuring 68 still photographs by Walter Sanford. (Hey, that’s me!) The soundtrack is the song “Fly Away” by Lenny Kravitz (3:41 min).

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Tech Tips: The still photographs were adjusted using Apple Aperture and exported as 16-bit TIFFs. The TIFFs were imported into Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 4 as a collection. The “Slideshow” module in Lightroom was used to create and export the slideshow (56 MB). Watch Adobe TV and learn how to use Lightroom 4 to create a slideshow with music: “Publish a Slideshow,” by Julieanne Kost. See also, Stop-action photography of dragonflies in¬†flight.

Copyright © 2013 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

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HDR composite image redux

December 22, 2012

I used Adobe Lightroom 4 and Photoshop CS5 to create a 16-bit HDR composite image from three exposures of the George Washington Masonic Memorial, Alexandria, Virginia USA.

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Tech Tips: I used “More Saturated,” one of the Photoshop “Local Adaption” presets; no other adjustments were changed. I saved the resulting composite image to Lightroom, where I cropped the image, adjusted “Clarity” and added a vignette. Finally, I used the “Spot Removal” tool to remove several dust spots on the camera image sensor.

Copyright © 2012 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

George Washington Masonic Memorial

December 20, 2012

I used Adobe Lightroom 4 and Photoshop CS5 to create a photorealistic 32-bit pseudo-HDR composite image from three exposures of the George Washington Masonic Memorial, Alexandria, Virginia USA. I used Lightroom to make all of the adjustments to the composite image.

The iconic compass and square are symbolic Freemasonry tools; “G” stands for God and geometry.

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Tech Tips: I applied “Direct Positive,” one of the “Lightroom Color Presets,” cropped the image, adjusted “Clarity” and added a vignette. Finally, I used the “Spot Removal” tool to remove several dust spots on the camera image sensor.

Copyright © 2012 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Ruby-throated Hummingbird: Noise reduction using Aperture 3 versus Lightroom 4

December 14, 2012

The following photo of a Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) was post-processed using Apple Aperture 3, including adjustments for noise reduction and sharpening.

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The same photo was post-processed using Adobe Lightroom 4, including adjustments for noise reduction and sharpening.

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Although neither photo is high quality, the noise reduction adjustment in Lightroom is clearly superior to Aperture.

Copyright © 2012 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Ruby-throated Hummingbird: Noise reduction using Lightroom 4

December 12, 2012

I used my Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS150 superzoom camera to shoot the following photo of a Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) at the Visitor Center, Huntley Meadows Park.

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Tech Tips: The following camera settings were used for the preceding photo (above): Shutter Priority mode; ISO 800; focal length 108mm/600mm (35mm equivalent); 0 exposure value (ev); aperture f/5.2; shutter speed 1/1,250 sec. The camera automatically increased the ISO to 800 in order to compensate for less light reaching the camera sensor at a faster shutter speed. The resulting photo appears underexposed and is noticeably “noisy” (see Photo 2 of 2). I used Adobe Lightroom 4 to adjust the original photo, including noise reduction and sharpening (see Photo 1).

Copyright © 2012 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

HDR composite image

November 28, 2012

The following photo shows the results of an experiment in which I used Adobe Lightroom 4 and Photoshop CS5 to create a 16-bit HDR composite image from three exposures of the George Washington Masonic Memorial, Alexandria, Virginia USA.

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Tech Tips: I used “More Saturated,” one of the Photoshop “Local Adaption” presets; no other adjustments were changed. I saved the resulting composite image to Lightroom, where I made lens corrections.

Copyright © 2012 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Pseudo-HDR composite image redux

November 26, 2012

I used Adobe Lightroom 4 to “redevelop” the photorealistic 32-bit pseudo-HDR composite image of the George Washington Masonic Memorial featured in my last post. In my opinion, the newer version looks much better than the older version.

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Tech Tips: I applied “Direct Positive,” one of the “Lightroom Color Presets”; no other adjustments were changed.

Copyright © 2012 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Pseudo-HDR composite image test results

November 24, 2012

The following photo shows the results of an experiment in which I used Adobe Lightroom 4 and Photoshop CS5 to create a photorealistic 32-bit pseudo-HDR composite image from three exposures of the George Washington Masonic Memorial, Alexandria, Virginia USA. I used Lightroom to make all of the adjustments to the composite image, including lens corrections. I’m not 100% satisfied with the results, but considering this is the first time I ever used Lightroom to edit a photo I say, “Not bad!”

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The following gallery shows the three original photos that were composited to create the HDR image (shown above): Photo 1 is exposed correctly (0 ev); Photo 2 is underexposed (-2 ev); Photo 3 is overexposed (+2 ev). I converted the original CR2 (raw) photo files to JPGs for online display; no adjustments were made to these photos.

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Tech Tips: How did I do it? See Lightroom Video: A New HDR Feature in Lightroom 4.1 for a five-minute video tutorial by Matt Kloskowski, Kelby Media Group. See also Tilt-Shift/perspective corrections in Lightroom 3, a three-minute YouTube video by “.”

Copyright © 2012 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com


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