Posts Tagged ‘mentum’

Boyeria vinosa exuvia

March 8, 2018

Bob Perkins collected and reared an unknown species of odonate nymph from a stream located in southwestern Virginia. The larva emerged from one of Bob’s holding tanks on 08 May 2017 and metamorphosed into an adult female Fawn Darner dragonfly (Boyeria vinosa). Fawn Darner is a member of the Family Aeshnidae (Darners).

A two-step process was used to verify the genus and species of the exuvia.

  1. Determine the family.
  2. Determine the genus and species.

Step 1. Family

First, determine the family of the specimen. For reference, watch the excellent Vimeo video Identifying dragonfly larva to family (8:06). Here’s the decision tree used to identify the exuvia as a member of the Family Aeshnidae (Darners).

  • The specimen has a flat labium that doesn’t cover the face (not mask-like), as shown in Photo No. 1, 3, and 4.
  • Antennae are thin and thread-like (not club-like, as in Gomphidae larvae), as shown in Photo No. 1-4.
  • Eyes are large relative to the size of the head, as shown in Photo No. 1.

No. 1 | Boyeria vinosa | exuvia (face-head)

Step 2. Genus and species

The dichotomous key for Boyeria larvae that appears on p. 22 in Identification Keys to Northeastern Anisoptera Larvae, compiled by Ken Soltesz, was used to verify the genus and species of the exuvia.

1. Length when grown 37-39 mm;
Lateral spines on abdominal segments 4 to 9 (minute on 4);
Mentum of labium more than twice as long as its median width;
Inferior caudal appendages (paraprocts) stouter, scarcely incurved at tips;
Apex of superior anal appendage (epiproct) uncleft and sharply pointed;
Epiproct as long as paraprocts. [grafiana]

1’. Length when grown 34-37 mm;
Lateral spines on abdominal segments 5 to 9;
Mentum of labium less than twice as long as its median width;
Inferior caudal appendages (paraprocts) more slender, distinctly incurved at tips;
Apex of superior anal appendage (epiproct) deeply emarginate (cleft);
Epiproct distinctly shorter than paraprocts. [vinosa]

The exuvia is ~35 mm (~3.5 cm) long. Lateral spines are present on abdominal segments five to nine (S5 to S9).

No. 2 | Boyeria vinosa | exuvia (dorsal)

The rudimentary ovipositor shown in Photo No. 3 indicates this individual is a female.

No. 3 | Boyeria vinosa | exuvia (ventral)

The prementum is less than twice as long as its median width, as shown in Photo No. 4.

No. 4 | Boyeria vinosa | exuvia (prementum)

The paraprocts are incurved at the tips.

No. 5 | Boyeria vinosa | exuvia (anal pyramid)

There is a cleft in the apex of the epiproct. The cleft is closed in the exuvia (above); it is open in the nymph (below). Both photos show the same specimen, before and after emergence.

Image used with permission from Bob Perkins.

Both the Soltesz dichotomous key and the key for Boyeria larvae that appears on pp. 88-89 in Dragonflies of North America, Third Edition by Needham et al. describe the epiproct as “distinctly shorter than paraprocts.” The epiproct and paraprocts are nearly the same length. In the opinion of the author, this marker is least useful for differentiating grafiana and vinosa nymphs/evuviae.

This specimen is confirmed as an exuvia from a Fawn Darner dragonfly (Boyeria vinosa).

Adult

The adult Fawn Darner dragonfly emerged on 08 May 2017. Fawn Darners are, on average, 60-71 mm long (Paulson, 2011).

Image used with permission from Bob Perkins.

This individual is a female, as indicated by its rounded hind wings (above) and prominent ovipositor (below).

Image used with permission from Bob Perkins.

Tech Tips

The following equipment was used to shoot Photo No. 2 and 3: Canon EOS 5D Mark II digital camera, in manual mode; Kenko 20mm macro automatic extension tubeCanon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro lens (set for manual focus); and Canon MT-26EX-RT Macro Twin LitePhoto No. 1, 4, and 5: Canon EOS 5D Mark II digital camera, in manual mode; Canon MP-E 65mm Macro lens (manual focus only, set for 2x – 3x magnification); and Canon MT-26EX-RT Macro Twin Lite.

Sunpak LED-160 Video Light (with a white translucent plastic filter) was used for all photos.

Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to annotate selected images.

Bob Perkins’ photos were shot using a Canon EOS Rebel T3i camera body and Canon EF-S 60mm macro lens. The photos of the adult were taken soon after emergence.

Related Resource

The dichotomous key for Boyeria larvae that appears on pp. 88-89 in Dragonflies of North America, Third Edition by Needham et al. is as follows.

1. Epiproct about as long as paraprocts, its apex acute, not emarginate; greatest width of prementum about 3/5 its length; paraprocts shorter than abdominal segments 9+10, each with apex nearly straight (Fig. 85). [grafiana]

1’. Epiproct distinctly shorter than paraprocts, its apex distinctly emarginate; greatest width of prementum about 2/3 its length; paraprocts longer than abdominal segments 9+10, each with apex distinctly incurved (Fig. 85). [vinosa]

Post Update

Thanks to Northeast Odonata Facebook group members Curt Oien and Nick Block for sharing the following helpful tips. Both Curt and Nick are also members of the Dragonfly Society of the Americas.

The face-head of an Aeshnidae nymph/exuvia is relatively easy to recognize. Would I have said that when I was a beginner? In a word, no. Watch the Vimeo video a few times and you’ll see what I’m saying.

So, after you determine a specimen is from the Family Aeshnidae, look for a prominent light-colored diamond shape on the dorsal side of abdominal segment eight (S8), as shown in Photo No. 2 and 5: if it’s there, then you can be fairly certain the genus is Boyeria.

Curt looks for the cleft in the epiproct to determine the species. I recommend looking at other markers that are easier to see.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Advertisements

Cordulegastridae exuvia

February 6, 2018

My good friend Mike Boatwright, a fellow Virginian and extraordinarily good odonate hunter, collected an exuvia on 22 June 2017 in Amherst County, Virginia USA. Mike sent the exuvia to me for identification. This specimen is a member of the Family Cordulegastridae (Spiketails).

Photo No. 1 enabled me to see all of the critical field markers required to make an identification to the family level for this specimen. Here’s the decision tree I used to identify the exuvia as a spiketail dragonfly, based upon the excellent Vimeo video, Identifying dragonfly larva to family (8:06).

  • The specimen has a mask-like labium.
  • The margins of the labium have “deeply jagged, irregular teeth.”

Of the four families of dragonflies that feature a mask-like labium, the crenulations on the face of Corduligastridae are unmistakeable!

No. 1 | Cordulegaster sp. | exuvia (face-head)

(See a full-size version of the original photo, without annotation.)

The specimen is ~3.5 cm long (~1.4 in) and ~8 mm wide (0.3 in) at its widest. Notice the dorsal side of the exuvia is covered by sandy grit. The specimen will need to be cleaned in order to get a clearer view of the frontal shelf.

No. 2 | Cordulegaster sp. | exuvia (dorsal)

(See a full-size version of the original photo, without annotation.)

Photo No. 3 shows a ventral view of the exuvia.

No. 3 | Cordulegaster sp. | exuvia (ventral)

(See a full-size version of the original photo, without annotation.)

Photo No. 4 shows a closer view of the “rudimentary ovipositor,” located on abdominal segment nine (S9). An ovipositor is used for egg-laying by all adult damselflies and some species of adult dragonflies: females have this feature; males do not. Therefore, this individual is a female spiketail.

No. 4 | Cordulegaster sp. | exuvia (ventral, rudimentary ovipositor)

(See a full-size version of the original photo, without annotation.)

Photo No. 5 shows a closer view of the mentum, a two-segment hinged “jaw” that is used to grab food: the prementum is the segment of the labium closer to the mouth; the postmentum is the segment closer to the base of the head. Only the prementum can be seen in the following photo.

No. 5 | Cordulegaster sp. | exuvia (ventral, prementum)

Determining the genus and species

Although it’s easy to identify Cordulegastridae exuvia to the family level, it’s more challenging to identify a specimen to the species level. First, the exuvia must be cleaned in order to show the small hairs and brown dots on the frontal shelf. Second, the labium must be pulled forward to show the inside of the face mask in order to count palpal- and premental setae.

Related Resources

Tech Tips

The following equipment was used to shoot all of the macro photographs featured in this post: Fujifilm X-T1 digital camera; Fujifilm MCEX-11 extension tube; and Fujinon XF80mm macro lens. An off-camera Fujifilm EF-X500 external flash unit and Sunpak LED-160 Video Light (with a white translucent plastic filter) was used for Photo No. 1-3 and 5. A Raynox DCR-250 close-up filter and Canon MT-26EX-RT Macro Twin Lite was used for Photo No. 4.

Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to annotate selected images.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Anax junius exuvia

January 14, 2017

A dragonfly exuvia from the Family Aeshnidae (Darners) was collected on 21 June 2016 at Hidden Pond, Meadowood Recreation Area, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This specimen is an exuvia from a Common Green Darner dragonfly (Anax junius).

A two-step process was used to identify the genus and species of the specimen.

  1. Determine the family.
  2. Determine the genus and species.

Step 1. Family

First, determine the family of the specimen. For reference, watch the excellent Vimeo video, Identifying dragonfly larva to family (8:06). Here’s the decision tree I used to identify the exuvia as a member of the Family Aeshnidae (Darners).

  • The specimen has a flat labium that doesn’t cover the face (not mask-like), as shown in Photo No. 1-4.
  • Antennae are thin and thread-like (not club-like, as in Gomphidae larvae), as shown in Photo No. 4.
  • Eyes are large relative to the size of the head, as shown in Photo No. 5.

Step 2. Genus and species

As shown in Photo No. 1, lateral spines along abdominal segments seven, eight, and nine (S7-9) indicate the genus is Anax.

A dragonfly exuvia from the Family Aeshnidae (Darners), collected at Hidden Pond, Meadowood Recreation Area, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is Anax junius.

No. 1 | Common Green Darner (Anax junius) | exuvia (dorsal-lateral)

(See a full-size version of the original photo, without annotation.)

At this point, you know the species could be either anax (Common Green Darner dragonfly) or longipes (Comet Darner dragonfly). The species is determined by the shape of the palpal lobes (see Photo No. 3) and the length of the specimen (see Photo No. 2).

A dragonfly exuvia from the Family Aeshnidae (Darners), collected at Hidden Pond, Meadowood Recreation Area, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is Anax junius.

No. 2 | Common Green Darner (Anax junius) | exuvia (lateral)

(See a full-size version of the original photo, without annotation.)

The labium, also known as the mentum, is a two-segment hinged “jaw” that is used to grab food: the prementum is the segment of the labium closer to the mouth; the postmentum is the segment closer to the base of the head.

The specimen is ~4.7 cm (~1.9 in) in length, not counting the bend in the body.

A dragonfly exuvia from the Family Aeshnidae (Darners), collected at Hidden Pond, Meadowood Recreation Area, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is Anax junius.

No. 3 | Common Green Darner (Anax junius) | exuvia (labium, ventral)

(See a full-size version of the original photo, without annotation.)

The rounded shape of the palpal lobes (see Photo No. 3, above) plus the length of the specimen (see Photo No. 2) indicate the species is juniusAnax junius is one of the more common species of Aeshnidae found in Northern Virginia.

A dragonfly exuvia from the Family Aeshnidae (Darners), collected at Hidden Pond, Meadowood Recreation Area, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is Anax junius.

No. 4 | Common Green Darner (Anax junius) | exuvia (face-head)

Notice the antennae are thin and thread-like, as shown in the preceding photo. If you are an aquatic animal, this is a face you don’t want to see up-close and personally!

A dragonfly exuvia from the Family Aeshnidae (Darners), collected at Hidden Pond, Meadowood Recreation Area, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is Anax junius.

No. 5 | Common Green Darner (Anax junius) | exuvia (head, dorsal)

The eyes are large relative to the size of the head.

Tech Tips:

The following equipment was used to shoot all of the preceding photographs: Canon EOS 5D Mark II digital camera, in manual mode; Canon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro lens (set for manual focus); Canon 580EX II external flash, off-camera, in manual mode; Canon 580EX external flash, off-camera, in manual mode; and a Yongnuo YN-622C-TX E-TTL II Wireless Flash Controller for Canon plus a two-pack of Yongnuo YN-622C II E-TTL Wireless Flash Transceivers for Canon. A Raynox DCR-250 close-up filter was used for Photo No. 3-5.

Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to annotate selected images.

The first test shot for this exuvia was photographed using my Canon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro lens plus a Kenko 20mm macro automatic extension tube. As you can see in the following photo, the subject barely fit within the frame. Although the composition isn’t ideal, the resulting photo is dramatic nonetheless! The 20mm extension tube wasn’t used for the rest of the photo set.

A dragonfly exuvia from the Family Aeshnidae (Darners), collected at Hidden Pond, Meadowood Recreation Area, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is Anax junius.

No. 6 | Common Green Darner (Anax junius) | exuvia (lateral)

The following photograph of the exuvia was taken in-situ along the shoreline of Hidden Pond using a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150 superzoom bridge camera and Canon 580EX Speedlite, my go-to kit for photowalking.

A dragonfly exuvia spotted at Hidden Pond, Meadowood Recreation Area, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is probably a member of Family Aeshnidae.

No. 7 | 21 JUN 2016 | MRA | Anax junius exuvia (in-situ)

Related Resources:

dichotomous key: a key for the identification of organisms based on a series of choices between alternative characters. Source Credit: Merriam-Webster Dictionary.

In long form, the decision tree is as follows (assuming the convention of labeling the two branches of each dichotomy as “a” and “b”, e.g. 1a, 1b, etc.):

p. 21, Key to the genera of the Family Aeshnidae
1b – Hind angles of head rounded … . (5)
5a – Lateral spines on abdominal segments 7 to 9 only. (6)
6b – Antenna about half as long as this distance [from the base of the antennae to the rear of head]. (Anax)

p. 22, Key to the species of the genus Anax
1a – Lateral lobes of labium tapering to a hooked point; total length about 40 mm. (junius) [Note: The total length of longipes is about 55 mm.]

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


%d bloggers like this: