Posts Tagged ‘Narrow-winged Damselflies’

Aurora Damsel (mating pair, in heart)

June 14, 2019

The mating pair of Aurora Damsel (Chromagrion conditum) shown in the following photograph is “in wheel,” in which the male uses “claspers” (terminal appendages) at the end of his abdomen to hold the female by her neck/thorax while they are joined at their abdomens. The male — blue, yellow, and black in color — is on top; the female — yellow and black in color — is on the bottom.

The copulatory, or wheel, position is unique to the Odonata, as is the distant separation of the male’s genital opening and copulatory organs. Source Credit: Paulson, Dennis (2011-12-19). Dragonflies and Damselflies of the East (Princeton Field Guides) (Kindle Locations 377-378). Princeton University Press. Kindle Edition.

The wheel position is sometimes referred to as “in heart” when damselflies mate.

04 JUN 2019 | PNC. William County, VA | Aurora Damsel (mating pair)

Female C. conditum is polymorphic, including two morphs: an andromorph with blue coloration similar to male; or a heteromorph with an entirely yellow thorax, as shown above.

It’s helpful to take photos of mating pairs of damselflies, especially “in wheel,” since males and females of the same species can look quite different.

Taxonomy

C. conditum is a monotypic genus in the Family Coenagrionidae (Narrow-winged Damselflies).

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

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Aurora Damsel (male, mating pair)

May 31, 2019

An Aurora Damsel (Chromagrion conditum) was spotted along the shoreline of a small pond located in Prince William County, Virginia USA. Aurora Damsel is a new species for my life list odonates.

This individual is a male, as indicated by his coloration and terminal appendages. Speaking of coloration, notice the underside of the male’s thorax is yellow — a key field mark for Aurora.

21 MAY 2019 | PNC. William County, VA | Aurora Damsel (male)

A mating pair of Aurora Damsel was spotted at the same location. This pair is “in tandem“: the male is on the upper-right; the female on the lower-left.

After copulation, Aurora Damsel engages in a form of guarding behavior known as “contact guarding,” in which the male and female fly “in tandem” to egg-laying sites. Contact guarding is used by most species of damselflies and some species of dragonflies to prevent aggressive males from hijacking the female.

21 MAY 2019 | PNC. William County, VA | Aurora Damsel (mating pair)

Female C. conditum is polymorphic, including two morphs: blue coloration similar to male; or with an entirely yellow thorax, as shown above.

It’s helpful to take photos of mating pairs of damselflies, especially “in tandem,” since males and females of the same species can look quite different. The preceding photo is slightly overexposed. As a result, the yellow coloration on both the male and female looks a little washed out.

Credits

Sincere thanks to Gary Myers for the tip that enabled Mike Powell and me to find this uncommon damselfly. See Aurora Damsels in action for Mike’s take on our first time seeing this species.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Powdered Dancer damselflies (males)

April 3, 2019

Two Powdered Dancer damselflies (Argia moesta) were spotted along Popes Head Creek near the town of Clifton, Virginia in Fairfax County USA. The stream is accessible via Chapel Road Park.

22 AUG 2016 | Chapel Road Park | Powdered Dancer (male)

Both individuals are male.

22 AUG 2016 | Chapel Road Park | Powdered Dancer (male)

Credits

Sincere thanks to Michael Boatwright, founder and administrator of the Virginia Odonata Facebook group, for help in verifying my tentative identification of the gender of these specimens. (I wanted to be sure neither individual is a blue morph female.)

Related Resource: Powdered Dancer damselfly (female). [tan morph]

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Powdered Dancer damselfly (female)

March 29, 2019

A Powdered Dancer damselfly (Argia moesta) was spotted during a photowalk along a small stream at Hemlock Overlook Regional Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

This individual is a female, as indicated by her coloration. Female Powdered Dancers are polymorphic: this is the tan morph; there is also a blue morph that looks somewhat similar to males of the same species.

10 MAY 2017 | HORP | Powdered Dancer (female)

Also notice the female’s abdomen is thicker near the tip than the tip of a male’s abdomen, due to female egg-laying anatomy.

Credits

Sincere thanks to Michael Boatwright, founder and administrator of the Virginia Odonata Facebook group, for help in identifying this specimen. My tentative identification, recorded in field notes dated 10 May 2017, proved to be incorrect.

I’m comfortable identifying some members of two of the three families of damselflies that occur in the mid-Atlantic states (USA), including Family Calopterygidae (Broad-winged Damselflies) and Family Lestidae (Spreadwings). Most members of the Family Coenagrionidae (Narrow-winged Damselflies), not so much.

I remember clearly the time when I was learning to identify dragonflies. I was more than a little confused at first. With persistence, the puzzle pieces started to fall into place sooner than I expected. Same story when I started learning to identify odonate exuviae. Never happened with damselflies, for whatever reason.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Familiar Bluet damselfly (male)

March 27, 2019

A Familiar Bluet damselfly (Enallagma civile) was spotted during a photowalk at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA.

This individual is a male, as indicated by the pattern of coloration on his abdomen. Female E. civile is polymorphic, including two morphs: tan; and blue. Female blue morphs have a different pattern of black and blue markings on their abdomen than males of the same species.

21 SEP 2016 | Occoquan Bay NWR | Familiar Bluet (male)

Related Resource: Familiar Bluet damselfly (female).

Credits

Sincere thanks to Mike Boatwright and Michael Moore for verifying my tentative identification of the damselfly. Mike Boatwright is the founder and administrator of the Virginia Odonata Facebook group; Dr. Michael Moore is a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at University of Delaware and odonate expert extraordinaire. Michael’s new Web site is a treasure trove of helpful resources.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Blue-fronted Dancers (male, female)

March 22, 2019

Male

A Blue-fronted Dancer damselfly (Argia apicalis) was spotted near Mulligan Pond at Jackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

This individual is a male, as indicated by the pattern of blue coloration on his thorax and abdomen, plus the blue coloration on abdominal segments eight through 10 (S8-10).

25 SEP 2016 | Jackson Miles Abbott WR | Blue-fronted Dancer (male)

Female

Several Blue-fronted Dancers were spotted during a photowalk along Accotink Creek/Great Blue Heron Trail at Accotink Bay Wildlife Refuge (ABWR), Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

The first individual is a female, as indicated by two field marks.

Eyes brown, darker above; lack of blue in eyes in andromorph good distinction from male. Source Credit: Paulson, Dennis (2011-12-19). Dragonflies and Damselflies of the East (Princeton Field Guides) (Kindle Locations 3451-3452). Princeton University Press. Kindle Edition.

Female Blue-fronted Dancers are polymorphicandromorph females are blue like males; heteromorph females are brown-green. Andromorph females tend to be a lighter shade of blue than males of the same species.

This individual is a blue andromorph. Regardless of the color morph…

females never have blue on the last abdominal segments (S8-10). Source Credit: Michael Boatwright, founder and administrator of the Virginia Odonata Facebook group.

02 AUG 2016 | ABWR | Blue-fronted Dancer (female)

More males

Two male Blue-fronted Dancers were spotted at Accotink Bay Wildlife Refuge.

02 AUG 2016 | ABWR | Blue-fronted Dancer (male)

02 AUG 2016 | ABWR | Blue-fronted Dancer (male)

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Blue-fronted Dancer damselflies (male, females)

August 7, 2018

Several Blue-fronted Dancer damselflies (Argia apicalis) were photographed along an unnamed small creek in Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

Male

The first individual is a male, as indicated by the pattern of coloration on his thorax and abdomen.

06 AUG 2018 | Fairfax County, VA | Blue-fronted Dancer (male)

Female

Female A. apicalis is polymorphic, including two morphs: tan; and blue.

06 AUG 2018 | Fairfax County, VA | Blue-fronted Dancer (female, tan)

Blue females can be differentiated from blue males by looking for the reproductive anatomy located on the underside of the posterior end of their abdomen.

06 AUG 2018 | Fairfax County, VA | Blue-fronted Dancer (female, blue)

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Stream Bluet damselflies (mating pair, in tandem)

August 5, 2018

A mating pair of Stream Bluet damselflies (Enallagma exsulans) was spotted during a stream-walk along South Fork Quantico Creek in Prince William Forest Park (PWFP), Prince William County, Virginia USA. This pair is in tandem.

After copulation, Stream Bluet engages in a form of guarding behavior known as “contact guarding,” in which the male and female fly “in tandem” to egg-laying sites. Contact guarding is used by some species of odonates to prevent aggressive males from hijacking the female.

26 JUN 2018 | PWFP | Stream Bluet (mating pair, in tandem)

Female E. exsulans is polymorphic, including two morphs: green or blue thorax; abdomen similar to male for both morphs. The female shown in the preceding photo is a green morph.

Look closely at the posterior end of the female’s abdomen. All female damselflies (and some species of dragonflies) use an ovipositor to insert fertilized eggs into vegetation (endophytic oviposition). Notice the white spheroid at the tip of her ovipositor. That’s either a single egg or egg cluster/mass, probably the former.

Now look at the male. He appears to be “recharging” for mating again: Sperm is transferred from the genital opening under abdominal segment nine (S9) to the secondary genitalia located under abdominal segment two (S2). Remember all dragonflies and damselflies have a 10-segmented abdomen.

Editor’s Notes

Thanks to my good friend Mike Boatwright, administrator of the Virginia Odonata Facebook group, for verifying my tentative identification of the species of damselfly. Also thanks to Sue Gregoire, Kestrel Haven Migration Observatory, for sharing her expert opinion that my photo shows a single egg at the tip of the female’s ovipositor.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

You look Familiar

August 3, 2018

A Familiar Bluet damselfly (Enallagma civile) was spotted during a photowalk along one of many trails at Occoquan Regional Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

08 JUN 2018 | Occoquan Regional Park | Familiar Bluet (male)

This individual is a male, as indicated by the pattern of coloration on his abdomen. Female E. civile is polymorphic, including two morphs: tan; and blue. Female blue morphs have a different pattern of black and blue markings on their abdomen than males of the same species.

Editor’s Note

Sincere thanks to my good friend Mike Boatwright, administrator of the Virginia Odonata Facebook group, for verifying my tentative identification.

Related Resource: Familiar Bluet damselfly (female).

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Damnselflies

July 22, 2018

Did you notice what I did there? It’s not that I don’t like damselflies. I do. They don’t like me. I’m comfortable identifying some members of two of the three families of damselflies that occur in the mid-Atlantic states (USA), including Family Calopterygidae (Broad-winged Damselflies) and Family Lestidae (Spreadwings). Most members of the Family Coenagrionidae (Narrow-winged Damselflies), not so much.

I remember clearly the time when I was learning to identify dragonflies. I was more than a little confused at first. With persistence, the puzzle pieces started to fall into place sooner than I expected. Same story when I started learning to identify odonate exuviae. Never happened with damselflies, for whatever reason.

For example, here’s a photograph of a damselfly that I photographed recently at an unnamed small creek in Fairfax County, Virginia USA. I made a tentative identification after I edited the photo — I misidentified both the species and gender as an immature male Powdered Dancer damselfly (Argia moesta).

19 JUL 2018 | Fairfax County, VA | Blue-fronted Dancer (female)

As it turns out, this individual is a female Blue-fronted Dancer damselfly (Argia apicalis). Sincere thanks to my good friend Mike Boatwright, administrator of the Virginia Odonata Facebook group, for correcting my misidentification!

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

 


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