Posts Tagged ‘Northern Rough Greensnake’

Year in review: New finds in 2014 (non-odonates)

November 22, 2014

I’m an equal opportunity photographer. Although I tend to focus on photographing odonates (dragonflies and damselflies) I will photograph anything interesting that catches my eye. This retrospective features non-odonate new finds for 2014.

Palm Warbler (Setophaga palmarum)

Palm Warbler (Setophaga palmarum)

21 April 2014 | Huntley Meadows Park

Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas) warbler

Common Yellowthroat (male)

21 April 2014 | Huntley Meadows Park

Bee-like Robber Fly (Laphria macquarti)

Robber Fly (Laphria macquarti)

22 July 2014 | Huntley Meadows Park

Handsome Meadow Katydids, mating pair (Orchelimum pulchellum)

Handsome Meadow Katydids (mating pair)

10 September 2014 | Huntley Meadows Park

Clip-wing Grasshoppers, mating pair (Metaleptea brevicornis)

Clip-wing Grasshoppers (mating pair)

19 September 2014 | Huntley Meadows Park

Northern Rough Greensnake (Opheodrys aestivus)

Northern Rough Greensnake (Opheodrys aestivus)

19 September 2014 | Huntley Meadows Park

Related Resources:

Editor’s Note: This is Part 3 in a three-part series — a retrospective look at 2014.

Copyright © 2014 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Northern Rough Greensnake

September 21, 2014

The Northern Rough Greensnake (Opheodrys aestivus), shown below, was one of my “great white whales.” That is, until my luck changed recently. Eureka!

It is usually found in areas of thick, green vegetation. Small trees, bushes, briar patches, and tangles of vines are favorite areas. … This is the only arboreal snake in Virginia. … This species eats mainly grasshoppers, crickets, caterpillars, spiders, small frogs, and snails or slugs. Source Credit: Northern Rough Greensnake (Opheodrys aestivus aestivus), Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries.

Northern Rough Greensnake (Opheodrys aestivus)

The greensnake was spotted during a photowalk along the boardwalk in the central wetland area at Huntley Meadows Park on 19 September 2014. I estimate this individual is approximately three feet (3′) in length.

Northern Rough Greensnake (Opheodrys aestivus)

Some snakes tend to freeze and remain motionless when confronted by danger. As soon as the snake saw me, it froze in place just long enough for me to take a few photos. The greensnake slithered into dense vegetation alongside the boardwalk and disappeared quickly after a couple of hikers walked around the snake.

Copyright © 2014 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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