Posts Tagged ‘Photoshop’

HDR composite image redux

December 22, 2012

I used Adobe Lightroom 4 and Photoshop CS5 to create a 16-bit HDR composite image from three exposures of the George Washington Masonic Memorial, Alexandria, Virginia USA.

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Tech Tips: I used “More Saturated,” one of the Photoshop “Local Adaption” presets; no other adjustments were changed. I saved the resulting composite image to Lightroom, where I cropped the image, adjusted “Clarity” and added a vignette. Finally, I used the “Spot Removal” tool to remove several dust spots on the camera image sensor.

Copyright © 2012 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

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George Washington Masonic Memorial

December 20, 2012

I used Adobe Lightroom 4 and Photoshop CS5 to create a photorealistic 32-bit pseudo-HDR composite image from three exposures of the George Washington Masonic Memorial, Alexandria, Virginia USA. I used Lightroom to make all of the adjustments to the composite image.

The iconic compass and square are symbolic Freemasonry tools; “G” stands for God and geometry.

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Tech Tips: I applied “Direct Positive,” one of the “Lightroom Color Presets,” cropped the image, adjusted “Clarity” and added a vignette. Finally, I used the “Spot Removal” tool to remove several dust spots on the camera image sensor.

Copyright © 2012 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

HDR composite image

November 28, 2012

The following photo shows the results of an experiment in which I used Adobe Lightroom 4 and Photoshop CS5 to create a 16-bit HDR composite image from three exposures of the George Washington Masonic Memorial, Alexandria, Virginia USA.

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Tech Tips: I used “More Saturated,” one of the Photoshop “Local Adaption” presets; no other adjustments were changed. I saved the resulting composite image to Lightroom, where I made lens corrections.

Copyright © 2012 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Pseudo-HDR composite image test results

November 24, 2012

The following photo shows the results of an experiment in which I used Adobe Lightroom 4 and Photoshop CS5 to create a photorealistic 32-bit pseudo-HDR composite image from three exposures of the George Washington Masonic Memorial, Alexandria, Virginia USA. I used Lightroom to make all of the adjustments to the composite image, including lens corrections. I’m not 100% satisfied with the results, but considering this is the first time I ever used Lightroom to edit a photo I say, “Not bad!”

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The following gallery shows the three original photos that were composited to create the HDR image (shown above): Photo 1 is exposed correctly (0 ev); Photo 2 is underexposed (-2 ev); Photo 3 is overexposed (+2 ev). I converted the original CR2 (raw) photo files to JPGs for online display; no adjustments were made to these photos.

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Tech Tips: How did I do it? See Lightroom Video: A New HDR Feature in Lightroom 4.1 for a five-minute video tutorial by Matt Kloskowski, Kelby Media Group. See also Tilt-Shift/perspective corrections in Lightroom 3, a three-minute YouTube video by “.”

Copyright © 2012 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Diptics: Feathered friends of Huntley Meadows Park

January 27, 2012

The following gallery of four-panel diptychs features several photos of birds spotted during a photowalk through Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. Shown clockwise from the upper-left panel: Red-bellied Woodpecker (adult male); Great Blue Heron; Ring-billed Gull; and Mallard (female).

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Tech Tips: The preceding composite images were created using Apple “Aperture,” Adobe “Photoshop,” and “Diptic” app for Apple iOS mobile devices. For details, see “Advanced technique for creating Diptic ‘photo tiles’” (one of my recent Posterous posts). The border is five (5) pixels wide, rather than my usual preference of 10 pixels.

Copyright © 2012 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Diptics: Henry Moore Sundial Sculpture

January 23, 2012

The following gallery of four-panel diptychs features several photos of the Henry Moore Sundial Sculpture, Sundial Plaza, Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum, Chicago, Illinois USA. The sculpture is a type of sundial that is sometimes referred to as a “bowstring” equatorial sundial. See also an annotated photo of the sculpture that illustrates how a “bowstring” equatorial sundial is simply a reduced model of the Earth.

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Tech Tips: The preceding composite images were created using Apple “Aperture,” Adobe “Photoshop,” and “Diptic” app for Apple iOS mobile devices. For details, see “Advanced technique for creating Diptic ‘photo tiles’” (one of my recent Posterous posts). The border is five (5) pixels wide, rather than my usual preference of 10 pixels.

Copyright © 2012 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Diptics: University of Colorado Boulder

January 21, 2012

For more than a decade, I was actively involved with several K-13 education outreach initiatives of the American Meteorological Society. I was fortunate to be able to visit Boulder, Colorado USA for several in-service training workshops for science teachers. We stayed at Kittredge Complex, University of Colorado, for every workshop.

The following gallery of three-panel diptychs features several photos of the University of Colorado Boulder campus. Shown clockwise from the top: Kittredge Complex, with a spectacular view of the Flatirons in the background (part of the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains); the John Garrey Tippit Memorial Sundial, an equatorial sundial; and the Colorado Scale Model Solar System (notice my reflection and the Fiske Planetarium and Science Center behind me).

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Tech Tips: The preceding composite images were created using Apple “Aperture,” Adobe “Photoshop,” and “Diptic” app for Apple iOS mobile devices. For details, see “Advanced technique for creating Diptic ‘photo tiles’” (one of my recent Posterous posts). The border of Photos 1 and 3 is five (5) pixels; 10 pixels for Photos 2 and 4.

Copyright © 2012 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Diptics: "Bowstring" equatorial sundials

January 19, 2012

The following gallery of four-panel diptychs features photos of two “bowstring” equatorial sundial sculptures: 1) the Robert Adzema Hyatt Regency Jersey City Sundial, Jersey City, New Jersey USA, a combination “bowstring” equatorial sundial, noon mark solar calendar, and horizontal sundial (shown in the two upper panels); and 2) the Henry Moore Sundial Sculpture, Sundial Plaza, Adler Planetarium & Astronomy Museum, Chicago, Illinois USA (shown in the two lower panels).

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Tech Tips: The preceding composite images were created using Apple “Aperture,” Adobe “Photoshop,” and “Diptic” app for Apple iOS mobile devices. For details, see “Advanced technique for creating Diptic ‘photo tiles’” (one of my recent Posterous posts). The border is five (5) pixels wide, rather than my usual preference of 10 pixels.

Photos © Copyright 2012 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Advanced technique for creating Diptic "photo tiles"

December 27, 2011

I like to use Apple Aperture to prepare ready-made “photo tiles” that are the perfect size to add to the panels in a Diptic layout. That said, some photos can’t be cropped to a size of say 1024 x 1024 pixels square without losing critical parts of the photo. Here’s a solution that is both simple and elegant — it’s called “round-tripping.”

I set Aperture’s “Export” preferences to hand-off a copy of an image file to an extrnal photo editor. I’m using Adobe Photoshop, but a much less expensive application such as ImageWell works too. I selected an image in my Aperture Library (see Photo 1 of 3, below), chose the Crop tool and “Square” Aspect Ratio, and selected an area that is 1723 x 1723 pixels square (see Photo 2 of 3, below). From the Aperture menu bar, I selected Photos > Edit with Adobe Photoshop…; Photoshop opened and I changed the image size to 1024 x 1024 pixels square. From the Photoshop menu bar, I selected File > Save; voila, the re-sized image appeared in my Aperture Library (round-trip completed)! Finally, I exported the re-sized photo from Aperture as usual (see Photo 3 of 3, below). Now the photo tile is ready for use in a Diptic diptych. Simple, huh? Really, it’s simpler than it sounds and best of all, there’s none of the loss in image quality that would occur by opening/editing/saving a photo in two-or-more applications. Now that’s cool!

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Tech Tips: When cropping a selected area from a photo that will be re-sized, be sure the dimensions of the selected area are larger than the intended dimensions of the re-sized version. Otherwise you may see “jaggies” in the final image.

Photos © Copyright 2011 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Fossil sea snail shell

October 10, 2011

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Fossil marine gastropod mollusk shell (Ecphora quadricostata) collected at the Texasgulf Aurora Phosphate Mine, Aurora, North Carolina USA. The word “costa” means “rib,” derived from the Latin word “costae.” Notice that the shell of Ecphora quadricostata has four costae (ribs). Photo 1 of 3 was annotated to highlight the four costae; Photo 2 of 3 is the original photograph.

Habitat: A relatively “shallow” sea that existed along the east coast of the United States an estimated 10- to 15 million years ago, during the Miocene Epoch.

The Aurora Phosphate Mine, formerly owned by Texasgulf Inc., is currently owned and operated by Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan (PotashCorp).

Editor’s Note: Are you a keen observer with eagle eyes? Did you notice I used “North Carolina” quarters to show the relative size of a fossil from North Carolina? That’s a subtle detail you may have overlooked.

Tech Tips: I just added another photo to this post. AshleyBradford, professional graphic artist and fellow Project Noah citizen scientist, used Adobe “Photoshop” to adjust the original photo after I asked about “white balance.” With a little post-processing by a pro, Ashley’s version (Photo 3) looks than much better mine (Photos 1-2). Thanks for your kind assistance, AB!


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