Posts Tagged ‘Popes Head Creek’

Heaven on Earth?

October 19, 2017

Did I find Heaven on Earth? All signs point to yes!

17 OCT 2017 | Webb Nature Sanctuary | NOVA Parks

17 OCT 2017 | Webb Nature Sanctuary | NOVA Parks

Well, maybe. Time will tell. All I know now is I didn’t see any dragonflies anywhere along the trails at Webb Nature Sanctuary, Clifton, Virginia USA on 17 October 2017, my first visit to the park.

As odonate hunting season is winding down I’m transitioning into “exploration mode,” when I check out new places while the weather is still relatively mild.

Getting oriented

The following map is located at the trail head.

17 OCT 2017 | Webb Nature Sanctuary | NOVA Parks

Margaret’s Branch, located along Fern Valley Trail, is a small stream that might provide good habitat for lotic species of dragonflies such as clubtails and spiketails.

Popes Head Creek is known to provide good habitat for many species of odonates, including Fawn Darner dragonfly and Dusky Dancer damselfly, to name a couple of fall species.

17 OCT 2017 | Webb Nature Sanctuary | NOVA Parks

R. Randolph Buckley Park (also known as Eight-Acre Park) is located on the opposite side of Popes Head Creek from Webb Nature Sanctuary. Buckley Park can be accessed via a footbridge across Popes Head Creek.

Related Resource: Lentic and lotic, a blog post by Walter Sanford.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

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Lentic and lotic

October 3, 2017

Doesn’t this idyllic place look like ideal habitat for lotic species of odonates? It is!

Lotic refers to flowing water, from the Latin lotus, washed. … Lotic ecosystems can be contrasted with lentic ecosystems, which involve relatively still terrestrial waters such as lakes and ponds. Source Credit: River ecosystem, Wikipedia.

The preceding photo shows the stream crossing at Popes Head Creek, Hemlock Overlook Regional Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA (facing downstream toward Bull Run). Both streams provide ideal habitat for many species of dragonflies and damselflies that prefer flowing water rather than still water.

Tech Tip: I used my Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS150 superzoom camera to shoot the landscape photo featured in this blog post. The camera was set for manual focus at the hyperfocal distance for an aperture of f/4, based upon the instructions provided in the excellent video tutorial by Graham Houghton, “Panasonic Lumix FZ camera easier manual focus method — super point-and-shoot tip.”

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Northern Watersnake

June 13, 2017

A Northern Watersnake (Nerodia sipedon sipedon) was spotted during a photowalk along Pope’s Head Creek at Hemlock Overlook Regional Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

03 MAY 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Northern Watersnake

Look closely at the full-size version of the following photo. Did you notice the fresh blood on the underside of its body? Also notice the scar on the dorsal side of the snake’s body. The former is probably blood from prey; the latter is probably the result of an attack by another predator.

03 MAY 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Northern Watersnake

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Bridges

January 20, 2017

As an avid odonate hunter, I photowalk/streamwalk many scenic locations. I’m fond of bridges, especially railroad bridges.

The first photo shows a view of the underside of the new suspension bridge across Accotink Creek at Accotink Bay Wildlife Refuge (ABWR), Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

A scenic view of the underside of the suspension bridge that crosses Accotink Creek at Accotink Bay Wildlife Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

07 AUG 2016 | ABWR | new suspension bridge across Accotink Creek

The next photo shows the view looking upstream toward the ruins of a Civil War era railroad bridge that used to cross Pope’s Head Creek at Chapel Road Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

Looking upstream toward the ruins of a Civil War era railroad bridge that used to cross Pope's Head Creek, Chapel Road Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

22 AUG2016 | Chapel Road Park | bridge ruins at Pope’s Head Creek

The last photo shows the view looking downstream toward a modern era railroad bridge across Pope’s Head Creek near Chapel Road Park.

Looking downstream toward modern era railroad bridge that crosses Pope's Head Creek, Chapel Road Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

29 AUG 2016 | Chapel Road Park | railroad bridge at Pope’s Head Creek

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Dusky Dancer damselflies (mating pair)

September 12, 2016

A mating pair of Dusky Dancer damselflies (Argia translata) was spotted along Pope’s Head Creek at Chapel Road Park. Dusky Dancer is a new species on my life list of odonates.

This pair is “in tandem“: the male is on the upper-right; the female is on the lower-left.

A mating pair of Dusky Dancer damselflies (Argia translata) spotted along Pope's Head Creek at Chapel Road Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is "in tandem."

29 AUG 2016 | Chapel Road Park | Dusky Dancer (mating pair)

The male is on the upper-left in the following photo; the female is on the lower-right. The male is engaged in “contact guarding,” in which the male and female fly “in tandem” to egg-laying sites. The female is ovipositing in a partially submerged leaf.

A mating pair of Dusky Dancer damselflies (Argia translata) spotted along Pope's Head Creek at Chapel Road Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is "in tandem."

29 AUG 2016 | Chapel Road Park | Dusky Dancer (mating pair)

Related Resource: A. translata male (Dusky Dancer) [JPG] [digital scan].

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Powdered Dancer damselflies (mating pairs)

September 10, 2016

Two mating pairs of Powdered Dancer damselflies (Argia moesta) were spotted during a photowalk along Pope’s Head Creek at Chapel Road Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

The first mating pair is “in heart“: the male is on top; the female is on the bottom.

A mating pair of Powdered Dancer damselflies (Argia moesta) spotted along Pope's Head Creek at Chapel Road Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is "in heart."

29 AUG 2016 | Chapel Road Park | Powdered Dancer (mating pair)

Female Powdered Dancers are polymorphic; the female in the preceding mating pair is the blue morph that looks somewhat similar to males of the same species.

The last mating pair of Powdered Dancers was spotted “in tandem“: the male is on the upper-left; the female is on the lower-right. The female in the following mating pair is the tan morph.

A mating pair of Powdered Dancer damselflies (Argia moesta) spotted along Pope's Head Creek at Chapel Road Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is "in tandem."

29 AUG 2016 | Chapel Road Park | Powdered Dancer (mating pair)

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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