Posts Tagged ‘Powdered Dancer damslelfly’

Powdered Dancer damselflies (males)

April 3, 2019

Two Powdered Dancer damselflies (Argia moesta) were spotted along Popes Head Creek near the town of Clifton, Virginia in Fairfax County USA. The stream is accessible via Chapel Road Park.

22 AUG 2016 | Chapel Road Park | Powdered Dancer (male)

Both individuals are male.

22 AUG 2016 | Chapel Road Park | Powdered Dancer (male)

Credits

Sincere thanks to Michael Boatwright, founder and administrator of the Virginia Odonata Facebook group, for help in verifying my tentative identification of the gender of these specimens. (I wanted to be sure neither individual is a blue morph female.)

Related Resource: Powdered Dancer damselfly (female). [tan morph]

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

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Powdered Dancer damselfly (female)

March 29, 2019

A Powdered Dancer damselfly (Argia moesta) was spotted during a photowalk along a small stream at Hemlock Overlook Regional Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

This individual is a female, as indicated by her coloration. Female Powdered Dancers are polymorphic: this is the tan morph; there is also a blue morph that looks somewhat similar to males of the same species.

10 MAY 2017 | HORP | Powdered Dancer (female)

Also notice the female’s abdomen is thicker near the tip than the tip of a male’s abdomen, due to female egg-laying anatomy.

Credits

Sincere thanks to Michael Boatwright, founder and administrator of the Virginia Odonata Facebook group, for help in identifying this specimen. My tentative identification, recorded in field notes dated 10 May 2017, proved to be incorrect.

I’m comfortable identifying some members of two of the three families of damselflies that occur in the mid-Atlantic states (USA), including Family Calopterygidae (Broad-winged Damselflies) and Family Lestidae (Spreadwings). Most members of the Family Coenagrionidae (Narrow-winged Damselflies), not so much.

I remember clearly the time when I was learning to identify dragonflies. I was more than a little confused at first. With persistence, the puzzle pieces started to fall into place sooner than I expected. Same story when I started learning to identify odonate exuviae. Never happened with damselflies, for whatever reason.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Powdered Dancer (males, female)

August 20, 2017

A Powdered Dancer damselfly (Argia moesta) was spotted during a photowalk along a mid-size rocky stream in Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, as indicated by his terminal appendages. There is a whitish-blue morph female Powdered Dancer, therefore the male’s whitish-blue coloration is insufficient to identify its gender.

21 JUN 2017 | Fairfax County, VA | Powdered Dancer (male)

A week later, a mating pair of Powdered Dancers was spotted along the Potomac River at Riverbend Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is “in tandem“: the male is on the upper-left; the female on the lower-right.

28 JUN 2017 | Riverbend Park | Powdered Dancers (mating pair, in tandem)

The male is “contact guarding” the female as the pair flies “in tandem” to egg-laying sites where the female uses her ovipositor to insert eggs into vegetation (endophytic oviposition).

It’s helpful to take photos of mating pairs of damselflies, especially “in tandem,” since males and females of the same species can look quite different.

Female Powdered Dancers are polymorphic, including a whitish-blue andromorph and a brown heteromorph. The brown morph, shown in this pair, is more common than whitish-blue.

28 JUN 2017 | Riverbend Park | Powdered Dancers (mating pair, in tandem)

Did you notice the male Stream Bluet damselfly (Enallagma exsulans) perching near the Powdered Dancers? Thanks to Karen Kearney and Michael Boatwright, members of the Virginia Odonata Facebook group, for confirming my tentative identification of the Stream Bluet.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Powdered Dancer damselflies (mating pairs)

September 10, 2016

Two mating pairs of Powdered Dancer damselflies (Argia moesta) were spotted during a photowalk along Pope’s Head Creek at Chapel Road Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

The first mating pair is “in heart“: the male is on top; the female is on the bottom.

A mating pair of Powdered Dancer damselflies (Argia moesta) spotted along Pope's Head Creek at Chapel Road Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is "in heart."

29 AUG 2016 | Chapel Road Park | Powdered Dancer (mating pair)

Female Powdered Dancers are polymorphic; the female in the preceding mating pair is the blue morph that looks somewhat similar to males of the same species.

The last mating pair of Powdered Dancers was spotted “in tandem“: the male is on the upper-left; the female is on the lower-right. The female in the following mating pair is the tan morph.

A mating pair of Powdered Dancer damselflies (Argia moesta) spotted along Pope's Head Creek at Chapel Road Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is "in tandem."

29 AUG 2016 | Chapel Road Park | Powdered Dancer (mating pair)

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Powdered Dancer (males, female)

August 23, 2016

Several Powdered Dancer damselflies (Argia moesta) were spotted during two photowalks along the Potomac River at Riverbend Park. Powdered Dancer is a new species on my life list of odonates.

Male

This individual is a male, as indicated by its coloration. The common name “Powdered” seems to perfectly describe the appearance of males of this species.

A Powdered Dancer damselfly (Argia moesta) spotted along the Potomac River at Riverbend Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male.

04 AUG 2016 | Riverbend Park | Powdered Dancer (male)

Female

The following individual is a female, as indicated by its coloration. Female Powdered Dancers are polymorphic: this is the tan morph; there is also a blue morph that looks somewhat similar to males of the same species.

A Powdered Dancer damselfly (Argia moesta) spotted along the Potomac River at Riverbend Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female (light brown morph).

04 AUG 2016 | Riverbend Park | Powdered Dancer (female)

Also notice the female’s abdomen is thicker near the tip than the tip of the male’s abdomen, due to female egg-laying anatomy.

A Powdered Dancer damselfly (Argia moesta) spotted along the Potomac River at Riverbend Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female (light brown morph).

04 AUG 2016 | Riverbend Park | Powdered Dancer (female)

More males

Many more male Powdered Dancer damselflies were spotted during a follow-up photowalk on 08 August 2016.

A Powdered Dancer damselfly (Argia moesta) spotted along the Potomac River at Riverbend Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male.

08 AUG 2016 | Riverbend Park | Powdered Dancer (male)

A Powdered Dancer damselfly (Argia moesta) spotted along the Potomac River at Riverbend Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male.

08 AUG 2016 | Riverbend Park | Powdered Dancer (male)

A Powdered Dancer damselfly (Argia moesta) spotted along the Potomac River at Riverbend Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male.

08 AUG 2016 | Riverbend Park | Powdered Dancer (male)

Sidebar: Scientific Classification of Damselflies

The following concise explanation of the scientific classification of damselflies is provided to help the reader understand where the genus Argia (Dancers) fits into the bigger picture of the Order OdonataSuborder Zygoptera (Damselflies).

There are five families of damselflies in the United States of America, although only three families occur in the mid-Atlantic USA: Broad-winged damselflies; Narrow-winged damselflies (a.k.a., Pond Damselflies); and Spreadwing damselflies.

Family Calopterygidae is comprised of two genera.

Family Coenagrionidae is comprised of 14 genera. Three genera are common in Northern Virginia: Argia (Dancers); Enallagma (American Bluets); and Ischnura (Forktails).

Family Lestidae is comprised of two genera.

  • Archilestes (e.g., Great Spreadwing)
  • Lestes (e.g., Slender Spreadwing, Southern Spreadwing, Swamp Spreadwing)

There are relatively few genera of Broad-winged Damselflies and Spreadwing Damselflies. In contrast, there are many more genera and species of Narrow-winged Damselflies — more species, including many that look similar, makes this family the most challenging to learn!

Editor’s Note: Please comment to let me know whether the preceding information is helpful.

Related Resources:

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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