Posts Tagged ‘prey’

Life and death at Occoquan Bay revisited

September 16, 2018

I revisited the set of photos that I shot of an Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) with a fish in its talons, perched on a dead tree limb overhanging Fox Road at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia.

The Osprey was looking at me directly in the following photo. I wonder what the bird was thinking. With a piercing glare like that, I’m guessing he wasn’t thinking “Would you like to join me for lunch?”

23 AUG 2018 | Occoquan Bay NWR | Osprey (male, plus prey)

In stark contrast with the Osprey’s piercing glare, notice the fish’s vacant stare.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Advertisements

Another Black and Yellow Argiope

August 31, 2018

Another Black and Yellow Argiope (Argiope aurantia) was spotted during a photowalk along Deephole Point Road at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA. A cicada was trapped in the spider web.

23 AUG 2018 | OBNWR | Black and Yellow Argiope (plus prey)

This post is the last part in a three-part series related to predator and prey at Occoquan Bay. The photos in all three posts were taken on the same day.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

More predator/prey at Occoquan Bay

August 29, 2018

“Eat or be eaten” is perhaps the most fundamental law of nature. Predator-prey relationships can change suddenly: one minute a predator, such as a damselfly, is hunting for its next meal; next minute the damselfly becomes the prey and is a meal for another predator, such as a spider, elsewhere in the food web.

23 AUG 2018 | OBNWR | Black and Yellow Argiope (plus prey)

A Black and Yellow Argiope (Argiope aurantia) was spotted during a photowalk along Deephole Point Road at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA. A damselfly, possibly a Big Bluet (Enallagma durum), was trapped in the spider web.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Life and death at Occoquan Bay

August 27, 2018

An Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) was spotted perched on a dead tree limb overhanging Fox Road at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA. This individual, possibly a male, is shown with a fish in its talons.

23 AUG 2018 | Occoquan Bay NWR | Osprey (male, plus prey)

The fish appears to be an unknown species of goldfish. Did you notice the drop of blood in the preceding photo?

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Black-shouldered Spinyleg (female)

July 24, 2018

A Black-shouldered Spinyleg dragonfly (Dromogomphus spinosus) was spotted along an unnamed small creek in Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female, as indicated by her terminal appendages.

19 JUl 2018 | Fairfax County, VA | Black-shouldered Spinyleg (female)

The tip of the dragonfly’s right hind wing appears to be slightly malformed; her ability to fly didn’t seem to be impaired by the malformation.

Look at the full-size version of the following photo. Notice the fuzzy schmutz on her face and legs. I speculate the dragonfly might have enjoyed either a butterfly or moth for her last meal.

19 JUl 2018 | Fairfax County, VA | Black-shouldered Spinyleg (female)

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Camouflage

June 8, 2018

A Gray Petaltail dragonfly (Tachopteryx thoreyi) was spotted during a photowalk at Occoquan Regional Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, as indicated by his “indented” hind wings and terminal appendages.

04 JUN 2018 | Occoquan Regional Park | Gray Petaltail (male)

Look closely at the full-size version of all three images. Notice the dragonfly is eating a large, cream-colored winged insect, probably either a butterfly or moth.

04 JUN 2018 | Occoquan Regional Park | Gray Petaltail (male)

Many photographers “chimp” after every photo they take, that is, look at the image on the camera LCD. I chimp rarely — you can’t be sure an image is tack-sharp until you look at it on a large-screen display. In this case, it was so difficult to see the dragonfly perched on similarly colored tree bark that I chimped to be sure I’d actually nailed the shot. Don’t be fooled by the images in this post — significantly enhanced by post-processing — it was nearly impossible to see the subject!

04 JUN 2018 | Occoquan Regional Park | Gray Petaltail (male)

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Predator and prey

February 8, 2018

A Black and Yellow Argiope (Argiope aurantia) was spotted during a photowalk along Deephole Point Road at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA. A female Common Whitetail dragonfly (Plathemis lydia) is trapped in the spider web.

“Eat or be eaten” is perhaps the most fundamental law of nature. Predator-prey relationships can change suddenly: one minute a predator, such as a dragonfly, is hunting for its next meal; next minute the dragonfly becomes the prey and is a meal for another predator, such as a spider, elsewhere in the food web.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Familiar Bluet damselfly (female)

February 2, 2018

A Familiar Bluet damselfly (Enallagma civile) was spotted near a drainage ditch at a remote location in Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female.

The damselfly appears to be eating a smaller black insect, possibly a spider.

Editor’s Note: Sincere thanks to Mike Boatwright for verifying my tentative identification of the damselfly.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Lunch time

January 21, 2018

A Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum) was spotted at ~12:13 p.m. near a vernal pool at a remote location in Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, eating an unknown species of winged insect.

25 OCT 2017 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male, eating)

The first photo is the scene-setter.

25 OCT 2017 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male, eating)

The last two photos are cropped so that the predator and prey are more prominent. The dragonfly barely moved from the first-to-last photos; the position of the butterfly/moth moved slightly as it was eaten.

25 OCT 2017 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male, eating)

Did you notice there are three insects shown in each photo? Perhaps the fly is an opportunist, waiting to clean-up the leftovers from the dragonfly’s lunch.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

The ugly side of Mother Nature

October 1, 2017

A Big Bluet damselfly (Enallagma durum) was spotted during a photowalk along Deephole Point Road at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, eating a teneral damselfly.

10 SEP 2017 | Occoquan Bay NWR | Big Bluet (male, eating prey)

I think they may both be Big Bluets. Source Credit: Michael Moore, Virginia Odonata Facebook group.

Some species of odonates are cannibals, that is, they feed on their own species. And there it is — the ugly side of Mother Nature!

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


%d bloggers like this: