Posts Tagged ‘Saddleback Caterpillar Moth’

More Saddleback Caterpillar Moths

March 6, 2014

The following photographs show several Saddleback Caterpillar Moths (Acharia stimulea), a.k.a. “slug caterpillars,” spotted along the boardwalk in the central wetland area at Huntley Meadows Park on 30 September 2013.

The saddleback caterpillar, Acharia stimulea (formerly Sibene stimulea), is the larva of a species of moth native to eastern North America. The species belongs to the family of slug caterpillars, Limacodidae. Source Credit: BugGuide.

The head is at the top (relative to the photos), in case you’re wondering “Which end is up?”

Saddleback Caterpillar Moth (Acharia stimulea)

Saddleback Caterpillar Moth (Acharia stimulea)

Saddleback Caterpillar Moth (Acharia stimulea)

Copyright © 2014 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

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Saddleback Caterpillar Moth

December 20, 2013

Saddleback Caterpillar Moth (Acharia stimulea)

The preceding photograph shows a Saddleback Caterpillar Moth (Acharia stimulea), a.k.a. “slug caterpillar,” spotted along the boardwalk in the central wetland area at Huntley Meadows Park on 27 September 2013.

The saddleback caterpillar, Acharia stimulea (formerly Sibene stimulea), is the larva of a species of moth native to eastern North America. The species belongs to the family of slug caterpillars, Limacodidae. Source Credit: BugGuide.

Saddleback caterpillars remind me of Ewoks! More conventional thinkers see them differently.

The brown spot [dorsal side] looks like a saddle, and the green area looks like a saddle blanket; hence, the common name. Source Credit: Stinging and Venomous Caterpillars.

Special thanks to Dr. Edward Eder, a gifted amateur naturalist and photographer, for introducing the caterpillar to me and for answering my follow-up question months later, “Which end is up?” The head is at the top (relative to the photo), according to Ed.

Copyright © 2013 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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