Posts Tagged ‘Strix varia’

THE StriX-FILES | Re-opened

January 2, 2016

I spotted a Demon Owl at Huntley Meadows Park on New Year’s Eve. Kidding! The owl was roosting high in an evergreen tree, and the sky was almost completely overcast during the afternoon on a winter day. Think dim, diffuse light. As a result, I had to goose the power ratio of my external flash unit so high that it caused “red eye.”

Flash light reflected from blood behind the retina causes the “red-eye effect.” I removed the red-eye in post-processing (see below), but the owl looks possessed in the unedited version!

All joking aside, comparing and contrasting the before/after photos enables the viewer to get a clear picture of the owl’s large pupils, an adaptation that enhances night vision.

A Barred Owl (Strix varia) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is shown roosting high in an evergreen tree.

31 DEC 2015 | Huntley Meadows Park | Barred Owl (Strix varia)

In my experience, Barred Owls (Strix varia) prefer to roost in evergreen trees during the months when leaves have fallen from deciduous trees. Although this photograph will never win any awards, it is a good illustration of two related points: evergreen trees provide cover from other birds that harrass owls; owls are well-camouflaged in this environment.

A Barred Owl (Strix varia) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is shown roosting high in an evergreen tree.

31 DEC 2015 | Huntley Meadows Park | Barred Owl (Strix varia)

Related Resource: THE X-FILES returns to FOX television with a six-part mini-series! Gee, can you tell I’m a fan of the original TV series?

THE X-FILES debuts with a special two-night event beginning Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016 (10:00-11:00 PM ET/7:00-8:00 PM PT), following the NFC CHAMPIONSHIP GAME, and continuing with its time period premiere on Monday, Jan. 25 (8:00-9:00 PM ET/PT). Source Credit: The X-Files YouTube channel.

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Barred Owl (predator-prey)

May 17, 2012

A Barred Owl (Strix varia) spotted during a photowalk through Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. The owl is eating an unknown smaller bird it just captured. Photo 3 of 4 features the best view of the unknown bird — can anyone identify its species?

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Copyright © 2012 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Barred Owl (female), redux

May 5, 2012

A Barred Owl (Strix varia) shown by Kent Knowles, president of The Raptor Conservancy of Virginia. This “teaching bird” has several disabilities that make it unsuitable for release to the wild: the owl’s left hip was crushed when it was hit by a car; the bird has limited use of its very fragile left leg as a result.

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The owl was one of several birds featured in a raptor demonstration at the Belle Haven picnic area, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. The event was hosted by Friends of Dyke Marsh, National Park Service, and The Raptor Conservancy of Virginia.

The owl is featured in a previous post: Barred Owl (female).

Copyright © 2012 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Barred Owl (female)

April 23, 2012

A Barred Owl (Strix varia) shown by Kent Knowles, president of The Raptor Conservancy of Virginia. This “teaching bird” has several disabilities that make it unsuitable for release to the wild: the owl’s left hip was crushed when it was hit by a car; the bird has limited use of its very fragile left leg as a result.

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The owl was one of several birds featured in a raptor demonstration at the Belle Haven picnic area, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. The event was hosted by Friends of Dyke Marsh, National Park Service, and The Raptor Conservancy of Virginia.

Copyright © 2012 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Barred Owl

April 6, 2012

A Barred Owl (Strix varia) spotted during a photowalk through the “Wildlife Sanctuary,” one of seven small parks in the community of Hollin Hills, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

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A resident of Hollin Hills told me about a nesting pair of “owls” in the Wildlife Sanctuary. I searched for the owls for over a year; no luck. I decided to look again for my great white whale. My persistence paid off! I heard the owls calling each other (call, return call); one owl sounded closer to me. I moved toward the louder sound and spotted the Barred Owl shown in the preceding gallery.

Copyright © 2012 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Barred Owl

February 6, 2012

A Barred Owl (Strix varia) playing peek-a-boo from high a-top an evergreen tree. I spotted this beautiful bird during a photowalk through Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

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As you can see, my view of the bird was backlighted by the Sun and somewhat obstructed by the tree. When I started moving to get a better look, the bird flew away from its perch and headed into the forest — end of photo opportunity!

Tech Tips: The lens of my new Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150 camera was set on maximum telephoto (600 mm). The photo was cropped and adjusted using Apple “Aperture,” a professional-grade tool for organizing and adjusting photos.

Copyright © 2012 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved. www.wsanford.com

Barred Owl feathers

August 3, 2011
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The preceding photos show a couple of Barred Owl feathers that I found last summer while walking through a residential neighborhood located beside Kirk Park, a large wooded area in Fairfax County, Virginia USA. Paul Spring, a small stream, flows through the park year-round. The larger feather is ~12″ L x 2″ W; the smaller feather is ~10″ L x 1″ wide. I found the feathers in almost the same location, about a week apart. Thanks to Steffi, a Project Noah citizen scientist, for correctly identifying my unknown bird feathers!


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