Posts Tagged ‘Where’s Waldo?’

Answer key, The “Bridge to Nowhere”

April 1, 2016

In The “Bridge to Nowhere” — the last post in my photoblog — readers were challenged to guess the location in Huntley Meadows Park where the following photograph was taken.

The "Bridge to Nowhere," located along an informal trail at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

The following interactive map shows the exact location of the bridge as well as several associated waypoints. Click on the icon that looks like a stylized picture frame (located in the upper-right corner of the map) in order to “View larger map.” Zoom in on the map; click-and-drag to reposition the map. Click on the colored balloons for more information. The bridge is marked by a red balloon.

The following sign is posted near the bridge. The sign is brown and white although the colors look weird in the light of my camera flash, probably due to reflective paint used to make the sign.

A sign posted near the "Bridge to Nowhere," located along an informal trail at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

Believe me when I tell you every word on the sign is true. The trail, such as it is, leads to the northern boundary of the park. In  my opinion, there’s relatively little if anything to see that’s worth the effort required to walk this trail — you know, there’s a reason I nicknamed this bridge the “Bridge to Nowhere!” The following quote from my journal of field notes, dated 09 March 2016, further illustrates the point.

I was determined to thoroughly explore the part of HMP referred to as the “northern wetland” (NW) or “upper wetland.” I checked it out on 23 September 2015, albeit quickly rather than thoroughly. I decided to explore the “informal trail” beyond the “Bridge to Nowhere”/NW. I walked and walked until I had only the sketchiest idea of where I was. Eventually, I came to one of the park boundaries: there were houses along the property line; one house has chickens in the backyard! Anyway, I had no clear idea how to get back to the NW without retracing my steps so I decided to wing it. A long slog later — featuring lots of mud bogs and thorny vines — I made it to the side of the NW I didn’t explore last year. I renamed the location: Instead of Northern Marsh, I now refer to it as the “Northern Mush” because of the sucking mud that seems to be everywhere. I thought the location might be a good habitat for dragonflies and damselflies. Let’s just say I’m over it. Don’t waste your time — not much to see there! Source Credit: Walter Sanford, Photowalking Field Notes.

Associated Waypoints

The following photorealistic 32-bit HDR image of the “Northern Wetland” is a composite of three bracketed exposures, +/- two stops of exposure.

P1330495-Edit

09 MAR 2016 | Huntley Meadows Park | Northern Wetland

The last photo shows the view looking upstream (toward the “Northern Wetland”) along an unnamed creek that crosses the Hike-Bike Trail at Huntley Meadows Park. For more information about the stream, click on the waypoint marker in the interactive Google Map (shown above). See also Snowy scenes along the Hike-Bike Trail, posted in the aftermath of the “Blizzard of 2016.”

Looking upstream along an unnamed creek that crosses the Hike-Bike Trail at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

01 FEB 2016 | Huntley Meadows Park | Unnamed creek

Tech Tips: I used Google Maps to create the custom map that is embedded in this post. The following resources were helpful in figuring out how to customize- and share the map.

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

The “Bridge to Nowhere”

March 30, 2016

Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, children of all ages — it’s time for another exciting episode of “Where’s Waldo?” Please comment if you think you know my location.

The Backstory

While photowalking unexplored areas at Huntley Meadows Park on 16 March 2016, I passed a familiar place I’ve visited many times in the past.

The "Bridge to Nowhere," located along an informal trail at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain, er, shadows!

The "Bridge to Nowhere," located along an informal trail at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

Editor’s Note: The location of the “Bridge to Nowhere” will be revealed in a follow-up post.

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Answer key, Raiders of the Lost Park

March 16, 2016

In Raiders of the Lost Park, a.k.a., “The Wall” — the last post in my photoblog — readers were challenged to guess the location in Huntley Meadows Park where the following photograph was taken.

Building ruins as viewed from an unknown location at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

11 March 2016 | Huntley Meadows Park | Building ruins

After shooting the preceding photograph, I used the Apple “Compass” app (free) for iPhone to determine my exact location. Tech Tip: Capture an image of the iPhone screen by pressing the “Home” and “Power” buttons simultaneously.

Next, open Google Maps in a Web browser; click on the button labeled “Earth” (lower-left corner of window). Enter the following text string (refer to the “Compass” app screen capture, shown above) in the field labeled “Search Google Maps”: 38 46 3 N 77 7 1 W. Press the “return” key; the following satellite image/map should appear.

Pretty cool, huh? Well, now you know my exact location when I photographed the “The Wall.” Notice the “Compass” app also shows I was facing south-southwest when the photo was taken. In other words, I was standing where the red pin appears on the map, facing toward the bottom, a little left of center (relative to the map).

Hiking Directions: From the parking lot at the head-end of the Hike-Bike Trail, walk uphill along S. Kings Hwy. Stop at at the BEGINNING of the guard rail. Look to the right (about 1:30 to 2 o’clock) and you can see the building ruins. Walk a straight line path between the beginning of the guard rail and the ruins; there are fewer thorny vines along this route than I encountered/suffered by following the directions given to me!

Tech Tip: Some of my fellow WordPress bloggers may be wondering, “How did you embed an interactive Google Map in this post?” WordPress “Support” is your friend: Support / Google Maps / Embedding a Google Map.

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Raiders of the Lost Park

March 14, 2016

It’s time for another exciting episode of “Where’s Waldo?” In this case, “Where’s Walldo?” Please comment if you think you know my location.

The Backstory

While photowalking unexplored areas at Huntley Meadows Park on 11 March 2016, I visited an interesting place that a friend discovered recently. The directions to this location that I was given were a little sketchy, but hey, I found it because I am nothing if not persistent!

Building ruins as viewed from an unknown location at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

The first two photos show building ruins as seen from an unknown location at Huntley Meadows Park, viewed from “outside” and “inside” the walls. The reinforced concrete walls are more than a foot thick!

Building ruins as viewed from an unknown location at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

The last photo shows signage located near the building ruins. “FCPA” stands for Fairfax County Park Authority.

Signage near building ruins in an unknown location at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

By the way, I’m fairly certain the sign should say “Metal detecting and relic hunting are illegal in the park.” Bad grammar should be illegal too!

Editor’s Notes: The location of “The Wall” will be revealed in a follow-up post. My friend (who prefers to remain nameless) is not eligible to enter the contest since he told me about the place where these photos were taken.

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Answer key, Where’s Waldo?

January 24, 2016

In Where’s Waldo? — the last post in my photoblog — readers were challenged to guess the location in Huntley Meadows Park where the following photograph was taken.

The "Mystery Pool" spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

14 JAN 2016 | Huntley Meadows Park | “Mystery Pool”

After shooting the preceding photograph, I used the Apple “Compass” app (free) for iPhone to determine my exact location. Tech Tip: Capture an image of the iPhone screen by pressing the “Home” and “Power” buttons simultaneously.

Next, open Google Maps in a Web browser; click on the button labeled “Earth” (lower-left corner of window). Enter the following text string (refer to the “Compass” app screen capture, shown above) in the field labeled “Search Google Maps”: 38 45 8 N 77 6 44 W. Press the “return” key; the following satellite image/map should appear.

Pretty cool, huh? Well, now you know my exact location when I photographed the “Mystery Pool.” Notice the “Compass” app also shows I was facing south-southwest when the photo was taken. In other words, I was standing where the red pin appears on the map, facing toward the bottom, a little left of center (relative to the map).

Tech Tip: Some of my fellow WordPress bloggers may be wondering, “How did you embed an interactive Google Map in this post?” WordPress “Support” is your friend: Support / Google Maps / Embedding a Google Map.

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Where’s Waldo?

January 22, 2016

Where’s Waldo? Please comment if you think you know my location.

The "Mystery Pool" spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

ISO 100 | 4.5mm (25mm) | -3ev | f/4 | 1/2000s

The Backstory

While photowalking unexplored trails at Huntley Meadows Park on 14 January 2016, I discovered a place that I nicknamed the “Mystery Pool.”

Tech Tips: I used my Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150 superzoom camera (superseded by the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200 superzoom camera) to shoot the preceding photo. The camera was set for manual focus and aperture priority; the lens was focused at the hyperfocal distance for an aperture of f/4, based upon the instructions provided in the excellent video tutorial by Graham Houghton, “Panasonic Lumix FZ camera easier manual focus method — super point-and-shoot tip.” Focusing at the hyperfocal distance is a technique used in landscape photography that maximizes depth-of-field. For example, when my camera is set for maximum wide angle (4.5mm) at an aperture of f/4, everything is in focus from approximately three feet to infinity — that’s DEEP depth-of-field!

Look closely at the full-size version of the photo. Notice the purple fringing that appears along the edges of some tree limbs (especially near the Sun) and along the ice (near the center of the foreground). Chromatic aberration is the technical name for color fringing that occurs sometimes in photographs of high contrast subjects such as the dark tree limbs against a bright sky. Adobe Lightroom features several photo editing tools that work well for removing chromatic aberration. If the image featured in this post were a fine-art landscape photo, then I would edit the image to remove the chromatic aberration. In this case, the photo is intended to show the view from one edge of the “Mystery Pool,” and it is good enough for that purpose, warts and all.

Related Resource: The “Mystery Pool” during Winter 2016.

Editor’s Notes: The location of the “Mystery Pool” will be revealed in a follow-up postMike Powell is not eligible to enter the contest since I told him where this photo was taken.

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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