Archive for the ‘Canon EF 100mm Macro lens’ Category

Fujifilm X-T3: Focus Peak Highlight

September 6, 2022

I like to use manual focus to shoot photographs with my Fujifilm X-T3 digital camera. Set the small dial on the front of the camera to “M.” The beauty of manual focus on Fujifilm X-series cameras is back-button auto-focus still works!

When the small dial is set for “M” both manual focusing and back-button auto-focusing can be used in combination with what Fujifilm calls “Focus Peak Highlight,” or more simply, “focus peaking.”

The following YouTube video by pal2tech explains a technique that makes it much easier to see the focus peaking.

The process is simple. Set the camera to record JPG + RAF [Fujifilm’s proprietary raw format]. Select one of the black-and-white Fujifilm film simulations, e.g., ACROS. [More about Fujifilm film simulations in an upcoming blog post.]

The camera display will be black-and-white. As Chris Lee (pal2tech) explains in the preceding video, it’s much easier to see focus peaking on a black-and-white background.

JPG files saved to a memory card are black-and-white too, as shown below.

Buzz Lightyear plastic toy. [Focus Peak Highlight not shown.]

RAF files are saved in full color, as shown below.

Buzz Lightyear plastic toy.

Tech Tips

“Focus Peak Highlight” can be activated when the camera is set for manual focus mode. Using back-button focus (AF-L button) in manual mode enables one to retain full control of the exposure triangle, focus quickly, and see what’s in focus before shooting a photograph.

Fuji Back Button Focus (4:06), a YouTube video by Ashraf Jandali, provides a clear demonstration of how to use back-button focus on the Fujifilm X-T1. The same technique works with the Fujifilm X-T3.

Related Resources

Copyright © 2022 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Sample photos: Fringer EF-FX Pro II lens mount adapter

September 2, 2022

Oh look, it’s the “Made in the shade” monkey and Buzz Lightyear — two of my favorite studio models! Whenever I need to test new photography gear and/or techniques, they are always willing to help.

As promised in my last blog post, here are a couple of sample photos taken with my Canon EF 100mm macro lens mounted on a Fujifilm X-T3 digital camera body using a Fringer EF-FX Pro II lens mount adapter.

Single point focus was used for both photos. For the first photo, the focus point was located on the monkey’s right eye (bottom eye, relative to the photo). The real world size of the toy monkey is ~4.8 cm long.

“Made in the shade” monkey toy.

The Canon lens is controlled by the Fujifilm digital camera via the Fringer adapter. EXIF information (shown below) is available for each photo. As you can see, the photos in this set were taken using an aperture of f/5.6 and a shutter speed of 1/250 s, the default sync speed for the X-T3.

The “sweet spot” for the Canon EF 100mm macro lens is either f/5.6 or f/8. The depth of field is shallower at f/5.6 than f/8, but I thought the former might be a better test for sharpness than the latter.

Apple Preview | Inspector

Buzz Lightyear reporting for duty, sir. I don’t remember exactly where the focus point was located, but it was probably somewhere near Buzz’s face/head.

Buzz Lightyear plastic toy.

Regular readers of my blog might be happy to know Buzz will be back again for my next blog post.

What are the take-ways?

As you can see, my Canon macro lens works well with the Fujifilm camera. Does it perform better than my Fujinon 80mm macro lens? It’s too early to tell.

The APS-C sensor inside the Fujifilm X-T3 digital camera has a crop factor of 1.5x, so the Canon EF 100mm macro lens has a focal length of 150mm (35mm equivalent) when mounted on an X-T3. The net result is an increase in apparent magnification.

Some of the advantages of mounting the Canon lens on a Fujifim digital camera (rather than my older Canon DSLR camera) are really about features available on the X-T3 that enable me to get more from the same lens.

For example, there are only nine (9) focus points on my Canon EOS 5D Mark II; the Fujifilm X-T3 can be set for either 117 or 425.

The Canon EOS 5D Mark II doesn’t feature focus peaking; the Fujifilm X-T3 does. Focus peaking is a useful aid for focusing the Canon lens manually. More about this topic in my next blog post.

And of course, don’t forget that all of my Canon lenses (including several L-series lenses) can be used with my Fujifilm cameras via the Fringer adapter. I’m especially looking forward to testing the Fringer adapter with my Canon MP-E 65mm Macro lens.

In summary, the Canon/Fringer/Fujifilm rig works as expected. During limited testing, I discovered something that doesn’t work. (Again, more about this topic in an upcoming blog post.) The problem isn’t a deal-breaker and it should be something that can be fixed in a firmware update of the Fringer adapter. Editor’s Note: I just contacted Fringer as of this writing. I’m interested to see whether they are receptive to customer suggestions for improvement. I’ll update this post to include their response. Post Update: Fringer replied to my message promptly. Details in an upcoming blog post.

Related Resources

Copyright © 2022 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

What’s wrong with these pictures?

August 23, 2022

Remember “What’s wrong with this picture?” puzzles? For example, a kangaroo hidden in a tower of giraffes. That’s right, “tower” is the collective noun for a group of giraffes. So what’s wrong with the following pictures?

Nothing is “wrong” with the pictures, other than the fact that they are quick-and-dirty photos taken using my Apple iPad mini 6 camera and built-in flash. But there is something incongruous. Look closely and you should notice that a Canon lens is mounted on a Fujifilm camera body. How is that possible?

A closer view shows a Fringer EF-FX Pro II lens mount adapter located between the Canon lens and Fujifilm camera body. Net result: The Canon lens works with my Fufifilm camera just like Fujifilm/Fujinon lenses.

During limited testing, the lens worked perfectly with the camera. I plan to post some test shots in an upcoming blog post.

The Backstory

The Canon EF 100mm macro lens is one of my favorite lenses — it takes tack-sharp photos that look great! I don’t use the lens as often as I should because my Canon EOS 5D Mark II DSLR isn’t as feature-rich as relatively newer digital cameras such as my Fujifilm X-T3.

I’ve been thinking about upgrading my 5D Mark II to one of the two new Canon APS-C sensor camera models, but for now I decided to save money and buy the Fringer adapter instead. So far so good!

Related Resources

Copyright © 2022 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Follow-up: Raynox DCR-250 close-up filter

August 20, 2021

In my last blog post, I mentioned that minor vignetting can be a problem when the Raynox DCR-250 close-up filter is mounted on some macro- and non-macro camera lenses.

Canon 100mm macro lens

In case you’re wondering whether vignetting is a problem when using two step-down rings with the Canon 100mm macro lens, it isn’t. As it turns out, the front lens element is recessed quite a bit from the lens barrel so the step-down rings cover little if any glass. Source Credit: Raynox DCR-250 close-up filter, by Walter Sanford.

The first photo shows the front lens element of the Canon 100mm macro lens is in fact recessed quite a bit from the lens barrel.

Lens barrel without nested step-down rings.

The next photo shows the nested 67-52mm and 52-43mm step-down rings that I use to mount the Raynox DCR-250 on my Canon 100mm macro lens. Look closely at the full-size version of this image and you should see the step-down rings don’t cover any of the camera lens.

Lens barrel with nested step-down rings.

Disclaimer: This might or might not be true for other makes and models of 100mm macro lenses.

Panasonic Lumix superzoom bridge cameras

The camera lens will need to be adjusted for at least some slight telephoto zoom in order to eliminate the vignetting caused by mounting a 43mm filter on a lens with a 52mm filter size. Source Credit: Raynox DCR-250 close-up filter, by Walter Sanford.

A Guide To Using Raynox Close Up Lenses on the FZ200 Camera, by Graham Houghton is the second item listed under “Related Resources” in my last blog post. Page 6 of Graham’s excellent guide describes a simple way to set-up both my Panasonic Lumix DCR-150 and DCR-300 superzoom bridge cameras so that vignetting isn’t a problem.

For the DMC-FZ300, press the “Menu/Set” button on the back of the camera, then select the camera icon in the left side-bar. Navigate to page 7/7 and select “Conversion”; select the icon for close-up lens. When the camera is powered-on, it will zoom to 4x (121 mm) automatically and the aperture will be limited to f/4 or smaller (f/4 to f/8).

For my older DMC-FZ150, the set-up process is the same except “Conversion” appears on page 5/5. Zoom is set to 4x and the aperture is limited to f/3.6 or smaller (f/3.6 to f/8).

Using either camera, the lens can be adjusted for greater than 4x zoom, resulting in more magnification.

Copyright © 2021 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Raynox DCR-250 close-up filter

August 17, 2021

I watched a video by Micael Widell recently that reminded me the Raynox DCR-250 close-up filter is a good value given its versatility.

Before I bought the Raynox close-up filter many years ago, I was skeptical that it would work. I still can’t explain why it works with many lenses I own including both macro- and non-macro lenses, but I can tell you with certainty it does work and works well!

Canon 100mm macro lens

The Canon 100mm macro lens has a maximum magnification of 1:1. Micael Widell says adding the Raynox DCR-250 close-up filter to the lens increases the magnification from 1x to 2x. According the B&H Photo Specs page for the Raynox DCR-250 close-up filter, its magification is 2.5x.

Calculating magnification is tricky and not as straightforward as one might think. In this case it doesn’t matter whether Mr. Widell or B&H Photo is correct, the fact of the matter is adding a Raynox DCR-250 close-up filter to your lens should at least double the magnification.

The first photograph shows the following equipment, couterclockwise from the upper-left: “snap-on universal adapter” for Raynox DCR-250 close-up filter; Raynox close-up filter mounted on a 52-43mm step-down ring; and a 67-52mm step-down ring.

Several mounting adapters for Raynox DCR-250 close-up filter.

The Raynox DCR-250 close-up filter comes with a “snap-on universal adapter” for mounting the filter on lenses with a filter size from 52-67mm. The universal adapter clips on the front of a lens the same as a lens cap. That’s OK for use in a photo studio but less than ideal for use in the field. In my opinion, it’s better to use inexpensive step-down rings to mount the close-up filter more securely.

Canon EOS 5D Mark II macro photography kit.

The Rube Goldberg rig shown above has a lot of parts, but for the purpose of this blog post focus on the Canon 100mm macro lens and Raynox DCR-250 mounted on the lens using nested 67-52mm and 52-43mm step-down rings.

In case you’re wondering whether vignetting is a problem when using two step-down rings with the Canon 100mm macro lens, it isn’t. As it turns out, the front lens element is recessed quite a bit from the lens barrel so the step-down rings cover little if any glass.

Panasonic Lumix superzoom bridge cameras

Both my Panasonic Lumix DCR-150 and DCR-300 superzoom bridge cameras feature a 52mm filter thread size. So it’s simple to use a 52-43mm step-down ring to mount the Raynox DCR-250 close-up filter on either camera lens.

Raynox DCR-250 not mounted on the camera lens.

The camera lens will need to be adjusted for at least some slight telephoto zoom in order to eliminate the vignetting caused by mounting a 43mm filter on a lens with a 52mm filter size.

Both cameras feature a 24x zoom lens, so when the Raynox DCR-250 is added to the kit the actual magnification will vary depending upon the focal length for which the camera lens is set.

Raynox DCR-250 shown mounted on the camera lens.

Related Resources

Copyright © 2021 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

MYN – Anisoptera exuvia (dorsal view)

March 16, 2020

An Anisoptera exuvia (species unknown) was collected by Mike Powell, my good friend and photowalking buddy. Although the exact date and location are unknown, we know the specimen was collected sometime during 2019 somewhere in Northern Virginia.

The specimen is definitely a dragonfly, probably from either Family Corduliidae (Emeralds) or Family Libellulidae (Skimmers), as indicated by its mask-like labium and thin antennae. Notice the row of mid-dorsal hooks located along several abdominal segments.

2019 | Anisoptera exuvia (dorsal view)

Related Resource: MYN – Anisoptera exuvia (species unknown). [Face-head-dorsal view of the same specimen featured in this blog post.]

Tech Tips

This subject was photographed against a pure white background (255, 255, 255) using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique.

Three photos were used to create a composite image: one photo focused on the head; another focused on the mid-abdomen; and a third focused on abdominal segment 10 (S10).

For what it’s worth, the following camera settings were used to shoot all three photos: 100mm; ISO 100; f/8; 1/200 s; 0 ev. The power ratios for an array of four external flash units were as follows: Group A = 1/2 +0.3 (primary backlight); Group B = off (secondary backlight); Group C = 1/4 (subject, stage right); Group D = 1/16 (subject, handheld stage left).

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

MYN – Anisoptera exuvia (species unknown)

March 13, 2020

An Anisoptera exuvia (species unknown) was collected by Mike Powell, my good friend and photowalking buddy. Although the exact date and location are unknown, we know the specimen was collected sometime during 2019 somewhere in Northern Virginia.

The specimen is definitely a dragonfly, probably from either Family Corduliidae (Emeralds) or Family Libellulidae (Skimmers), as indicated by its mask-like labium and thin antennae.

2019 | Anisoptera exuvia (face-head-dorsal)

Related Resource: MYN – Anisoptera exuvia (dorsal view). [Dorsal view of the same specimen featured in this blog post.]

Tech Tips

This subject was photographed against a pure white background (255, 255, 255) using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique.

Three photos were used to create a composite image: two photos focused on the head; and another photo focused on the prementum. I must say I’m fairly pleased by the way the final image turned out, best appreciated by viewing the full-size version of the composite.

My Canon EOS 5D Mark II is a full-frame DSLR digital camera. RAW images are 5616 × 3744 pixels. The dimensions of the composite image are 5385 × 3657 pixels, that is, slightly smaller than full-frame. It’s usually necessary to crop composite images, at least a little, because the individual photos used to create the composite don’t align perfectly, even when the camera is mounted on a tripod (as it was in this case).

For what it’s worth, the following camera settings were used to shoot all three photos: 100mm; ISO 100; f/8; 1/200 s; 0 ev. The power ratios for an array of four external flash units were as follows: Group A = 1/16 (primary backlight); Group B = 1/32 (secondary backlight); Group C = 1/4 (subject, stage right); Group D = 1/8 (subject, handheld stage left).

I’m still searching for the “sweet spot” for this camera/lens combo. The white background was slightly under-exposed by approximately 1.5 stops, so I need to increase the flash power ratios for Group A and B. The subject was exposed almost perfectly, so Group C and D are close to spot on. Trial and error is the MYN way!

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

MYN – Anisoptera exuvia (species unknown)

March 11, 2020

An Anisoptera exuvia (species unknown) was collected near a small pond at Occoquan Regional Park (ORP), Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

This individual probably is a member of the Family Libellulidae (Skimmers), as indicated by its anal pyramid. The small pond where the specimen was collected is perfect habitat for skimmers.

01 JUN 2019 | ORP | Anisoptera exuvia (dorsallateral view)

Related Resource: Another unknown species of odonate exuvia – a blog post by Walter Sanford featuring a “one-off” photo (that is, not a composite image) of the same specimen.

Tech Tips

This subject was photographed against a pure white background (255, 255, 255) using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique.

Two photos were used to create a composite image: one photo focused on the head; and another photo focused on abdominal segments seven (S7) through nine (S9).

My Canon EOS 5D Mark II is a full-frame DSLR digital camera. RAW images are 5616 × 3744 pixels. The dimensions of the composite image are 5589 × 3743 pixels, that is, essentially full-frame. It’s usually necessary to crop composite images, at least a little, because the individual photos used to create the composite don’t align perfectly, even when the camera is mounted on a tripod (as it was in this case).

For what it’s worth, the following camera settings were used to shoot both photos: 100mm; ISO 100; f/8; 1/200 s; 0 ev. I need to tweak the settings a little in order to find the “sweet spot” for this camera/lens combo: the white background was slightly over-exposed; and the subject was slightly under-exposed. Of course that means I need to tweak the flash power for the backlights and add one or more additional external flash units for more fill flash. Overall, I’m fairly satisfied with the results of my first attempt using the MYN technique with this camera rig.

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Post update: Aeshna umbrosa exuvia

January 8, 2020

Male odonates have two sets of sex organs: primary genitalia located on abdominal segment nine (S9); and secondary genitalia located on abdominal segments two-to-three (S2-3).

Closer examination of some test shots of the following Shadow Darner dragonfly (Aeshna umbrosa) exuvia, photographed on 02 December 2018, showed both sets of vestigial genitalia are clearly visible on the ventral side of this specimen.

Aeshna umbrosa (mating pair)

All odonates (dragonflies and damselflies) have a 10-segmented abdomen, numbered from front to back. Male dragonfly secondary genitalia, called hamules, are located in segments two and three (S2 and S3); female genitalia in segment eight (S8). Male and female dragonflies form the mating wheel in order for their genitalia to connect during copulation.

A. umbrosa (in wheel). Photo used with permission from Patrick Boez.

Related Resource: Test shots: Aeshna umbrosa exuvia.

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Cordulegaster sp. larva (dorsal view)

February 25, 2019

This post features a focus-stacked composite image that shows a dorsal view of an odonate larva/nymph from the Family Cordulegastridae (Spiketails) that was collected and reared by Bob Perkins. The larva died before it metamorphosed into an adult.

Cordulegaster sp. larva (female) | dorsal view

Most larvae go through 10-13 stages of development known as “instars.” The author lacks sufficient experience to identify the instar of this specimen, although it appears to be one of the later stages as indicated by its well-developed wing pads.

Related Resources

Tech Tips

12 photos were used to create the focus stack. A single focus point was positioned over select anatomical features; photos were taken at each point of interest.

The following equipment was used to shoot all of the photographs for the focus-stacked composite image, shown above: Canon EOS 5D Mark II digital camera, in manual mode; Kenko 20mm macro automatic extension tubeCanon EF100mm f/2.8L Macro lens (set for manual focus); and Canon MT-26EX-RT Macro Twin Lite set for “Master” mode, and several external flashes set for “Slave” mode including Canon 580 EX- and Canon 580EX II Speedlites and a Godox TT685C Thinklite TTL Flash fitted with a Lastolite Ezybox Speed-Lite 2 flash modifier.

Auto power-off was disabled for the camera and all external flash units.

Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to create the focus-stacked composite image, as well as spot-heal and sharpen the final output.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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