Archive for the ‘digital photography’ Category

Last man standing

July 14, 2018

One, possibly two Sable Clubtail dragonfly (Stenogomphurus rogersi) was/were spotted perched alongside a small stream located in Fairfax County, Virginia USA. All individuals featured in this photo set are male, as indicated by their indented hind wings and terminal appendages.

Male 1

The first shot is a “record shot,” that is, a quick-and-dirty shot that provides a record of the spotting. In this case, I was able to shoot one photo before Male 1 flew away. I didn’t see where he landed.

26 JUN 2018 | Fairfax County, VA | Sable Clubtail (male)

Male 2

I found Male 2 perched on overhanging vegetation along a nearby cut bank in the stream channel.

26 JUN 2018 | Fairfax County, VA | Sable Clubtail (male)

Notice the prominent peach-colored schmutz on the right forewing, located near the pterostigma, that is visible in both photos of Male 2. Since I don’t see the schmutz in the photo of Male 1, I think Male 1 and 2 are probably different individuals.

26 JUN 2018 | Fairfax County, VA | Sable Clubtail (male)

New late date?

Dr. Edward Eder and I visited the same site on the same day. Dr. Eder is one of the best all-around amateur naturalists I know. Ed saw/photographed a male Sable Clubtail near the same location as my photos, a little earlier in the day. Both of us thought we’d set a new late-date for S. rogersi in Northern Virginia. As it turns out, I spotted a female Sable Clubtail on 05 July 2018. Photos of the female will be featured in my next blog post.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

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Gray on gravel

July 12, 2018

A Gray Petaltail dragonfly (Tachopteryx thoreyi) was spotted during a photowalk at Occoquan Regional Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

This individual is a male, as indicated by his terminal appendages. He was perched on a gravel road, much to my surprise.

24 JUN 2018 | Occoquan Regional Park | Gray Petaltail (male)

This is the first Gray Petaltail that I’ve seen at the park since 04 June 2018, when I saw several individuals near a forested seep.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Mocha male

July 10, 2018

The following photos show a Mocha Emerald dragonfly (Somatochlora linearis) perched alongside a small stream in the forest at a remote location in Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

This individual is a male, as indicated by his terminal appendages.

Mocha Emerald appears dark and featureless when viewed with the unaided eye in the shade of the forest canopy. More detail is revealed with added light from a fill flash.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

When Mocha flies

July 8, 2018

Many Mocha Emerald dragonflies (Somatochlora linearis) were spotted along a small stream in a remote location at Huntley Meadows Park (HMP), Fairfax County, Virginia USA. Most of the creek is shaded by the forest canopy — the perfect habitat for Mocha and mosquitos, a primary food source for all species of odonates.

05 JUL 2018 | HMP | Mocha Emerald (male, in flight)

Both individuals are male, shown hovering in flight above the water. Mocha Emerald males patrol back-and-forth along a short segment of the stream, stopping to hover in place sometimes.

05 JUL 2018 | HMP | Mocha Emerald (male, in flight)

Adult flight period

The adult flight period  for Mocha Emerald is from 16 June to 16 September (peaks in July-August), according to records for Northern Virginia maintained by Kevin Munroe, former manager at Huntley Meadows Park. In my experience, July is Mocha month in Northern Virginia.

According to records for the Commonwealth of Virginia maintained by Dr. Steve Roble, a zoologist at the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, Division of Natural Heritage, 22 June to 10 October is the adult flight period for Mocha Emerald.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Needham’s Skimmer dragonfly (female)

July 6, 2018

A Needham’s Skimmer dragonfly (Libellula needhami) was spotted during a photowalk at Occoquan Regional Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

This individual is a female, as indicated by her terminal appendages.

Female Needham’s Skimmers have a pair of flanges beneath their eighth abdominal segment that are used to scoop and hold a few drops of water when laying eggs (oviposition), hence the family name “Skimmer.” Remember that all dragonflies and damselflies have a 10-segmented abdomen, numbered from front to back.

The dragonfly was backlighted by the Sun. These photographs would have been impossible without the use of fill flash. Both photos are strong contenders for my Odonart Portfolio.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Widow Skimmer dragonfly (immature male)

July 4, 2018

A Widow Skimmer dragonfly (Libellula luctuosa) was spotted during a photowalk at Occoquan Regional Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

This individual is an immature male, as indicated by its coloration and terminal appendages. As a mature male, the front of his thorax and abdomen will be covered by white pruinescence.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Later the same day…

July 2, 2018

Later the same day that I spotted my first-of-year Black-shouldered Spinyleg dragonfly (Dromogomphus spinosus) at Prince William Forest Park (PWFP), Prince William County, Virginia USA, I spotted another one during a photowalk at Occoquan Regional Park in Fairfax County, Virginia.

This individual is a male, as indicated by his terminal appendages.

Adult flight period

The adult flight period for Black-shouldered Spinyleg is from 03 June to 12 September (peaks in July to August), according to records for Northern Virginia maintained by Kevin Munroe, former manager at Huntley Meadows Park. My earliest sighting is 21 June; my latest sighting is 08 August.

According to records for the Commonwealth of Virginia maintained by Dr. Steve Roble, a zoologist at the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, Division of Natural Heritage, 08 May to 10 October is the adult flight period for Black-shouldered Spinyleg.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Black-shouldered Spinyleg dragonfly (male)

June 30, 2018

A Black-shouldered Spinyleg dragonfly (Dromogomphus spinosus) was spotted during a stream-walk along South Fork Quantico Creek in Prince William Forest Park (PWFP), Prince William County, Virginia USA. This is my first-of-year sighting of this species.

This individual is a male, as indicated by his terminal appendages.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Citrine Forktail damselfly (male)

June 28, 2018

A Citrine Forktail damselfly (Ischnura hastata) was spotted during a stream-walk along South Fork Quantico Creek in Prince William Forest Park (PWFP), Prince William County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, as indicated by his coloration and terminal appendages.

26 JUN 2018 | PWFP | Citrine Forktail (male)

Citrine Forktail is the smallest species of damselfly in North America. Maybe that explains why it took so long to add Citrine to my life list of odonates!

Every reference I have read says Citrine habitat is lentic, that is, it prefers ponds and lakes rather than the lotic habit where I found the individual shown above. I wish I had carried one of my camera kits for macro photography, but I didn’t expect to see Citrine along a mid-size stream.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Ebony Jewelwing damselflies (mating pair)

June 26, 2018

A mating pair of Ebony Jewelwing damselflies (Calopteryx maculata) was spotted near a small forested stream at Occoquan Regional Park. The male is shown on the left; the female on the right.

The damselflies are “in wheel,” in which the male uses “claspers” (terminal appendages) at the end of his abdomen to hold the female by her neck/thorax while they are joined at their abdomens. The wheel position is sometimes referred to as “in heart” when damselflies mate.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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