Archive for the ‘Canon EOS 5D Mark II’ Category

Sumo Citrus still life

March 19, 2021

Have you seen/eaten Sumo Citrus? They’re easy to peel, seedless, and billed as “the sweetest orange.” Delicious, I say!

How I got the shots

I set up a tripod at a good distance from the subject for a 50mm lens. Then I switched cameras without moving the tripod. Each camera/lens combo was set for an aperture of f/8; other camera and flash settings varied as necessary. (See EXIF info for details regarding camera settings for each photo.)

Canon 5D Mark II

Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II lens (“Nifty 50”), Godox X2TC, Godox TT685C plus Lastolite flash modifier.

18 March 2021 | BoG Photo Studio | Sumo Citrus

Fujifilm X-T1

Fujinon 18-55mm zoom kit lens set for 34mm (51mm, 35mm equivalent), Godox XProF, Godox TT685C plus Lastolite flash modifier.

18 March 2021 | BoG Photo Studio | Sumo Citrus

Fujifilm X-T3

Fujifilm 11mm extension tube, Fujinon XF80mm macro lens, Vello Off-Camera TTL Flash Cord, Godox X2TF, Godox TT685C plus Lastolite flash modifier.

18 March 2021 | BoG Photo Studio | Sumo Citrus

Sumo Citrus from Giant Food

Bernard Nimmons is the produce manager at the Giant Food located in Beacon Center. I sent a Facebook Messenger message to Bernard recently…

I need Sumo Oranges STAT! Are they back in stock?

The following selfie photo is Bernard’s reply to my message. Now you can see why I always say “Bernard puts the ‘Pro’ in Produce.”

Selfie photo used with permission from Bernard Nimmons.

Copyright © 2021 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Tethered shooting using Canon EOS Utility

March 5, 2021

Canon EOS Utility (EOS-U) can be used to tether many models of Canon digital cameras with computers (running either macOS or Windows). For example, my Canon EOS 5D Mark II appears on the list of cameras supported by EOS-U.

Canon EOS-U is like a box of chocolates — you never know what you’re going to get! The way that tethering looks and functions seems to depend upon a combination of your camera model and your computer operating system.

My new 13″ Apple MacBook Air (M1, 2020) features the “Big Sur” macOS. The drop-down menu for “Operating System” (shown below) doesn’t list either “Big Sur” or “Catalina” — the last two versions of macOS. So I selected “macOS Mohave v10.14” …

and downloaded/installed “EOS Utility 2.14.31b for Mac OS X.”

Canon EOS Utility 2

Here’s how to get started. Tether your camera to a computer using an appropriate cable for your camera and computer.

Trouble-shooting tip: Set the camera Drive Mode for “One Shot” before tethering your camera to a computer. EOS Utility 2 doesn’t work when the Drive Mode of my Canon EOS 5D Mark II is set for Timer (either 2 s or 10 s).

Launch Canon EOS Utility 2, or EOS-U 3 if you are using a newer camera than me. The “Main Window” (shown below) should appear on screen. Click on “Camera settings/Remote shooting.”

The “Capture Window” (camera control panel) should appear on screen, as shown below.

Click on the button labeled “Preferences…” that is located in the lower-left corner of the “Capture Window” (camera control panel). The following screenshot shows all of the categories of preferences.

Select Preferences → Basic Settings in order to set the “Main Window” to show on startup. I recommend ticking the checkbox to automatically display the “Quick Preview” window whenever a photo is taken.

Select Preferences → Remote Shooting in order to set where photo files are saved. My camera is set to shoot RAW files only; CR2 files are saved to both my camera and computer, as indicated by the icon in the camera control panel that looks like a computer + camera.

Select Preferences → Destination Folder to specify the location where photo files will be saved on your computer. My preferences are as follows.

Help requested: A little help from my readers, please. What is the purpose of the “Monitor Folder,” shown in the preceding “Preferences” panel? I speculate it might be a folder that is watched by “Digital Photo Professional 4,” free photo editing software available from CanonUSA.

Subfolders within the “Destination Folder” are created automatically as per my preferences.

Select Preferences → Linked Software in order to set an application that will be used to open photo files automatically. In my case, I registered “Preview,” an Apple graphics utility.

When you click on the “Register…” button the first time, what you see varies depending upon whether you are using EOS Utility 2…

or EOS Utility 3. In either case, all of the default options are Canon applications. If you would prefer to link to a non-Canon application, then select “None” and press the “Register…” button again in order to browse the applications available on your computer.

The “Capture Window” (camera control panel, shown below) can be used to change some but not all settings for my Canon EOS 5D Mark II. The initial settings shown by EOS-U should be the same as your camera before it was tethered to your computer.

The grayed-out “M” indicates my camera is set for Manual shooting mode. The shooting mode (M, Av, Tv, P, etc.) cannot be changed in software — you must make that setting by turning the dial on your camera. Also, adjusting the focal length of a zoom lens cannot be done remotely by the software.

The camera settings shown in black can be adjusted remotely. For example, I set the White Balance for “Flash,” as indicated by the lightning flash icon. Press the virtual shutter button when you’re ready to take a photo.

EOS-U 2 seems to have no idea what type of lens is mounted on the camera. In this case, I used my Canon “Nifty 50” lens (EF 50mm f/1.8 II) to take some test shots. The “Quick Preview” panel appears after you take a photo. (The panel is resizable.)

Each photo also opens automatically in “Preview” based upon my settings in Preferences → Linked Software. To some extent, it’s redundant to open photos in both EOS-U “Quick Preview” and Apple “Preview.” My goal is simply to demonstrate for Fujifilm that Canon has shown it is possible to make “Linked Software” work on a computer running the Big Sur macOS.

Click the “Live View shoot…” button, located near the bottom of the “Capture Window” (camera control panel), in order to display the “Remote Live View window” (shown below). There you can set the focus point, and zoom in/out. Other options might be available depending upon your camera model.

Canon EOS Utility 3

Mike Powell, my good friend and photowalking buddy, experimented with his Canon EOS Rebel SL2 tethered to Canon EOS Utility 3. Sincere thanks to Mike for patiently helping me begin to figure out things that are software-dependent and things that are camera-dependent.

Your mileage might vary, but it’s worth noting that the “Capture Window” (camera control panel) for Mike’s Canon EOS Rebel SL2 shows several options that aren’t available for my older Canon EOS 5D Mark II. This is the box of chocolates thing that I mentioned at the beginning of this blog post.

For example, the Drive Mode [Single Shot, Continuous, Timers (2, 10 s)] can be set in EOS-U 3 (on Mike’s camera) but can’t be set in EOS-U 2 (on my camera).

Look closely at the “Capture Window” (camera control panel, shown above). Notice the icon for a movie camera located to the right of the “Live View shoot…” button. That button is supposed to enable remote video shooting; neither Mike nor I have tested the process.

Here’s a screenshot of the “Remote Live View window” on Mike’s computer. Notice the EOS-U 3 window features more buttons than EOS-U 2. Also notice the histogram shown in the lower-right corner, a useful tool that isn’t featured in EOS-U 2 using either Mike’s Canon EOS 50D or my Canon EOS 5D Mark II.

What are the take-aways?

Canon EOS Utility can do so much more than tethered shooting using Adobe Lightroom Classic that EOS-U is the tool of choice for tethered shooting with my Canon camera. I feel like I’ve just scratched the surface of what EOS-U can do, and I’m looking forward to further exploration and experimentation.

Who knows? The joy of tethered shooting with EOS-U — and the frustration of the limitations of the software when used with my older camera — might motivate me to buy a new Canon mirrorless digital camera. That is, assuming Canon introduces a pro-grade camera with an APS-C sensor at a sub-$4K price point. If I’m going to spend $4,000 or more for a camera — the current price range for higher end Canon mirrorless digital cameras — then I think my money would be better spent on one of the Fujifilm GFX medium format digital cameras.

Related Resources

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Copyright © 2021 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Tethered shooting using my Canon EOS 5D Mark II

March 2, 2021

Adobe Lightroom Classic can be used to tether many models of Canon and Nikon digital cameras with computers (running either macOS or Windows) that meet the system requirements. For example, my Canon EOS 5D Mark II appears on the list of tethered cameras supported by Lightroom Classic.

The Canon EOS 5D Mark II works as expected when tethered with Lightroom Classic. “Live View”¹ on the computer screen plus the ability to change camera settings and trigger the camera using Lightroom are among many features I like. And it’s FREE. Well, free as long as you have Lightroom Classic and that isn’t free.

Getting started

Here’s how to get started. Tether your camera to a computer using an appropriate cable for your camera and computer. Launch Lightroom. Select File → Tethered Capture → Start Tethered Capture…

The “Tethered Capture Settings” window appears on screen; carefully consider the settings you make (especially the “Destination”) since Lightroom doesn’t like it when you change the location of photo files on your computer!

After your camera is connected to the computer successfully, select File → Show Tethered Capture Window. “Command-T” is the keyboard shortcut to toggle on/off the “Tethered Capture Window,” shown below.

The window indicates the name of the camera connected to your computer and the “Session Name” that you used when you set the “Tethered Capture Settings”; in this case I used the name “Studio Session.”

Click the button labeled ¹”Live” in order to see a “Live View” of your camera. With my camera tethered to an Apple MacBook Air (M1, 2020) — by far the fastest computer I own and one of the faster computers currently on the market — there is so much video lag that I found “Live” to be unusable!

You can adjust a limited number of camera settings, including shutter speed, aperture, ISO, and white balance (shown from left-to-right in the “Tethered Capture Window”).

“Develop Settings” can be applied on-the-fly to photos as you shoot them. I’m not sure how useful this feature is, given the fact that it seems like every photo requires a unique set of adjustments/edits.

Lastly, there is a shutter button that triggers the camera remotely.

To end the session, select File → Tethered Capture → Stop Tethered Capture.

What are the take-aways?

Essentially that’s all you can do using Adobe Lightroom Tethered Capture. As far as I can tell, there’s no way to autofocus the camera lens remotely. (Please correct me if I’m wrong.) That would be a nice feature to add. (Hint-hint, Adobe.)

In contrast, the Canon EOS Utility can do so much more I think it’s the tool of choice for tethered shooting with my Canon camera. Please stay tuned for my next blog post in which I will do a complete review of Canon EOS Utility 2, plus a few comments about Ver. 3.

Related Resource: Tethering just got better in Lightroom Classic CC, by Terry White (20:59). “Adobe Evangelist Terry White shows how to shoot tethered into Lightroom Classic CC with the enhancements released in the February 2019 update.” Source Credit: Show notes. Note: Mr. White refers to the refers to the “Tethered Capture Window” as “Tether/ing Bar.”

Copyright © 2021 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Swift River Cruiser exuvia (face-head)

November 20, 2020

The following image is a focus-stacked composite of three photos, focused on the left eye, right eye, and both eyes respectively.

27 May 2017 | Riverbend Park | Swift River Cruiser (exuvia, face-head)

Tech Tips

The dragonfly exuvia was photographed against a pure white background (255, 255, 255) using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique.

Several photos were taken using my Canon EOS 5D Mark II digital camera, a Kenko 12mm extension tube, and Laowa 25mm Ultra Macro Lens, set for f/4.0 (the sweet spot for this lens) at ~3.0x magnification.

Godox TT685C external flash was used to backlight the background (a piece of translucent white plastic) and a Godox TT685F external flash was used as a key light on the right side of the subject. The flash was triggered wirelessly by a Godox X2TC.

Check the EXIF/IPTC info for the photograph for complete details regarding photo gear and camera settings.

Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to create a focus-stacked composite image that was edited using Apple Aperture.

The Backstory

Swift River Cruiser dragonfly (Macromia illinoiensisexuvia was collected on 27 May 2017 along the Potomac River at Riverbend Park in Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female.

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

The best of both worlds at bargain prices

November 13, 2020

GyroVu” sells inexpensive adapter cables and power sources that enable continuous AC power for studio photography and long-lasting battery power for field photography.

After a month of exploration and experimentation with several gadgets similar to the GyroVu product line (see Related Resources at the end of this blog post), I strongly endorse GyroVu as the most flexible solution and best value for your money.

AC power

For Canon cameras that use a Canon LP-E6N battery, USB adapter cable only ($35.99)…

Product image courtesy B&H Photo.

For Canon, cable and power supply ($43.95)…

Product image courtesy B&H Photo.

AC power supply, compatible with adapter cables for both Canon and Fujifilm…

Product image courtesy B&H Photo.

Both GyroVu USB adapter cables featured in this blog post use the same AC power supply (MODEL: KeKe-F16C). I recommend buying a “cable with power supply” for one camera model, and “cable only” for other cameras you own.

For example, I bought a “Cable with Power Supply” for my Canon EOS 5D Mark II and a “Cable Only” for my Fujifilm X-T3.

For Fujifilm, USB adapter cable only ($29.95)…

Product image courtesy B&H Photo.

Battery power

Each GyroVu “dummy battery” adapter cable features a USB connector that can be used to connect your digital camera to an external power bank.

Product image courtesy AnkerDirect.

Related Resources

This blog post is one in a series of posts related to continuous AC power and long-lasting battery power for select Canon, Fujifilm, and Panasonic digital cameras.

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Continuous power: Canon EOS 5D Mark II

November 9, 2020

The Canon EOS 5D Mark II digital camera was released during November 2008. Yep, 2008 — that’s 12 years ago! Imagine my surprise when I discovered that some official Canon accessories for the camera are still available. For a premium price. More about that at the end of this blog post.

Two items are required in order to provide continuous power for the Canon EOS 5D Mark II.

1. Canon DC Coupler DR-E6 ($56.00)

Product image courtesy B&H Photo.

2. Canon AC Adapter AC-E6N ($88.00)

Product image courtesy Canon USA.

The AC Adapter is connected to an alternating current (AC) electricity outlet; the adapter converts AC power to direct current (DC). The DC Coupler connects to the AC Adapter (using the barrel connector end of the cables) and the “dummy battery” goes in the battery compartment of the camera, replacing the Canon LP-E6N Lithium-Ion Battery Pack (7.2V, 1865mAh) used by the Canon EOS 5D Mark II.

Tech Tips

  • The battery compartment door must be closed in order for the camera to power-on.
  • Be sure to disable auto power-off for the camera.
  • This continuous power rig should work with any Canon camera that uses a Canon LP-E6N battery. That being said, I haven’t tested it with other models of Canon cameras. “Trust but verify,” as Ronald Reagan said.

Related Resources

What are the take-aways?

The total cost for both items is $144.00. In my strong opinion, the Canon-brand power adapter is overpriced by a factor of nearly four times. In other words, you pay a premium price for the comfort of knowing the products will work safely with your camera.

I wasn’t happy spending a lot more money than I think the product is worth, but was willing to do so when I felt like I had no idea what I was doing. I wish I knew then what I know now — I could have saved a lot of money!

Are less expensive continuous power solutions available? In a word, yes. More later in a series of follow-up blog posts.

Post Update

I just discovered a new item is coming soon to B&H Photo: Bescor Canon Style ACE6N Power Supply and DR-E6 Coupler Kit ($69.99). That’s approximately half the price of the official Canon power accessory!

Related Resources

This blog post is one in a series of posts related to continuous AC power and long-lasting battery power for select Canon, Fujifilm, and Panasonic digital cameras.

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

When is close too close?

October 14, 2020

Swift River Cruiser dragonfly (Macromia illinoiensisexuvia was collected on 27 May 2017 along the Potomac River at Riverbend Park in Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female. The prominent horn on the head — a key field mark for exuviae from Family Macromiidae (Cruisers) — is noticeable in the following photo, although maybe not recognizable.

This photo is one of several test shots using “The Macroscope,” my nickname for the Laowa 25mm Ultra Macro Lens. The Laowa lens was mounted on my Canon 5D Mark II digital camera with a 12mm Kenko extension tube between the lens and camera body.

My new Laowa LED Ring Light was mounted on the front of the lens, powered by an Anker PowerCore+ 26800 PD 45W battery. The Laowa LED Ring Light was used to light the subject. A Sunpak LED-160 Video Light was used as a focusing aid. A Godox TT685C external flash was used to backlight a translucent white plastic background, using the “Meet Your Neighbours” technique. The flash was triggered wirelessly by a Godox X2TC.

The image is full-frame (5616 by 3744 pixels), that is, uncropped. The lens was set for f/4 (the “sweet spot” for the lens) at 4x magification. The camera was set for single point focus and spot metering, centered on the right eye of the exuvia.

Look closely at a full-size version of the image. At this magnification, the depth of field is very shallow: remnant ommatidia are clearly in focus; most of the image is out of focus.

In order to provide some context for what is shown in the first photo, the last photo shows the entire specimen. The photo gear used to take the shot is specified in a previous blog post.

When is close too close?

Close is too close when most of the subject is unrecognizable. At 4x magnification, it’s essential to use focus stacking to create a composite image.

The bigger take-away from this test shot is the Laowa LED Ring Light seems to work fairly well, albeit a sample size of one.

Related Resources

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Laowa LED Ring Light for 25mm Ultra Macro Lens

October 9, 2020

I prefer artificial light from electronic flash units rather than continuous light sources such as LEDs. That being said, when the working distance between lens and subject is small, a lens-mounted LED ring light makes sense to use.

Minimum focusing distance versus working distance

The “minimum focusing distance” is the distance from the subject to the focal plane. The “working distance” is the distance from the front of the lens to the subject. For macro photography, usually the latter is more important than the former.

According to Venus Optics (Laowa), the minimum focusing distance for the “Laowa 25mm f/2.8 2.5-5x Ultra Macro lens” is 23.4 cm at 2.5x magnification and 17.3 cm at 5x. According to several Web sites, the working distance is 45 mm (4.5 cm) at 2.5x and 40 mm (4.0 cm) at 5x, or a range of working distances from ~1.8 to ~1.6 inches.

Adding one or more extension tubes reduces the working distance and increases magnification. For example, adding a Kenko 12mm extension tube reduced the working distance from 45 mm to ~30 mm at 2.5x.

And it’s worth noting that adding the Laowa “Canon EF lens to Fujifilm X mount camera adapter” to the lens further reduces the working distance — the adapter is ~26 mm wide, essentially equivalent to adding a 26mm extension tube. Combined with the 1.5x crop factor of Fujifilm X-Series cameras such as the X-T1 and X-T3, it’s no wonder the magnification of the lens is increased dramatically when used with select Fujifilm cameras!

Ultra Macro Lens

The first two photos, courtesy B&H Photo, show the version of the Laowa lens for Canon EF. For what it’s worth, f/4 is the “sweet spot” for this lens.

Product image courtesy B&H Photo.

Look closely at the front of the lens. Notice a “flange” (one of two) that is visible around the outer rim of the lens. Those flanges are used to mount the Laowa LED ring light on the lens.

Product image courtesy B&H Photo.

LED Ring Light

The next two photos, courtesy Allen’s Camera, show the Laowa LED ring light.

Product image courtesy Allen’s Camera.

The LED ring light ships with a USB power cable. A power source for the ring light is NOT INCLUDED. My next blog post will feature a discussion of the pros/cons of the power source solution I decided to use.

Product image courtesy Allen’s Camera.

LED mounted on lens

The last photo shows the Laowa LED Ring Light mounted on the Laowa Ultra Macro Lens that is mounted on my Canon 5D Mark II digital camera. The USB power cable is connected to the LED ring light but not connected to a power source. (Don’t mind the clutter in the background!)

Notice the face of the LED ring light extends ~5 mm beyond the front of the lens, thereby reducing the working distance by ~5 mm (~0.5 cm). Plan accordingly.

Laowa LED and 25mm Ultra Macro lens mounted on Canon 5D Mark II.

Related Resources

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Neurocordulia yamaskanensis exuvia

April 13, 2020

A Stygian Shadowdragon dragonfly (Neurocordulia yamaskanensis) exuvia was collected by Freda van den Broek on 10 June 2019 along the St. Croix River in Interstate Park, Polk County, Wisconsin USA.

A two-step process was used to verify the genus and species of the exuvia.

  1. Determine the family.
  2. Determine the genus and species.

Step 1. Family

First, determine the family of the specimen. For reference, watch the excellent Vimeo video, Identifying dragonfly larva to family (8:06). Here’s the decision tree used to identify the exuvia as a member of the Family Corduliidae (Emeralds).

  • The specimen has a mask-like labium (prementum) that covers the face, as shown in Image No. 1, characteristic of four families of odonates: Cordulegastridae (Spiketails); Corduliidae (Emeralds); Libellulidae (Skimmers); and Macromiidae (Cruisers).
  • There is no horn on the face-head, characteristic of Macromiidae, so it’s not a cruiser.
  • Cordulegastridae has angular, jagged crenulations on its labium, so it’s not a spiketail. The crenulations for Corduliidae and Libellulidae can look similar.
  • Look at the anal pyramid to differentiate Corduliidae and Libellulidae: It’s probably Corduliidae if the cerci are at least half as long as the paraprocts. [Editor’s Note: It’s probably Libellulidae if the cerci are less than half the length of the paraprocts.]

In summary, the exuvia has a mask-like labium, and no horn on its face-head. The deeply-scalloped crenulations along the margins of the palpal lobes are a characteristic field mark for Genus Neurocordulia (Shadowdragons) in the Family Corduliidae (Emeralds), according to Kevin Hemeon, member of the “Odonate Larvae and Exuviae” Facebook group.

Although the anal pyramid isn’t shown clearly in any of the photos in this field guide, careful examination of photos of the teneral adult that emerged from the exuvia (see The Backstory, below) confirmed the dragonfly is a Stygian Shadowdragon. Stygian is the only species of Neurocordulia (Shadowdragons) within range of Wisconsin.

A face-head view of the exuvia is shown in Image No. 1, magnified approximately two and one-half times life size (~2.5x). Notice the mask-like labium that covers the face of the exuvia, including deeply-scalloped crenulations with bundles of bristles (setae) located along the margins of the palpal lobes.

No. 1 | Neurocordulia yamaskanensis | exuvia (face-head)

Step 2. Genus and species

Dichotomous keys from Identification Keys to Northeastern Anisoptera Larvae, compiled by Ken Soltesz, were used to verify the genus and species of the exuvia. Field marks that match this specimen are highlighted in boldface green text.

Key to the Genera of the Family Corduliidae, p. 28.

1a. Pair of small tubercles on top of head; Lateral lobe of labium with 4 or 5 setae (except sometimes 6 or 7 in Neurocordulia). (2)

2a. Strong lateral spines of abdominal segment 8 very divergent and as strong as parallel spines of [S]9. (Neurocordulia)

Alternate Key to the Genera of the Family Corduliidae, p. 29.

1a. Dorsal hooks present and well developed on some of the abdominal segments. (2)

2a. Lateral spines present on segment 8. (3)

3a. Crenulations on distal margin of labial palpi nearly semicircular or even more deeply cut; Lateral spines on segment 8 divergent. (Neurocordulia)

Key to the Species of the Genus Neurocordulia, p. 31.

1b. Lateral spines of 9 about 30 to 50 percent of the length of segment 9, not extending beyond the tips of the caudal appendages; Dorsal hooks of segments 7 to 9 reduced to scarcely more than a short ridge; Length 22 – 24.5 mm. (yamaskanensis)

The following annotated focus-stacked composite images illustrate key field marks described in Soltesz’s dichotomous keys.

Notice the specimen has stubby mid-dorsal hooks along the length of its abdomen, as shown in Image No. 2.

Lateral spines are present on abdominal segments eight and nine (S8-S9): the lateral spines on S8 are divergent; the ones on S9 are parallel.

The exuvia is ~2.4 cm (~0.95 in) in length — the longest shadowdragon larva/exuvia in the genus Neurocordulia. Notice the lateral spines on abdominal segment nine (S9) don’t extend beyond the tips of the caudal appendages (terminal appendages), as shown below.

The Backstory

The following narrative was provided by Freda van den Broeck.

On the last morning of the Wisconsin Dragonfly Society Annual Meeting weekend — Sunday, June 10th 2019 — I made my way to the boat landing in Interstate Park, St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin USA.

The previous morning I’d photographed Mustached Clubtail emerging there (with Alon Coppens). We also saw several teneral Rapids Clubtails. One didn’t have to look hard to find exuviae — they were most easily seen on the rocks, just a couple of feet above the water line. I was really hoping to find a Snaketail emerging, but had no such luck.

Photo of St. Croix river used with permission from Freda van den Broek.

Just as I was about to head back to the car, I spotted a teneral, that had crawled up the rock face higher than I would have expected. At that point, I thought it was “just another baskettail” — we’d seen many of them on Friday afternoon and Saturday. But it was pretty and shiny, so I had to take a few pictures, even though I was late for breakfast. (It was around 8:20 am.)

It was several days later before I realized that it wasn’t a baskettail, but a Shadowdragon, and that a few of the exuviae I’d collected there were Stygian Shadowdragons. Source Credit: Freda van den Broek.

Photo used with permission from Freda van den Broek.

Tenerals are usually tough to identify, but you’ll notice in both photos that the [small yellow] spot on [side of] the thorax is clearly visible. Source Credit: Freda van den Broek.

Photo used with permission from Freda van den Broek.

Related Resources

Odonate Exuviae – a hyperlinked list of identification guides to many species of odonate exuviae from seven families of dragonflies and three families of damselflies.

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

MYN – N. yamaskanensis exuvia (face-head)

April 10, 2020

The following annotated focus-stacked composite image shows a Stygian Shadowdragon dragonfly (Neurocordulia yamaskanensis) exuvia collected by Freda van den Broek on 10 June 2019 along the St. Croix River in Interstate Park, Polk County, Wisconsin USA.

10 JUN 2019 | Polk County, WI | Stygian Shadowdragon (exuvia)

Notice the unusual shape of the crenulations between the palpal lobes of its mask-like labium. Is this field mark unique to N. yamaskanensis or common to all species of the genus Neurocordulia (Shadowdragons)? Enquiring minds want to know!

Tech Tips

Laowa 25mm Ultra Macro lens, set for 2.5x magnification, and Canon EOS 5D Mark II DSPLR was used to photograph the subject against a pure white background (255, 255, 255) following the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique.

24 photos were used to create the composite image, including 23 photos taken using an aperture of f/5.6 and one photo taken at f/16.

If you look closely at the full-size version of the image, then you will notice some areas that indicate the final image is a few layers short of a perfect focus stack. But hey, not bad for a new lens and a manual focus rail that I used for the first time!

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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