Archive for the ‘Apple’ Category

Walking tour of CAHH parks

November 26, 2018

Hollin Hills is a development in Fairfax County, Virginia, about 10 miles outside of Washington, D.C. It has about 450 houses. It was designed by Charles Goodman and developed by Robert Davenport.” Source Credit: “Hollin Hills” website (no longer online).

The Civic Association of Hollin Hills (CAHH) owns and maintains seven small parks in the community: the Wildlife Sanctuary; Sutton Potter Park; Brickelmaier Park; Charles Goodman Park; Paul Spring Park; “Mac” McCalley Park; and Voigt Memorial Park.

All of the parks are located along streams except Sutton Potter Park and McCalley Park. The Wildlife Refuge/Sanctuary extends from Woodlawn Trail to the dogleg in the road at Boswell Avenue and Delafield Place. Two parks straddle creeks that are tributaries of Paul Spring, a stream that runs along Paul Spring Road: Brickelmaier Park runs from Popkins Lane to Paul Spring Road; Goodman Park runs from Marthas Road to Paul Spring Road. Paul Spring Park runs along Paul Spring from the intersection of Rebecca Drive and Paul Spring Road to the intersection of Rippon Road and Paul Spring Road, directly across the street from McCalley Park and Voigt Park. The upstream end of Paul Spring Park is near White Oaks Park, a mid-size park maintained by Fairfax County Park Authority.

Sutton Potter Park was featured in an article that appeared in Washingtonian Magazine, “Best of 2004: Sledding Hills.” I shot two photos from a viewpoint about halfway up the long hill: one looking downhill; another looking uphill. Trust me, neither photo provides a sense of the true steepness of the hillslope — a sled ride downhill could be either extremely exhilarating or very terrifying! The park entrance is located at the 7400 block of Range Road; another entrance is located behind the townhouses along Windbreak Drive.

The Wildlife Sanctuary is (or was) a good place to look for Mocha Emerald dragonflies (Somatochlora linearis). Peak activity was observed during July. A segment of Paul Spring, a stream located in Paul Spring Park, is (or was) good for Needham’s Skimmer dragonflies (Libellula needhami); the entire length of the stream is good for damselflies, including Ebony Jewelwing (Calopteryx maculata) and Variable Dancer (Argia fumipennis)/Violet Dancer (Argia fumipennis violacea).

The Backstory

During Fall 2010, I used my Apple iPhone 3G and an app called “EveryTrail” to create an interactive map showing the location of the entrances to the CAHH parks. At some point, I noticed the hyperlink to the interactive map stopped working.

As it turns out, ownership of “EveryTrail” transferred to “TripAdvisor” in 2011; EveryTrail was acquired by “AllTrails” in 2016.

All of the interactive trail maps that I created eight years ago survived two ownership transfers, much to my surprise! Some of the interactivity of the original maps was lost in translation, but hey, all is not lost. “Walking Tour of CAHH Parks” is the current iteration of the interactive map, available from AllTrails. See also “Walking Tour of Huntley Meadows Park (Ver. 2).”

Tech Tips

The “EveryTrail” app was used to record a GPX file that traces the route I walked.

Photos were shot at selected waypoints. All photos featured in both interactive trail maps were taken using the built-in camera of my Apple iPhone 3G; the photos were geotagged automatically by the iPhone’s GPS receiver.

Answer key, Raiders of the Lost Park

March 16, 2016

In Raiders of the Lost Park, a.k.a., “The Wall” — the last post in my photoblog — readers were challenged to guess the location in Huntley Meadows Park where the following photograph was taken.

Building ruins as viewed from an unknown location at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

11 March 2016 | Huntley Meadows Park | Building ruins

After shooting the preceding photograph, I used the Apple “Compass” app (free) for iPhone to determine my exact location. Tech Tip: Capture an image of the iPhone screen by pressing the “Home” and “Power” buttons simultaneously.

Next, open Google Maps in a Web browser; click on the button labeled “Earth” (lower-left corner of window). Enter the following text string (refer to the “Compass” app screen capture, shown above) in the field labeled “Search Google Maps”: 38 46 3 N 77 7 1 W. Press the “return” key; the following satellite image/map should appear.

Pretty cool, huh? Well, now you know my exact location when I photographed the “The Wall.” Notice the “Compass” app also shows I was facing south-southwest when the photo was taken. In other words, I was standing where the red pin appears on the map, facing toward the bottom, a little left of center (relative to the map).

Hiking Directions: From the parking lot at the head-end of the Hike-Bike Trail, walk uphill along S. Kings Hwy. Stop at at the BEGINNING of the guard rail. Look to the right (about 1:30 to 2 o’clock) and you can see the building ruins. Walk a straight line path between the beginning of the guard rail and the ruins; there are fewer thorny vines along this route than I encountered/suffered by following the directions given to me!

Tech Tip: Some of my fellow WordPress bloggers may be wondering, “How did you embed an interactive Google Map in this post?” WordPress “Support” is your friend: Support / Google Maps / Embedding a Google Map.

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Answer key, Where’s Waldo?

January 24, 2016

In Where’s Waldo? — the last post in my photoblog — readers were challenged to guess the location in Huntley Meadows Park where the following photograph was taken.

The "Mystery Pool" spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

14 JAN 2016 | Huntley Meadows Park | “Mystery Pool”

After shooting the preceding photograph, I used the Apple “Compass” app (free) for iPhone to determine my exact location. Tech Tip: Capture an image of the iPhone screen by pressing the “Home” and “Power” buttons simultaneously.

Next, open Google Maps in a Web browser; click on the button labeled “Earth” (lower-left corner of window). Enter the following text string (refer to the “Compass” app screen capture, shown above) in the field labeled “Search Google Maps”: 38 45 8 N 77 6 44 W. Press the “return” key; the following satellite image/map should appear.

Pretty cool, huh? Well, now you know my exact location when I photographed the “Mystery Pool.” Notice the “Compass” app also shows I was facing south-southwest when the photo was taken. In other words, I was standing where the red pin appears on the map, facing toward the bottom, a little left of center (relative to the map).

Tech Tip: Some of my fellow WordPress bloggers may be wondering, “How did you embed an interactive Google Map in this post?” WordPress “Support” is your friend: Support / Google Maps / Embedding a Google Map.

Copyright © 2016 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Eastern American Toads: mating season

April 14, 2013

The following YouTube video features several examples of the mating call of a male Eastern American Toad (Anaxyrus americanus) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. The video clips were recorded on a very windy day. Apple iMovie was used to edit the video: image stabilization was applied to all of the raw video clips; the audio waveforms were adjusted to decrease the wind noise and amplify the mating calls.

A mating pair of Eastern American Toads was spotted a few feet away from the male toad shown in the preceding video.

American Toads (mating pair) American Toads (mating pair)

Copyright © 2013 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Fairfax County Fire & Rescue boat

March 14, 2013

The Fairfax County Fire & Rescue boat located at Pohick Bay Regional Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

Fairfax County Fire & Rescue boat Fairfax County Fire & Rescue boat

Copyright © 2013 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

How to publish blog posts using a timer

January 13, 2011

It is possible to publish blog posts using the built-in timer in the WordPress for (Apple) iOS app. Try the following step-by-step instructions.

  1. Compose new blog post. Tap “Done.”
  2. Tap “Settings”; set timer (“Publish Date”). Tap “Write.”
  3. Tap “Publish.”

Possible uses include publishing blog posts at the same time every day (e.g., at the beginning of typical business hours), and at times when you are on travel.

Photo Gallery and Slideshow

April 13, 2010

This is a sample photo gallery …

… and this is a sample JavaScript slideshow:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Both the gallery and slideshow display properly in a Web browser on Apple mobile devices such as the iPod touch, iPhone, and iPad.


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