Archive for the ‘Panasonic DMC-FZ150’ Category

Cobra Clubtail versus Midland Clubtail

April 20, 2020

Odonate exuviae from two species in Genus GomphurusCobra Clubtail (Gomphurus vastus) and Midland Clubtail (Gomphurus fraternus) — are nearly perfect body doubles, with the exception of one key field mark that can be used to differentiate the species.

Dorsal views

Lateral spines are located on abdominal segments six through nine (S6-S9) for both species.

10 JUN 2019 | Barron County, WI | Midland Clubtail exuvia (dorsal)

Ventral views

The overall shape of the prementum is similar for both species.

10 JUN 2019 | Barron County, WI | Midland Clubtail exuvia (ventral)

Prementum (ventral view)

The shape of the palpal lobes on the prementum is different for the two species, as shown in the following diagram on p. 15, Key to the species of genus GomphurusIdentification Keys to Northeastern Anisoptera Larvae, compiled by Ken Soltesz.

The following images are magnified approximately three and one-half times life size (~3.5x).

For both species, focus on the row of teeth along the right palpal lobe. Notice the strongly curved shape of the palpal lobe for Cobra Clubtail (shown above), in contrast with the gently arched shape of the palpal lobe for Midland Clubtail (shown below). Also notice the Cobra palpal lobe has fewer teeth than Midland.

10 JUN 2019 | Barron County, WI | Gomphurus fraternus (exuvia)

Adults

Adult Cobra Clubtail dragonflies are almost identical to Midland Clubtails too. Several field marks can be used to differentiate the two species. In my opinion, one field mark is the easiest to recognize where it really matters — in the field!

16 MAY 2016 | Riverbend Park | Cobra Clubtail (adult male)

Notice there aren’t any mid-dorsal marks on abdominal segments eight and nine (S8-S9) for Cobra Clubtail (shown above). In contrast, there is a small yellow triangle on abdominal segment eight (S8) for Midland Clubtail (shown below). This is true for males and females of both species.

Photo used with permission from Freda van den Broek.

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Cross-compatibility of Godox TT685-series flashes

November 20, 2019

The following quick-and-dirty video is a demonstration of the cross-compatibily among Godox TT685-series external flash units, including a Godox TT685F, TT685o/p, and TT685C (shown from left-to-right). All three flash units were test-fired using Godox X2TF and X2To/p radio flash triggers.

Notice the brand of flash trigger used to fire the flashes appears in the lower-left corner of the LCD on each flash. The beginning of the video shows all three flash units had been fired by a Godox X2TF (for Fujifilm) set for TTL mode. Think about that — now the TT685o/p (center) and TT685C (right) “think” and operate like the Fujifilm-compatible flash (left). Incredible!

Next I switched to a Godox X2To/p (for Olympus and Panasonic), changed the mode to Manual (M), and test-fired the flashes.

Take-aways

The cross-compability of Godox TT685-series flashes makes these relatively inexpensive, well-made flashes an even better value. By buying wisely it’s possible to assemble an array of flashes that provides maximum flexibility. Bravo, Godox!

Editor’s Commentary

You know, I actually had a vision of how I wanted this video to turn out before I started shooting. Let’s just say my vision wasn’t realized. I like to think I’m a fairly good photographer; videographer, not so much. Perhaps I’ll re-do the video when I’m not as pressed for time as I was for this iteration.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Old business. New business.

November 18, 2019

The following quick-and-dirty photograph shows an array of gear used for off-camera flash photography, including a Canon 580EX II Speedlite, Godox X1R-C radio receiver for Canon, Godox X2TF radio transmitter, and Godox X2To/p radio transmitter. This photo will be used to illustrate some old- and new business.

An array of gear used for off-camera flash photography.

Old business

In my last blog post, entitled Pass-through hot shoe, I wrote…

…the Canon macro flash is compatible with Panasonic bridge cameras with one caveat: TTL is incompatible, so it’s manual mode flash only.

Look closely at the Godox X2T-series of radio flash triggers shown in the lower-half of the preceding photo. Notice the pass-through hot shoe on top of both units features one pin — the power pin. Therefore the X2Tx units can be used to trigger a flash mounted on the pass-through hot shoe but no other communication is possible between the camera, X2Tx, and shoe-mounted flash.

When a Canon flash is mounted directly on the hot shoe of one of my Panasonic superzoom bridge cameras, or one of my Fujifilm X-series cameras, the center power pin on the flash and contact on the camera are aligned so the flash can be triggered in manual mode. The other pins on a Canon flash might touch some of the contacts on the cameras, but the pins/contacts aren’t used for the same purpose from one brand to another so they don’t work. As a result, flash features like TTL and high-speed sync might not work. Essentially, it’s as if the camera hot shoe has only one pin — the center power pin.

Related Resource: Answering Your Godox X1T Questions, by alex silva photography (7:10). Ignore the fact that this video was made for the Godox X1T-series radio flash triggers — the X1T and X2T are essentially the same. Fast-forward to 3:03/7:10 for a segment related to mounting a flash on the pass-through hot shoe; the segment ends at 4:00/7:10.

New business (What’s old is new.)

The first two external flash units that I bought are Canon Speedlites, including the Canon 580EX and Canon 580EX II. Neither flash unit is radio-capable — they can be used off-camera but it’s optical master and optical slave mode only for these two flashes. Both Canon flashes cost ~$500 each when new. Although I bought the flash units lightly-used, they hadn’t depreciated much, and as a result, I paid several hundred dollars for each one.

During the past year-or-so, I switched to the Godox TT685-series of external flash units. Not only does each Godox flash cost approximately one-fifth the MSRP for current Canon flashes, the Godox units are radio-capable.

Mounting my Canon 580EX II Speedlite on a Godox X1R-C radio receiver converts the Canon flash to a radio-controlled flash unit that works like any Godox TT685-series flash. Interfaced with an X1R-C, the Canon can be set and triggered remotely by radio from both the Godox X2T-series and XPro-series radio flash triggers, or even another Godox TT685-series flash set for master mode.

The Canon 580EX II — the newer model of my Canon flashes — is fully-compatible with the Godox X1R-C; the older Canon 580EX is incompatible.

For $40 — less than half the cost of a new Godox flash — I was able to repurpose one of my old, reliable Canon flashes. How cool is that? Very cool!

Related Resource: Godox XPro TTL Flash Trigger [REVIEW], by steeletraining (10:53). This video covers three points that might be of interest to readers of my blog.

  • Godox X1R-C receiver (enables use of newer Canon flashes with Godox system)
  • cross-brand compatibility among Godox flashes and radio flash triggers
  • TCM Function, Godox XPro-series radio flash triggers

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Pass-through hot shoe

November 15, 2019

The Godox X2To/p radio flash trigger has a slightly lower price point than the Godox XProO/P, smaller footprint, and a pass-through hot-shoe. Perhaps you’re wondering, “Who needs a pass-through hot shoe?” You do. Well, you might, for some applications.

The following photos show a Godox X2To/p mounted on my Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ300 24x superzoom bridge camera; the Canon MT-26EX-RT Macro Twin Lite is mounted on the pass-through hot shoe on top of the X2To/p. The same set-up works with my Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150 24x superzoom bridge camera.

Macro flash kit for Panasonic Lumix 24x superzoom digital cameras.

As I mentioned in my last blog post, the Canon macro flash is compatible with Panasonic bridge cameras with one caveat: TTL is incompatible, so it’s manual mode flash only.

Macro flash kit for Panasonic Lumix 24x superzoom digital cameras.

The beauty of adding the Godox X2To/p to the rig is it can wirelessly trigger multiple off-camera flash units via a radio signal. During limited testing, I discovered the X2To/p can be set for either TTL- or Manual modes; for consistency, I use Manual mode for all the flashes including the Canon macro flash.

Take-aways

Although this rig is well-suited for studio applications, I’m guessing it isn’t as good for field work. That being said, I have never used a multi-flash setup in the field.

Full disclosure

The radio flash trigger shown in the preceding photos is actually a Godox X2TF for Fujifilm cameras. The two brands of Godox radio flash triggers are virtually identical except for the label on top of each unit.

I needed the Godox X2To/p for use with my Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150 24x superzoom bridge camera in order to control two off-camera Godox flashes that were used to light the scene in both photos shown above. Both external flash units were set for Radio Slave mode.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Macro flash for Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150/300

November 13, 2019

You might be familiar with the old proverb that begins “For want of a nail, the shoe was lost.” Updating the poem, I might say “For want of a step-up ring, the macro flash was lost.” Until recently, that is, when a $7 part solved a long-standing problem.

Both of my “go-to” cameras for photowalking — including the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150 24x superzoom bridge camera, and the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ300 24x superzoom bridge camera — feature excellent capability for macro photography. Set for “Wide Macro,” both cameras have a focus range from 1 cm (0.39 in) to infinity.

Problem is, at a working distance of 1 cm from the subject, “lens shadow” is a problem using the built-in pop-up flash. What’s the solution? Add an external macro flash unit such as the Canon MT-26EX-RT Macro Twin Lite.

Front of macro flash rig

The lens on the DMC-FZ150 and DMC-FZ300 has the same size filter thread (52mm), so both cameras can use many of the same accessories. I used a new Sensei PRO 52-58mm Aluminum Step-Up Ring to adapt an old Canon Macrolite Adapter 58C (58mm) to the camera lens.

The Flash Unit Mount Ring (round holder for the twin flashes) clips onto a flange around the Canon Macrolite Adapter 58C; the Contol Unit is mounted on the camera hot shoe.

It’s worth noting there is a Canon Macrolite Adapter 52C (52mm) available for ~$14 MSRP. Since I already had a 58C for one of my Fujinon lenses, I decided to buy a step-up ring and save $7.

Macro flash kit for Panasonic Lumix 24x superzoom digital cameras.

For more magnification, a Raynox DCR-250 close-up filter can be mounted to the 58mm filter thread on the front of the Canon MT-26EX-RT Flash Unit Mount Ring using two adapter rings: a Sensei 58-52mm step-down ring; and a Sensei 52-43mm step-down ring.

The same combination of adapter rings can be used to mount the Raynox close-up filter on any lens to which the MT-26EX-RT Flash Unit Mount Ring is attached.

Back of macro flash rig

Macro flash kit for Panasonic Lumix 24x superzoom digital cameras.

Demystifying step-up and step-down rings

Here’s how to decode the numbers that appear around the rim of either a step-down or step-up ring. Let’s say we’d like to connect a Canon Macrolite Adapter 58C to the lens of a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ300.

The Macrolite Adapter has a filter thread diameter of 58mm; the DMC-FZ300 lens has a filter thread diameter of 52mm. We need a 52-58mm step-up ring, because we’re going to step up from a smaller- to a larger filter thread diameter. Make sense? Hope so!

How/why a Canon flash works with a Panasonic camera

The following annotated image shows the pin configuration on the hot shoe for the Fujifilm EF-X500 external flash unit. Notice that the hot shoe has four-pins: the “center pin” is used for power; the other three pins are used for proprietary communication between the camera and flash unit, such as TTL.

Copyright © 2019 ReviewThree.com and B&H Photo. All rights reserved.

The pin configuration for other brands of external flash units varies by manufacturer, but most flashes use the center pin for power.

For example, all Canon external flash units (including the MT-26EX-RT Macro Twin Lite) have a five-pin hot shoe; the center pin is used for power and it’s aligned perfectly with the power pin on Panasonic bridge cameras. Therefore any current model of Canon flash is compatible with Panasonic bridge cameras with one caveat: TTL is incompatible, so it’s manual mode flash only. That’s not a problem since I prefer manual exposure for macro photography.

High-speed sync is also incompatible, but that’s a non-issue since Panasonic superzoom bridge cameras feature a leaf shutter in the lens rather than a focal plane shutter in the camera body. As a result, there is no camera “sync speed” so the flash will work properly using any shutter speed supported by the camera.

Related Resources

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Autumn Meadowhawk is a fall species

November 11, 2019

Autumn Meadowhawk (Sympetrum vicinum) is classified as a fall species of odonate. This blog post features two of many Autumn Meadowhawks that were spotted during a photowalk along the boardwalk in the central wetland area at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

The first individual is a male, as indicated by his terminal appendages. He is perched on a Swamp Rose (Rosa palustris) leaf. Nothing says “fall” like this little red devil against a background of fiery foliage!

The last individual is a male, perched on a cattail (Typha sp.) leaf near Swamp Rose and buttonbush (Cephalanthus sp.). The brown globes are the fruit of buttonbush.

The Backstory

My collection of field notes includes two text files that list lots of photos of both Blue-faced Meadowhawk (S. ambiguum) and Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies that were never published in my photoblog.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Blue-faced Meadowhawk (young male)

November 8, 2019

A Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum) was spotted near a vernal pool in the forest at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

This individual is a young male, as indicated by the red pruinescence that partially covers his yellow-orange and black abdomen, plus his terminal appendages.

20 SEP 2013 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (young male)

Regular readers of my photoblog know I’m fond of head-tilts in which the dragonfly seems to display some of its personality, especially when the individual is looking at me (below).

20 SEP 2013 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (young male)

Left, right, left. I followed this guy from perch to perch for several minutes.

20 SEP 2013 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (young male)

The Backstory

My collection of field notes includes two text files that list lots of photos of both Blue-faced Meadowhawk and Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies (S. vicinum) that were never published in my photoblog. Most of the photos were taken during Fall 2013 when one of many vernal pools at Huntley Meadows Park was near peak diversity for odonate species that inhabited the pool. Sadly, those days are long gone!

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Detente

October 30, 2019

Two Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum vicinum) were spotted perched side-by-side on the boardwalk in the central wetland area at Huntley Meadows Park (HMP), Fairfax County, Virginia USA. Both individuals are males, as indicated by their coloration and terminal appendages.

15 NOV 2013 | HMP | Autumn Meadowhawk (males)

Male dragonflies of the same species are natural rivals, competing for the attention of females that are willing to mate. Like many, if not most other species of dragonflies, male Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies stake out a “territory” near prime spots for females to lay eggs (oviposition); unlike many, if not most other species, male Autumn Meadowhawks don’t seem to defend their territory aggressively.

15 NOV 2013 | HMP | Autumn Meadowhawk (males)

Notice the male shown on the upper-left is using his front legs like windshield wipers to clean his eyes and face. Hey, he wants to look well-groomed for the ladies!

Related Resources

The Backstory

My collection of field notes includes two text files that list lots of photos of both Blue-faced Meadowhawk and Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies (S. vicinum) that were never published in my photoblog. Most of the photos were taken during Fall 2013 when one of many vernal pools at Huntley Meadows Park was near peak diversity for odonate species that inhabited the pool. Sadly, those days are long gone!

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Are adult Autumn Meadowhawks arboreal?

October 25, 2019

Autumn Meadowhawk (Sympetrum vicinum) is classified as a fall species of odonate. In the mid-Atlantic United States, meadowhawks seem to disappear for several months after they emerge during early to mid-summer and reappear during fall. Where do they go? No one knows for sure. I speculate Autumn Meadowhawk is an arboreal species of dragonfly that returns to the ground/water when it’s time to mate.

Emergence

The first individual — photographed soon after emergence — is a/an teneral/immature male, as indicated by the tenuous appearance of his wings, coloration, and terminal appendages.

24 JUN 2016 | HMP | Autumn Meadowhawk (teneral/immature male)

The next individual is a/an teneral/immature female, as indicated by the tenuous appearance of her wings, coloration, and terminal appendages.

24 JUN 2016 | HMP | Autumn Meadowhawk (teneral/immature female)

Time to mate

Fall is the time to mate for mature adult Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies (S. vicinum), as you can see in the following photo.

15 NOV 2013 | HMP | Autumn Meadowhawk (mating pair, “in wheel”)

This mating pair is “in wheel”: the male is on the upper-left; the female is on the lower-right. All dragonflies and damselflies have a 10-segmented abdomen, numbered from front to back: male dragonfly secondary genitalia, called hamules, are located in segments two and three (S2 and S3); female genitalia in segment eight (S8). Dragonflies form the mating wheel in order for their genitalia to connect during copulation.

Forest Canopy Walk at Vermont Institute of Natural Science

Observing dragonflies at the Earth’s surface is fairly easy; observing dragonflies at the treetops, not so much. The new Forest Canopy Walk at the Vermont Institute of Natural Science (VINS) should facilitate the latter.

During 2020, I hope to collaborate with Kelly Stettner, Black River Action Team (BRAT), and Anna Morris, Lead Environmental Educator, VINS, to gather evidence that supports my speculation that adult meadowhawk dragonflies are arboreal. Field observations will be collected on the ground and along the Forest Canopy Walk.

Hosted by Anna Morris, Kelly Stettner and her family scouted the VINS site on 05 October 2019, including the new Forest Canopy Walk and nearby water bodies that provide suitable habitat for Autumn Meadowhawk. Special thanks to Anna for providing a behind the scenes tour a week before the official opening of the Forest Canopy Walk.

Gallery photos used with permission from Kelly Stettner, BRAT.

A week later, Autumn Meadowhawk was observed along the Forest Canopy Walk for the first time. The following photos provide circumstantial evidence that we might be on the right track. I love it when a plan comes together!

Gallery photos used with permission from Anna Morris, VINS.

I’m happy to share that during our public Forest Canopy Walk opening today [12 October 2019], I was stationed at the Eagle platform and got to see two (2) meadowhawks zooming around, then perched on the railing (pictures attached)! This is about 60 feet up, near a Sugar Maple and a Red Oak. [More meadowhawks were seen] the next day at nearly 90 feet up! At this height and as it was so sunny there were at least four individuals zooming around, landing on visitors, etc. Source Credit: Anna Morris, Lead Environmental Educator, VINS.

Related Resources

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Panasonic DMC-FZ300 macro kit

October 14, 2019

The last two posts in my photoblog feature sample photos taken using a small, lightweight camera kit for macro photography that I’m more likely to carry in the field than any of my larger, heavier “studio” macro camera kits.

The macro rig features the following gear: Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ300 24x superzoom digital camera; Raynox DCR-250 close-up filter; and Godox X2To/p wireless flash trigger for Olympus and Panasonic. The Raynox close-up filter screws onto the front of the camera lens using a 52-43mm step-down ring.

Raynox DCR-250 not mounted on the camera lens.

The Godox flash trigger is optional. The Raynox DCR-250 close-up filter comes with its own lens cap. The lens hood can be mounted on the lens barrel when the close-up filter is mounted on the camera lens.

Raynox DCR-250 shown mounted on the camera lens.

It’s amazing how adding a relatively inexpensive close-up filter to the camera makes such a big difference in its capability.

Related Resource: Panasonic Bridge Cameras – Basic Photography Part 4, Close Up & Macro, by Graham Houghton (23:35).

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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