Archive for the ‘Apple Preview’ Category

GoPro: “Quik for Desktop”

May 24, 2022

GoPro legacy software “Quik for Desktop” (Ver. 2.7.0) can be used to add “Stickers” to video shot with a GoPro HERO5, 6, and 7, but doesn’t work with GoPro HERO8, 9, and 10. “Can be,” that is assuming the feature works with your camera/video. Huh? Please continue reading.

“Quik for Desktop”

My former colleague Kyle Margenau sent a video clip to me that he shot using his GoPro HERO5 Black action camera.

GoPro “Quik for Desktop” | Media

In order to edit a video, double-click on its icon in the Media library.

Editor’s Note: DO NOT click on “Open in Create Mode,” shown along the blue bar near the top of the screen — otherwise “you’re entering a world of pain!” “Create Mode” seems to be GoPro’s quick-and-dirty process for creating simple videos with added music for the purpose of sharing on social media. I tested the process so you don’t have to be frustrated — “Create Mode” was an epic fail!

There are four buttons for editing video, located along the lower-middle of the window. Shown from left-to-right, the four icons are “Create a Clip,” “Rotate 90°,” “Grab a Photo,” and “Adjust Gauges.”

GoPro “Quik for Desktop” | “Adjust Gauges” button

When I clicked the “Adjust Gauges” button (shown above, highlighted by a red square), the following error message appeared on-screen.

GoPro “Quik for Desktop” | No GPS Data

There are/were six “Stickers” available in “Quik for Desktop,” and they are somewhat different from the seven “Stickers” available in the “Quik” app (Ver. 10.15). Using “Quik for Desktop,” you can add as many stickers as you like; using the “Quik” app, you can add four stickers.

  • GoPro Logo
  • Info Cluster
  • Speed Tracker
  • GPS Path ← line with no context
  • Speedometer ← better than the version in “Quik” app
  • G-Force

I think it would be nice to include the exact latitude and longitude of the camera in the “Info Cluster.”

“Quik” app

The following JPG frame grab (2 MP) was saved from the “GoPro Quik” app (Ver. 10.15) running on my Apple iPad mini 6. Kyle’s vehicle is heading southeast at 17 mph.

Notice I juxtaposed the “Path” gauge (upper-left) with the “Terrain” gauge (lower-left) in order to underscore a point that I made in my last blog post — a line without any context/frame of reference is pointless.

GoPro “Quik” app.

As you can see by the telemetry “Stickers” shown in the preceding frame grab, Kyle’s video does in fact include GPS data. It’s worth noting the frame grab (shown above) does include EXIF but does not include GPS info for latitude, longitude, and elevation. C’mon GoPro — frame grabs from video could, and should include GPS info!

If you can determine the exact time of each video frame, you can use the exiftool -geotag and -geosync options to read the GPX file and geotag the extracted frames. Source Credit: ExifTool Forum.

I have NO IDEA why the “Adjust Gauges” feature in “Quik for Desktop” doesn’t work. I tested “Quik for Desktop” running on an older Apple iMac desktop computer (Intel) as well as a newer Apple MacBook Air (M1) — the “Adjust Gauges” feature didn’t work on either device.

I have watched several tutorial videos on YouTube that show the feature does work, or at least it did at one time.

Please contact me if you have any suggestions for troubleshooting this problem. Thanks!

Copyright © 2022 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

 

GoPro: How to add “Stickers”

May 20, 2022

Every GoPro action camera since the GoPro HERO5 Black features a built-in global positioning system (GPS) receiver; my GoPro HERO4 Black does not.

Assuming you own a GPS-capable GoPro camera, there is another case for using either “Quik for Desktop” or the “GoPro Quik” app to edit video: adding overlays to video, including stickers and telemetry gauges.

GoPro legacy software “Quik for Desktop” can be used to add “Stickers” to video shot with a GoPro HERO5, 6, and 7, but doesn’t work with GoPro HERO8, 9, and 10.

The “GoPro Quik” app can be used to add “Stickers” to video shot with HERO8, 9, and 10 cameras; it’s also backward-compatible with HERO5, 6, and 7.

It’s worth noting that the “GoPro Quik” app can be used to edit a single video clip for free, with some limitations. For details see GoPro Quik: Free Vs. Subscription Features. See also GoPro Quik App- All Your Questions Answered by Jordan Hetrick (12:33).

Add “Stickers”

My good friend and former colleague Kyle Margenau sent a video clip to me that he shot using his GoPro HERO8 Black. First the video clip was saved to “Photos” on my iPad mini 6, then it was added to “Media” in the “GoPro Quik” app.

Tap the “Media” icon (shown below, highlighted by a red square) to see “All Media” saved to the “GoPro Quik” app. Kyle’s video appears at the top of the list on the page, last saved on Friday, May 13 [2022].

GoPro “Quik” app | All Media

As you can see, I already edited the video to add several “Stickers.” Tap the pencil icon (shown below, highlighted by a red square) to edit the video.

GoPro “Quik” app.

Tap the “Stickers” button (shown below, highlighted by a red square).

GoPro “Quik” app.

Up to four stickers can be displayed on the video, one in each corner.

There are currently 7 stickers available in the app:

  1. GoPro Logo
  2. Speedometer ← speed plus compass heading
  3. Terrain ← unavailable in “Quik for Desktop”
  4. Path ← line with no context
  5. Speed Chart
  6. Altitude
  7. G-Force

Source Credit: GoPro Quik: How To View Stickers.

In the following screenshot notice that blue tick marks indicate the “Stickers” that have been added to the movie.

GoPro “Quik” app | Stickers

Add more “Stickers” by tapping one of the icons (shown above, highlighted by a red rectangle). By default, the new sticker will be shown in the upper-left corner of the movie. Tap the same icon again in order to reposition the sticker to the upper-right corner. Tap the same icon again to move the sticker to the lower-right corner; tap it a fourth time to move it to the lower-left corner. Tap the same sticker icon five times in order to delete it from the movie.

Tap the ✔️ icon (lower-right corner) when you are finished (shown above, highlighted by a red square).

Save Media

Wait, you need to do one more thing. Tap the “Save” icon (shown below, highlighted by a red square) in the upper-right corner in order to save your edited video.

GoPro “Quik” app.

The following screenshot shows where the video can be saved. There are three (3) options; I recommend “Save to Photos” (shown below, highlighted by a red rectangle).

GoPro “Quik” app.

Grab Photo

Play the annotated video clip and when you see a frame you’d like to grab, pause playback and tap the “Extract Photo Icon” located along the bottom of the screen (shown below, highlighted by a red square). For more detailed directions, see GoPro: How to “Grab Photo” from Video.

GoPro “Quik” app.

You have the option to scrub through the video frame-by-frame (by using the left and right arrows) until you find a frame that you’d like to save as a photo. Tap the blue “Save Frame” button located in the upper-right corner of the “Grab Photo” screen (shown below, highlighted by a red rectangle). Then choose the location where you would like to save the frame grab: Save to App; Save to Photos; Share Media.

GoPro “Quik” app | Grab Photo

The following video frame grab (4 MP) was saved from the “GoPro-Quik” app. Kyle’s vehicle is heading southeast at 22 mph.

GoPro “Quik” app.

The last screenshot was taken from the video using the Apple “Photos” app. Notice the black bars along the top and bottom of the screen. Kyle’s vehicle is heading southeast at 12 mph.

Apple “Photos” app.

What are the take-aways?

Could the GoPro Logo “Sticker” be any bigger? It’s ridiculously big! It shouldn’t be too difficult to update the “GoPro Quik” app to enable the user to resize/reposition “Stickers,” similar to the way it works in “Quik for Desktop.”

In my opinion, the Speedometer and Terrain “Stickers” are two of the more useful telemetry gauges.

It would be nice to add numbers to the tick marks on the Speedometer. In this case, the Speedometer is marked in increments of 10 mph, but the increment varies depending upon what is shown in your movie. Also, it would be nice to show an exact number for compass direction, from 0-360°.

The Terrain “Sticker” shows the path of the camera superimposed on a map. It would be nice to have the option to select the map type, such as street, terrain, or satellite. In contrast, the Path “Sticker” is simply a line that traces, well, the path of your camera. In my opinion, a line without any context/frame of reference is pointless, but hey, use the Path “Sticker” if you like.

Related Resources

Copyright © 2022 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

GoPro: How to “Grab Photo” from Video

May 17, 2022

When you use either the “GoPro app” or “GoPro Quik” app to remotely control your camera, you can save still photos from a video clip. For example, here’s how it works using “GoPro Quik” on my Apple iPad mini 6.

The first screen capture shows the “splash page” for GoPro Quik, running on my iPad mini 6. Tap the camera icon labeled “GoPro” located in the lower-right corner of the screen. The button works, despite the fact that it’s grayed out.

GoPro “Quik” app splash screen.

Next, tap the button labeled “Control Your GoPro” on the “Cameras” page.

“Cameras” screen, GoPro “Quik” app.

Tap the “Media Icon” located in the lower-right corner of the Live View screen (shown below, highlighted by a red square) in order to see photos and videos that you have recorded using your GoPro camera.

Live View, GoPro “Quik” app.

When you play a video clip shot with the camera and see a frame you’d like to grab, pause playback and tap the “Extract Photo Icon” located in the lower-middle of the screen (shown below, highlighted by a red square).

Video playback, GoPro “Quik” app.

You have the option to scrub through the video frame-by-frame (by using the left and right arrows) until you find a frame that you’d like to save as a photo. Then tap the blue “Save Frame” button located in the upper-right corner of the “Grab Photo” screen.

“Grab Photo” screen, GoPro “Quik” app.

Choose the location where you would like to save the frame grab.

Select “Save to …” location, GoPro “Quik” app.

The frame grab is saved as an 8 MB JPG file, smaller than the 12 MB JPGs created when the camera is set for “Photo Mode.”

The file can be adjusted using your photo editor of choice, but there’s a limit to what you can do during post-processing of JPGs so it’s always a good idea to “get it right” in-camera.

Related Resources

Copyright © 2022 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

GoPro time lapse submodes

May 3, 2022

The GoPro HERO4 Black action camera features three ways to either create (in-camera) a simple, time lapse movie in MP4 format or shoot a time series of photos (JPGs) that can be used to create a time lapse movie during post-processing.

Video Mode

“Time Lapse Video” submode

“Time Lapse Video” is one of several submodes under “Video Mode,” as shown below. It’s the simplest way to create a time lapse movie using the HERO4 Black.

GoPro “Quik” app.

There are two user-selectable settings in the “Time Lapse Video” submode (shown below, highlighted by a green rectangle): Interval; and Resolution. I selected an interval of 1 second and a resolution of 4K at 30 frames per sec (fps).

Settings, “GoPro app” (v7.1)

The preceding screen capture from the “GoPro app” (v7.1) seems to suggest there are many more user-selectable settings in “Time Lapse Video” submode; there aren’t. Call it an artifact of lazy app coding. I call it confusing! For reference, see p. 20 in the GoPro HERO4 Black User Manual (shown below).

GoPro HERO4 Black | User Manual

When the GoPro HERO4 Black is set for “Time Lapse Video” submode, the camera records MP4 videos with a 16:9 aspect ratio (3,840 x 2,160 pixels). File size varies depending upon the duration of the video clips.

Try it. I think you’ll like it. Make the same settings that I used and start recording. Just be sure to record long enough to create a “Goldilocks movie,” that is one that isn’t too short and isn’t too long but is just right.

Standard video playback is typically 30 frames per sec in the USA. If you record every second for 30 seconds, your final movie will be 1 second long! Plan to record for at least 10 to 15 minutes.

Based upon my settings the camera created two video clips: the first is 17 seconds in duration; the last is 28 seconds. That’s a total of 45 seconds long, before I trimmed the video clips using Apple iMovie. In order to smooth the playback and lengthen the final movie a little, I used iMovie to adjust the playback speed to 25% of normal.

Multi-Shot Mode

“Time Lapse” and “Night Lapse Photo” submodes enable automated recording of photos that can be used to create a time lapse movie during post-processing.

GoPro HERO4 Black | User Manual

The two submodes are similar, with one key difference: both Interval and Shutter Speed are user-selectable in “Night Lapse Photo” submode; only Interval is user-selectable in “Time Lapse” submode. A wide range of other user-selectable settings are available in both submodes, including “Protune.”

GoPro HERO4 Black | User Manual

“Time Lapse” submode

Untested, so far. Please stay tuned.

GoPro “Quik” app.

“Night Lapse Photo” submode

GoPro “Quik” app.

I tested “Night Lapse Photo” submode on the same day I created the time lapse movie featured in my last blog post. In case you’re wondering why I used “Night Lapse Photo” to record a scene during the day, I did so based upon the camera settings recommended by a well-known time lapse photographer/videographer.

27 APR 2022 | 3:47 pm | DCIM100GOPROG0020165

168 JPG photos were recorded during a 14 minute time period starting at 3:47 pm and stopping at 4:01 pm.

27 APR 2022 | 4:01 pm | DCIM100GOPROG0020332

As you can see in the two sample photos (shown above), the sky was overexposed in all of the photos that were recorded. The Interval was set for five (5) seconds and set the Shutter Speed was set for Auto. Those settings might work for Mr. X but they didn’t work for me!

The GoPro HERO4 Black records JPG photos with a 4:3 aspect ratio (4,000 x 3,000 pixels). Each photo file is approximately 2.2 MB in size.

The GoPro HERO4 Black features a fixed lens with an aperture of f/2.8.

The 35mm equivalent focal length of the lens is 15mm. That’s a fairly wide angle lens, so it’s no wonder the preceding photos show some “fish eye” distortion.

Notice the Shutter Speed was 1/120 second. Although 1/120 s is a relatively slow shutter speed, it’s fast enough that it might not explain why my photos are overexposed.

The scene I recorded was relatively high contrast — it was dark in the parking garage and the white clouds in the sky were bright. It’s possible the “Center Weighted Average” Metering Mode was unable to expose the entire image properly.

I didn’t know that Photo Mode / Night Photo submode and Multi-Shot Mode / Night Lapse Photo submode are virtually identical. Next time I experiment with “Night Lapse Photo” I will shoot some test shots using “Night Photo” to be sure the exposure is set correctly before starting “Night Lapse Photo.”

That being said, I think my next experiment will test “Time Lapse” submode.

Copyright © 2022 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

GoProbe

April 12, 2022

The more I explore creative ways to use my GoPro HERO4 Black action camera, I realize there’s a lot I don’t know about the camera hardware, firmware, and “supporting” software.

A lot of the frustration and pain of being a GoPro user is inflicted by GoPro Inc. If I knew what I know now BEFORE I decided to buy a GoPro camera, I’m almost 100% certain I wouldn’t have gotten one. Long story short (and it is a long story), all I want to do is make the most of my regrettable decision.

Should you edit photos and videos using GoPro apps?

Before I went on “hiatus” last week (more about that another time), I had promised to do a post (or series of posts) related to how to edit photos and videos from a GoPro camera.

My next blog post will focus on how to edit photos and videos from your GoPro action camera. Source credit: More settings: GoPro HERO4 Black.

And as I mentioned in a GoPro related blog post a few weeks ago …

I plan to publish a series of follow-up posts. Tentative topics include how to update the camera’s firmware, how to edit video using the GoPro “Quik” app (sneak preview: don’t go there!), how to use your GoPro as a Webcam, as well as a few other suggested applications to get you started using your action camera. Source credit: GoProse.

I DO NOT recommend using the suite of GoPro apps to edit your photos and videos! That is, unless you like the subscription model for “buying” software. I don’t, especially when there are free alternatives.

Suite of GoPro apps on my Apple iPad mini 6.

Grab Photo

There is one noteworthy exception. When you use either the “GoPro app” or “GoPro Quik” app to remotely control your camera, you can save still photos from a video clip. For example, here’s how it works using “GoPro Quik” on my Apple iPad mini 6.

The first screen capture shows the “splash page” for GoPro Quik, running on my iPad mini 6. Tap the camera icon labeled “GoPro” located in the lower-right corner of the screen. The button works, despite the fact that it’s grayed out.

GoPro “Quik” app splash screen.

Next, tap the button labeled “Control Your GoPro” on the “Cameras” page.

“Cameras” screen, GoPro “Quik” app.

Tap the “Media Icon” located in the lower-right corner of the Live View screen (shown below, highlighted by a red square) in order to see photos and videos that you have recorded using your GoPro camera.

Live View, GoPro “Quik” app.

When you play a video clip shot with the camera and see a frame you’d like to grab, pause playback and tap the “Extract Photo Icon” located in the lower-middle of the screen (shown below, highlighted by a red square).

Video playback, GoPro “Quik” app.

You have the option to scrub through the video frame-by-frame (by using the left and right arrows) until you find a frame that you’d like to save as a photo. Then tap the blue “Save Frame” button located in the upper-right corner of the “Grab Photo” screen.

“Grab Photo” screen, GoPro “Quik” app.

Choose the location where you would like to save the frame grab.

Select “Save to …” location, GoPro “Quik” app.

The frame grab is saved as an 8 MB JPG file, smaller than the 12 MB JPGs created when the camera is set for “Photo Mode.”

The file can be adjusted using your photo editor of choice, but there’s a limit to what you can do during post-processing of JPGs so it’s always a good idea to “get it right” in-camera.

Related Resources

Copyright © 2022 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

More settings: GoPro HERO4 Black

April 1, 2022

The following screen capture from the “GoPro app” (v7.1) shows the basic settings (highlighted by a green rectangle) used for the first video that I shot in the field using my GoPro HERO4 Black action camera.

I chose these settings by watching the following video from the GoPro Media Team: GoPro Field Guide: Resolutions, Frame Rates and FOV (Ep 2 of 3). I think these settings should be useful for most people most of the time. Try them and let me know what you think.

Screen capture of “GoPro app” (v7.1) running on Apple iPad mini 2.

Also notice that I recently tweaked the default Protune settings for ISO. For videos, I set the “ISO Max” to 400. For photos, I set the “ISO Min” to 100 and the “ISO Max” to 400. These settings are based upon years of personal experience using digital cameras with relatively small sensors.

Screen capture of “GoPro app” (v7.1) running on Apple iPad mini 2.

Sidebar – Sensor size versus noise

Generally speaking, the smaller a digital camera sensor the poorer its performance in low light. ISO can be increased in order to increase the “light sensitivity” of small camera sensors, but the trade-off is increased “noise” in your photos.

The following graphic shows the relative size of some camera sensors used by several types of digital cameras. The GoPro HERO4 Black features a 1/2.3″ sensor — the same size as the smallest rectangle, located in the lower-left corner of the graphic.

As you can see, the GoPro HERO4 Black action camera sensor is small, very small! For best results when using small sensor digital cameras such as the GoPro, it’s a good idea to set the ISO limit to no higher than 400.

Looking ahead

My next blog post will focus on how to edit photos and videos from your GoPro action camera. In the meantime, use your camera to shoot some test photos and video clips.

Related Resources

Copyright © 2022 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Settings: GoPro HERO4 Black

March 29, 2022

Let’s take stock of what we’ve accomplished as we work toward getting up-to-speed with our older GoPro action cameras: We recharged the battery or batteries and inserted a microSD memory card; paired the camera with GoPro “Quik” app; and updated the firmware. Now it’s time to make some settings and begin (again?) to use the GoPro to shoot photos and videos.

What are the best settings to use?

The best camera settings for shooting photos and videos using full-frame and crop-sensor digital cameras is highly subjective. It’s no different with action cameras — I’ve watched a lot of YouTube videos on the topic of GoPro camera settings and opinions vary widely. To a large extent, the settings you choose to use depends upon the intended use for the camera. I wish I had more experience using my GoPro so that I could share some wisdom — instead the best I can do is share some useful resources discovered while researching the topic.

How to make settings

Although it’s possible to operate the HERO4 Black model using the small LCD on the front of the camera … , it’s less than ideal for navigating menus and making settings. In my opinion, it’s much easier to pair the camera with either a smart phone or tablet running the GoPro “Quik” app and use one of those devices to control the camera remotely. Source credit: GoProse, by Walter Sanford.

Whenever possible, I prefer to use the GoPro “Quik” app to make settings. Sometimes we have no choice other than to make settings manually. For example, Protune settings. You might be wondering, “What is Protune?” The name makes me think it’s related to camera audio, but no-o-o-o-o, the Protune settings enable the user to shoot higher quality photos and videos. And you can’t make those settings using the GoPro “Quik” app. Wait, what?

GoPro Inc. is being sued for patent infringement by Contour IP Holding, LLC.

Therefore, the court agreed with Contour’s claim that GoPro’s remote app infringes on the technology patents and has done so since 2014. Source credit: Contour IP Holding, LLC v. GoPro, Inc. | Dunlap Bennett & Ludwig PLLC – JDSupra.

GoPro Inc. deleted the Protune settings from what was then called the “GoPro app” (now called “GoPro Quik”) beginning with v7.3.1, updated on 07 January 2021. Two things are worth noting here. The Protune settings are still featured on the camera, but you have to set them manually. That is unless you purchase a third-party app, or like me, you happen to have an older version of the “GoPro app” on your iOS device.

GoPro apps on my Apple iPad mini 2.

I have a copy of v7.1 on my iPad mini 2 (shown above) — the Protune settings are still included (shown below) and the app can be used set them remotely.

Protune Video Settings.

The first screen capture from the “GoPro app” (v7.1) shows the default Protune video settings; the second screen capture shows the default Protune photo settings.

Protune Photo Settings

The third screen capture from the “GoPro app” (v7.1) shows more settings.

More Settings

Doing it the old-fashioned way

Hero4 Black: How To Set Up Protune – GoPro Tip #507 by Mic Bergsma (3:13) is a video that shows how to make Protune settings manually by navigating the small LCD on the front of the camera. Mic is a well-known GoPro user who is hearing-impaired, so there is no narration. The show notes for the video feature a detailed explanation of each setting.

Looking ahead

I’ll talk more about settings when we start exploring some suggested applications to get you started using your action camera. In the meantime, I recommend you get started changing some or all of the default Protune settings — it will take a while to do manually!

Related Resources

Copyright © 2022 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Panasonic Image App

March 1, 2022

The Panasonic Image App enables wireless tethering of select Panasonic digital cameras with smart phones and tablets. The free app is available for both Apple iOS and Android devices.

The app works well when it’s used in a way that’s as simple and straightforward as possible — try to make all or almost all camera settings before starting the Wi-Fi connection (such as P, A, S, M), and limit the number of settings changes made using the app. Otherwise, there seems to be a risk of losing the Wi-Fi connection, although if that happens, it’s easy to reestablish the connection. Hey, there’s a reason many professional photographers prefer using a cable for tethering!

You can control the camera directly while using the app, but I don’t recommend it. In my limited experience using the app, I noticed this can result in the unexpected loss of the Wi-Fi connection.

Home

I highly recommend following Graham Houghton’s excellent directions for connecting the camera and iOS device. Regular readers of my blog might remember I reprogrammed the Fn2 button on my FZ300, so the way I start Wi-Fi is different than the procedure Graham describes in his YouTube video.

After a Wi-Fi connection is established between my Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ300 superzoom bridge camera and my Apple iPad mini 6, the “Home” screen appears in “Panasonic Image App.” Tap the “Remote operation” button.

Live Control

The following annotated screen capture shows the “Live Control” panel. The function of all of the buttons in the panel is labeled in red text except for ISO, but we know what that means, right?

The live view window (left side of panel) shows the camera settings across the top and bottom of the window. Tap the “DISP.” to toggle this information on/off.

Top, from left-to-right: Program mode; Standard photo style plus modifications; no flash; video settings; settings for picture size and quality; AFS (focus mode, single point); and AF Macro mode as indicated by the AF-flower(icon).

Bottom, from left-to-right: Metering Mode (single point); aperture f/2.8; shutter speed 2.5″; exposure meter; and White Balance (flash).

Tap the Program Shift button (P/double-headed arrow icon) in order to change settings in Program Mode. The icon that appears for this button varies depending upon the camera mode. For example, the icon changes to “F/SS” when the camera is set for Manual Mode, as shown in the next screen capture.

The following image shows the camera set for Custom setting C1 in Manual Mode.

Tap the “F/SS” button (shown above) and a menu appears to set the aperture (F) and shutter speed (SS), as shown below. Press the go-back icon to return to the “Live Control” panel.

Notice the up/down buttons for MF (Manual Focus) on the “Live Control” panel. I need to explore this feature further. I’m hoping this implementation of Manual Focus is better than the one featured on the FZ300. In my opinion, the implementation of Manual Focus on the FZ150 is far superior to the FZ300. Hey Panasonic, are you listening?

Press the “Q.MENU” button in the “Live Control” panel in order to see the “Recording Settings” panel.

“Jump Snap” — one of the most mysterious buttons on the “Live Control” panel — is explained in the section entitled “Taking pictures mid-jump” on the following Web page: Image App (iOS) – Digital Camera.

Playback

Tap the “Play back” button, located along the bottom of the screen, in order see all of the photos and videos saved to the camera memory card.

Tap the “Menu” button, located along the bottom of the screen, in order to access “Playback settings.”

“Live Control Settings” and “Help” (shown above) might be worth a look as well, although I don’t recall exploring those Menu items.

Related Resources

Copyright © 2022 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Post update: What is it?

January 18, 2022

The mystery item featured in my last blog post is a Beetle Spin® 1/8 oz fishing lure.

Beetle Spin® 1/8 oz fishing lure.

Perhaps the bigger mystery is how the fishing lure ended up where I found it, stuck in the bark of a tree (about head height) quite a distance from a small stream that might be fish-less. There was no fishing line attached to the lure. Anyway, there it was.

Beetle Spin® is one of the classic all-purpose fishing lures that is a nice addition to my tackle box.

Copyright © 2022 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

How to estimate instar using Photopea

December 3, 2021

In two recent blog posts (see Related Resources, below), I showed how Adobe Photoshop can be used to make measurements that enable you to estimate the instar of odonate larvae (nymphs).

The process works well, that is, as long as you have Photoshop. Does that mean you’re out of luck if you don’t? In a word, no.

Photopea” is a free alternative to Adobe Photoshop. Photopea is a Web-based clone of Photoshop — Photopea doesn’t do everything Photoshop does but it can be used to make measurements on photos using a workflow similar to the one I described in detail in a blog post entitled “How to estimate instar.”

Practical example using Photopea

Open Photopea in a Web browser: www.photopea.com (For what it’s worth, I prefer “Google Chrome.”) Since Photopea is Web-based, it runs on desktop computers, laptop computers, tablets, and smart phones.

In order to make this tutorial as simple as possible I went to the Photopea menu bar, navigated to File / New… and created the default blank white canvas, shown below. Note: You should go to File / Open… and navigate to a photo of an odonate larva.

Use the Photopea “Ruler Tool” to measure the length (in pixels) of two line segments: HwL (Hind wing Length); and HW (Head Width). If you don’t know how to measure “HwL” and “HW” then please refer to “How to estimate instar” for detailed, step-by-step instructions.

Right-click on the Eyedropper Tool — located in the left sidebar of the main window, as shown below — and select the Ruler Tool.

Click and drag line segment HwL, such as the sample line shown below. Record the length of the line, in pixels. Click the “Clear” button (optional) and repeat the same process for line segment HW (not shown).

Do the math to calculate instar equivalent and voilà, the result is a number that can be used to estimate instar based upon Ken Tennessen’s average instar equivalents. Again, please refer to “How to estimate instar” for detailed, step-by-step instructions.

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