Archive for the ‘Fujinon XF80mm macro lens’ Category

Another unknown species of odonate exuvia

November 4, 2019

Another odonate exuvia was collected by Michael Powell during a photowalk with me on 01 June 2019 at Occoquan Regional Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. The genus and species is unknown.

Occoquan Regional Park | unknown species | exuvia (face-head)

This specimen might be a member of Family Libellulidae (Skimmers), as indicated by its labium (face mask) and pointy eyes.

Although this exuvia looks similar to the other one that Mike collected on 01 June 2019, it’s smaller and probably not another Slaty Skimmer (L. incesta) exuvia. Many species of skimmers are habitat generalists; the small pond where both exuviae were found is a perfect spot for many members of this family.

The photo (shown above) is a one-off, not a composite image. I plan to create higher quality composite images of this exuvia, shown from all viewpoints including dorsal, ventral, and lateral views. The composite images and one or more dichotomous keys will be used to attempt to identify the genus/species of the specimen.

Related Resource: Vimeo video: Identifying dragonfly larva to family (8:06).

Tech Tips

The following equipment was used to shoot the quick-and-dirty macro photograph featured in this post: Fujifilm X-T1 digital camera; Fujifilm MCEX-11 extension tube; and Fujinon XF80mm macro lens plus lens hood. The camera was set for both manual exposure and manual focus. That’s right, a switch on the camera body is used to set the type of focus. It’s a Fujifilm thing. Camera settings: focal length 80mm (120mm, 35mm equivalent); ISO 200; f/16; 1/180s.

Godox X2TF radio flash trigger, mounted on the hotshoe of my X-T1, was used to control two off-camera external flash units set for radio slave mode: Godox TT685F Thinklite TTL Flash (manual mode); and Godox TT685o/p Thinklite Flash for Olympus/Panasonic Cameras (manual mode). Both flash units were fitted with a Lastolite Ezybox Speed-Lite 2 flash modifier.

Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to spot-heal and sharpen the image.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Building a case for Slaty Skimmer

October 23, 2019

With each new photo set of this unknown species of odonate exuvia, a case is building slowly for Slaty Skimmer (Libellula incesta).

Occoquan Regional Park | unknown species | exuvia (lateral)

A piece of white schmutz was removed from the tip of the abdomen, enabling a clearer view of abdominal segment nine (S9). Look closely at the two photos featured in this post. Notice there are stubby mid-dorsal hooks (not cultriform) on abdominal segments four through eight (S4-S8).

Occoquan Regional Park | unknown species | exuvia (dorsal)

The last photo shows a closer view of the anal pyramid. Notice the lateral caudal appendages (cerci) are less than half as long as the inferior appendages (paraprocts).

Soltesz, p. 43 – Key to the Species of the Genus Libellula

Field marks that match this specimen are highlighted in boldface green text.

1b. Dorsal hooks regularly present on segments 4 to 8. [2]
2b. Palpal setae 5 (sometimes 6 in cyanea). [5]
5a. Epiproct distinctly decurved at tip. [6]
6b. Length of last instar about 26mm; cerci less than half as long as paraprocts. [incesta]

Punch List

I need to look at the inside of the labium (face mask) in order to count palpal setae. The epiproct must be cleaned to see whether it is decurved. This exuvia was deformed as a result of emergence, so it’s impossible to make an accurate measurement of the length of the specimen. That said, the exuvia is more than 22.0 mm (0.9 in) long. (22 mm is the length of the last instar for L. cyanea.)

And of course, I need to annotate all of the images in this series of blog posts in order to illustrate the unfamiliar vocabulary that is used in virtually all dichotomous identification keys.

Related Resources

Tech Tips

The following equipment was used to shoot the quick-and-dirty macro photographs featured in this post: Fujifilm X-T1 digital camera; Fujifilm MCEX-16 extension tube; and Fujinon XF80mm macro lens plus lens hood. The camera was set for both manual exposure and manual focus. That’s right, a switch on the camera body is used to set the type of focus. It’s a Fujifilm thing. Camera settings: focal length 80mm (120mm, 35mm equivalent); ISO 200; f/16; 1/180s.

Godox X2TF radio flash trigger, mounted on the hotshoe of my X-T1, was used to control two off-camera external flash units set for radio slave mode: Godox TT685F Thinklite TTL Flash (manual mode); and Godox TT685o/p Thinklite Flash for Olympus/Panasonic Cameras (manual mode). Both flash units were fitted with a Lastolite Ezybox Speed-Lite 2 flash modifier.

Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to spot-heal and sharpen the image.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Unknown species of odonate exuvia (ventral)

October 21, 2019

This post features another photo of an odonate exuvia collected by Michael Powell during a photowalk with me on 01 June 2019 at Occoquan Regional Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. The photo is a one-off (not a composite image) showing the ventral view of the exuvia.

The genus and species is unknown. This specimen might be a member of Family Libellulidae (Skimmers), probably Slaty Skimmer (Libellula incesta).

Occoquan Regional Park | unknown species | exuvia (ventral)

Related Resource: Vimeo video: Identifying dragonfly larva to family (8:06).

Tech Tips

The following equipment was used to shoot the quick-and-dirty macro photograph featured in this post: Fujifilm X-T1 digital camera; Fujifilm MCEX-16 extension tube; and Fujinon XF80mm macro lens plus lens hood. The camera was set for both manual exposure and manual focus. That’s right, a switch on the camera body is used to set the type of focus. It’s a Fujifilm thing. Camera settings: focal length 80mm (120mm, 35mm equivalent); ISO 200; f/16; 1/180s.

Godox X2TF radio flash trigger, mounted on the hotshoe of my X-T1, was used to control two off-camera external flash units set for radio slave mode: Godox TT685F Thinklite TTL Flash (manual mode); and Godox TT685o/p Thinklite Flash for Olympus/Panasonic Cameras (manual mode). Both flash units were fitted with a Lastolite Ezybox Speed-Lite 2 flash modifier.

Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to spot-heal and sharpen the image.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Unknown species of odonate exuvia, revisited

October 18, 2019

This post features more photos of an odonate exuvia collected by Michael Powell during a photowalk with me on 01 June 2019 at Occoquan Regional Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. Both photos are one-offs, not composite images.

The genus and species is unknown. This specimen might be a member of Family Libellulidae (Skimmers).

Occoquan Regional Park | unknown species | exuvia (lateral)

Mid-dorsal hooks are present on some abdominal segments. Lateral spines are located on abdominal segments eight and nine (S8-9).

Occoquan Regional Park | unknown species | exuvia (dorsal)

I still need to take close-up photos of the anal pyramid and shoot photos of the ventral view before I attempt to identify the genus/species of the specimen using one or more dichotomous keys.

Related Resource: Vimeo video: Identifying dragonfly larva to family (8:06).

Tech Tips

The following equipment was used to shoot the quick-and-dirty macro photograph featured in this post: Fujifilm X-T1 digital camera; Fujifilm MCEX-16 extension tube; and Fujinon XF80mm macro lens plus lens hood. The camera was set for both manual exposure and manual focus. That’s right, a switch on the camera body is used to set the type of focus. It’s a Fujifilm thing. Camera settings: focal length 80mm (120mm, 35mm equivalent); ISO 200; f/16; 1/180s.

Godox X2TF radio flash trigger, mounted on the hotshoe of my X-T1, was used to control two off-camera external flash units set for radio slave mode: Godox TT685F Thinklite TTL Flash (manual mode); and Godox TT685o/p Thinklite Flash for Olympus/Panasonic Cameras (manual mode). Both flash units were fitted with a Lastolite Ezybox Speed-Lite 2 flash modifier.

Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to spot-heal and sharpen the image.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Unknown species of odonate exuvia

October 16, 2019

An odonate exuvia was collected by Michael Powell during a photowalk with me on 01 June 2019 at Occoquan Regional Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. The genus and species is unknown.

Occoquan Regional Park | unknown species | exuvia (face-head)

This specimen might be a member of Family Libellulidae (Skimmers), as indicated by its labium (face mask) and pointy eyes.

The photo (shown above) is a one-off, not a composite image. I plan to create higher quality composite images of this exuvia, shown from all viewpoints including dorsal, ventral, and lateral views. The composite images and one or more dichotomous keys will be used to attempt to identify the genus/species of the specimen.

Related Resource: Vimeo video: Identifying dragonfly larva to family (8:06).

Tech Tips

The following equipment was used to shoot the quick-and-dirty macro photograph featured in this post: Fujifilm X-T1 digital camera; Fujifilm MCEX-11 extension tube; and Fujinon XF80mm macro lens plus lens hood. The camera was set for both manual exposure and manual focus. That’s right, a switch on the camera body is used to set the type of focus. It’s a Fujifilm thing. Camera settings: focal length 80mm (120mm, 35mm equivalent); ISO 200; f/16; 1/180s.

Godox X2TF radio flash trigger, mounted on the hotshoe of my X-T1, was used to control two off-camera external flash units set for radio slave mode: Godox TT685F Thinklite TTL Flash (manual mode); and Godox TT685o/p Thinklite Flash for Olympus/Panasonic Cameras (manual mode). Both flash units were fitted with a Lastolite Ezybox Speed-Lite 2 flash modifier.

Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to spot-heal and sharpen the image.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Dromogomphus spinosus exuvia

June 28, 2019

A dragonfly exuvia was collected by Joe Johnston on 22 May 2019 at Aquia Creek, Stafford County, Virginia USA. This specimen is the cast skin from a Black-shouldered Spinyleg (Dromogomphus spinosus) larva. D. spinosus is a member of Family Gomphidae (Clubtails).

Black-shouldered Spinyleg (Dromogomphus spinosus) | exuvia (dorsal)

At first I thought the exuvia might be a species from the genus Stylurus, based upon the mid-dorsal spine on abdominal segment nine (S9). After careful examination of two excellent photo-illustrated PowerPoint presentations by Kevin Hemeon at NymphFest 2016 (see Related Resources, below), I noticed none of the species in the genus Stylurus have dorsal hooks. That’s when I realized the specimen must be D. spinosus. Eureka!

Related Resources

The following PowerPoint presentations by Kevin Hemeon are available in the “Files” section of the Northeast Odonata Facebook group. Direct links to the documents are provided below.

The Backstory

Joe Johnston is an avid boater and sport fisherman who kindly agreed to be my “Eyes on the Aquia,” always on the lookout for odonate exuvia to share with me. On 22 May 2019 Joe caught a largemouth bass that swam around one of the wooden pilings of a boat dock that extends far into Aquia Creek. The fishing line was snagged on the piling so Joe moved his boat into position to free the fish. That’s when he noticed the exuvia clinging to a piling on the underside of the dock. Good catches, Joe!

Tech Tips

The following equipment was used to shoot the quick-and-dirty handheld macro photograph featured in this post: Fujifilm X-T1 digital camera; and Fujinon XF80mm macro lens plus lens hood. The camera was set for both manual exposure and manual focus. That’s right, a switch on the camera body is used to set the type of focus. It’s a Fujifilm thing. Actually, back-button focus was used to autofocus the image and adjusted manually as necessary. That’s also a Fujifilm thing. Camera settings: focal length 80mm (120mm, 35mm equivalent); ISO 200; f/9; 1/180s.

Godox XProF radio flash trigger, mounted on the hotshoe of my X-T1, was used to control an off-camera Godox TT685 Thinklite TTL Flash (TT685F) set for radio slave mode. The flash was fitted with a Lastolite Ezybox Speed-Lite 2 flash modifier.

Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to spot-heal and sharpen the image, plus add annotations.

Sometime in the future (probably the odonate “off-season”) I will create higher quality composite images of this exuvia, shown from all viewpoints including the ventral view. As it turns out, the dorsal view is sufficient to identify this species.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Dragonflies rock!

May 15, 2019

I received a surprise parcel in the U.S. Mail from my dear friend Susan Kinsley. There was a cover note inside the box…

The church where I work has a ministry where they paint rocks and then place them in the community for people to find to brighten their day. When I saw this one in the basket, I decided that you needed to have it. The woman in charge of the ministry gave me permission to take it and send it, rather than trying to hide it at Huntley Meadows or somewhere you might, or might not, find it. Enjoy! Susan

There’s a friend who knows me well. Thanks for thinking of me, Susan. God bless you!

Related Resource: Sydenstricker UMC Rocks! Facebook group.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Aging gracefully

March 1, 2019

The following gallery features several photos of a Valentines Day gift of appreciation from The Beacon of Groveton. A little more than two weeks after the red rose was delivered, the flower appears to be aging gracefully.

I experimented with a different lighting setup than the last photo shoot of this flower. An articulating Loc-line arm was used to hold and pose the cut flower. The background is a 12″ x 12″ piece of white plastic, mounted vertically and backlighted by a radio-controlled external flash unit. Notice the vignetting on the left side of the photo, caused by the flower being offset from the center of the sweet spot of the backlight.

28 FEB 2019 | BoG Photo Studio | Valentines Day rose

The simplest solution to the vignetting problem is to crop the image. Ah, much better, and much closer to achieving my vision for the finished product — the red rose posed against a clean white background!

28 FEB 2019 | BoG Photo Studio | Valentines Day rose

The next photo is the only photo in the set that turned out exactly as I wanted. Well, the flash in Group B (off camera, to the front-left of the subject) is a little too bright, but that’s just the perfectionist in me talking.

28 FEB 2019 | BoG Photo Studio | Valentines Day rose

The first two photos were taken at f/8. I moved the camera closer to the subject for the last photo and switched to f/11 for more depth of field. The shadow of the flower stem on the white background wasn’t part of my plan — I’m not sure whether it adds to the photo or detracts. What do you think?

28 FEB 2019 | BoG Photo Studio | Valentines Day rose

Tech Tips

The following equipment (shown below) was used to shoot the preceding photos: Fujifilm X-T1 digital camera; Fujifilm MCEX-16 extension tube (for some photos, but not all); Fujinon XF80mm macro lensGodox XProF TTL Wireless Flash Trigger for Fujifilm cameras; a Godox TT685F Thinklite TTL Flash for Fujifilm Cameras; a Godox TT685C Thinklite TTL Flash for Canon Cameras fitted with a Lastolite Ezybox Speed-Lite 2 flash modifier; and a Godox TT685O Thinklite Flash for Olympus/Panasonic Cameras. All three flashes were set for radio-controlled slave mode, in Manual Mode.

Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to spot-heal and sharpen the final output.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Sometimes you just need to stop…

February 20, 2019

…and smell, er, see the roses. Seriously, man doesn’t live by odonates alone!

The following gallery features several photos of a Valentines Day gift of appreciation from The Beacon of Groveton. Nearly a week after the red rose was delivered, it’s beginning to show a little “character.”

19 FEB 2019 | BoG Photo Studio | Valentines Day rose

19 FEB 2019 | BoG Photo Studio | Valentines Day rose

19 FEB 2019 | BoG Photo Studio | Valentines Day rose

Tech Tips

The subject was posed in front of a black background — the lower door of the refrigerator!

The following equipment (shown below) was used to shoot the preceding photos: Fujifilm X-T1 digital camera; Fujifilm MCEX-16 extension tube; Fujinon XF80mm macro lensGodox XProF TTL Wireless Flash Trigger for Fujifilm cameras; and a Godox TT685C Thinklite TTL Flash for Canon Cameras fitted with a Lastolite Ezybox Speed-Lite 2 flash modifier. A Sunpak LED-160 Video Light was used to add fill light to some of the photos.

Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to spot-heal and sharpen the final output.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Test shots: “Generic Baskettail?”

February 15, 2019

larva/nymph in the Family Corduliidae (Emeralds) was collected by Bob Perkins on 02 December 2017 from a pond in Orange Park, Florida (USA). The larva died before it metamorphosed into an adult.

Test shots of this beautifully preserved specimen were taken using a small-ish aperture of f/11 for greater depth of field. The following photos are “one-offs,” that is, not composite images.

Dorsal

A single focus point — located on the thorax (specifcally, the “shoulder pad” along the right side of the body) — was used to shoot this photo. The specimen has enough “relief” that focus on the wing pads and dorsal hooks is slightly soft. This view of the larva is a good candidate for focus-stacking.

The terminal appendages (cerci, epiproct, paraprocts) are shown clearly in the following photo.

“Generic Baskettail” larva (preserved specimen) | Orange Park, FL USA

Bob’s best guess of the identity of the specimen is Epitheca sp., either Common Baskettail (Epitheca cynosura) or Prince Baskettail (Epitheca princeps).

Whenever I see an odonate larvae/exuviae with long legs, my first thought is Family Macromiidae (Cruisers). Then I check for a horn on top of the head, a key field marker for Cruisers. Look closely at the dorsal view of the larva and I think you’ll agree with me there appears to be a horn on the head. I would like to take close-up photos of the head and key out the specimen in order to determine its identity. In the meantime, my best guess is Stream Cruiser (Didmops transversa) as indicated by the lateral spines on abdominal segment nine (S9) and the absence of a dorsal hook on S10.

Ventral

The ventral side of the specimen has almost no “relief,” so a “one-off” focused on the thorax looks fairly good from head-to-tail.

“Generic Baskettail” larva (preserved specimen) | Orange Park, FL USA

Related Resource: “Generic Baskettail” (definitely not a Cruiser)

Tech Tips

The following equipment (shown below) was used to shoot the preceding photos: Fujifilm X-T1 digital camera; Fujifilm MCEX-16 extension tube; Fujinon XF80mm macro lensGodox XProF TTL Wireless Flash Trigger for Fujifilm camerasGodox TT685F Thinklite TTL Flash for Fujifilm CamerasGodox TT685C Thinklite TTL Flash for Canon Cameras fitted with a Lastolite Ezybox Speed-Lite 2 flash modifier; and a Canon 580EX II Speedlite mounted on a Godox X1R-C TTL Wireless Flash Trigger Receiver for Canon. A new Godox TT685O Thinklite TTL Flash for Olympus/Panasonic Cameras was added to an array of radio-controlled external flash units used to light the specimen. All flashes were set for Manual Mode at 1/128 power.

Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to spot-heal and sharpen the final output.

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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