Archive for the ‘Godox TT685F’ Category

More experimentation with tethered shooting

August 12, 2020

Oh no! I have become the blogger who cried wolf. Yes, I’m guilty of over-promising and under-delivering. I promise to do better. Oops, I did it again! (Queue Britney Spears…)

Why tethered shooting?

In case you’re wondering what piqued my interest in tethered shooting, I was bored. I had figured out all there is to know about non-tethered shooting so I needed a new challenge. Not!

Tethered shooting enables me to quickly check composition, exposure, and focus, to name a few advantages of tethered versus non-tethered shooting — on a larger screen than the LCD on the back of my cameras.

Bear in mind, I don’t want to edit the photo files using my laptop computer (Apple 11″ MacBook Air) — I prefer to use my desktop computer (Apple 24″ iMac) for photo editing.

Latest testing

The following photos were taken by tethering my Fujifilm X-T3 digital camera to an Apple 11″ MacBook Air computer, via a TetherTools USB cable. FUJIFILM Tether Shooting Plug-in PRO was used to save JPG files to a folder on the desktop of my MacBook Air; in turn, the JPG images were displayed in Adobe Lightroom. Both JPG and RAF files were saved to one of two memory cards in the X-T3.

Notice the difference in way these two photos were lighted. Both shots were taken using a single off-camera flash. The position of the flash resulted in more- or less dramatic light. Each shot shows something better than the other, so I was unable to choose a clear favorite. What’s your preference?

Tips and Tricks

Oh yeah, the tips and tricks I have been promising are still in the pipeline. I made some screen grabs today to illustrate the process of tethered shooting. Turns out I overlooked a critical setting so all of the graphics are useless. Doh! Can you say “Do over”?

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

As promised…

August 9, 2020

A rare weekend blog post

The following photo was taken by tethering my Fujifilm X-T3 digital camera to an Apple 11″ MacBook Air computer, via a TetherTools USB cable. Fujifilm X Aquire (free) was used to save JPG files to a folder on the desktop of my MacBook Air; both JPG and RAF files were saved to one of two memory cards in the X-T3.

Apple “Preview” was used to view the JPG files saved to my MacBook Air. Looking at larger versions of the photos than can be seen on the X-T3 LCD enabled me to position the exuvia exactly as I wanted.

Notice the left eye is overexposed slightly (as well as the farthest tip of the left middle leg), probably caused by positioning the subject too close to the white background. Hey, it’s been a while since I did much studio macro photography — I need to play myself into game shape!

More details, including some of the tips and tricks I promised, will be provided in my regularly-scheduled blog post on Monday, 10 August 2020. Please stay tuned!

The Backstory

Swift River Cruiser dragonfly (Macromia illinoiensisexuvia was collected on 27 May 2017 along the Potomac River at Riverbend Park in Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female.

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

First foray into tethered shooting

August 5, 2020

My first foray into tethered shooting occurred on 01 August 2020. Although I felt like I had no idea what I was doing, I was able to successfully connect my Fujifilm X-T3 digital camera to an Apple 11″ MacBook Air computer, via a TetherTools USB cable. The screen on my laptop shows the display for the FUJIFILM Tether Shooting Plug-in PRO (Mac) for Adobe Lightroom.

Screen display for 11″ MacBook Air.

I will backfill this post with more details about the hardware and software used to capture the following image, taken a few days after “first light.” In the meantime, I’m SO LATE in publishing my blog post for Wednesday I just want to put something out there STAT. Please revisit this post at a later time to read the updated version.

A Swift River Cruiser dragonfly (Macromia illinoiensis) exuvia was collected on 27 May 2017 along the Potomac River at Riverbend Park in Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a female. Notice the prominent horn on the head, a key field mark for exuviae from Family Macromiidae (Cruisers).

Ignore the bad background and quick-and-dirty lighting — this photo isn’t so much about making a good macro photo as it is the process used to make it. More later…I promise!

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Flash photography: Backlighting the background

August 3, 2020

The following annotated photo shows a recent iteration of my “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique studio macro photography rig, set up at BoG Photo Studio, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

The rig has evolved since the photo was taken: On the flash used to backlight the background, I exchanged the Lastolite Ezybox Speed-lite 2 (No. 7, above) for a small altura PHOTO softbox that seems to work as well as the larger Lastolite softbox. The swap enables me to use the two larger softboxes for lighting the subject.

In my last blog post, I posed a question.

How far should should an external flash unit fitted with some type of diffuser be positioned from the backside of a translucent white plastic sheet used to create a pure white background (255, 255, 255) using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique? Source Credit: Flash photography: 1:1 rule-of-thumb, by Walter Sanford.

Disclaimer: The following information explains how I figured out the answer to my question. Trial and error experimentation suggests my answer is valid. Opinions to the contrary are invited and welcome.

altura PHOTO flash diffuser

Imagine an isosceles triangle with an external flash unit at Point A, shown below, pointed toward Line BC. Line BC represents the translucent white plastic sheet (No. 2, above) that I use for the background when shooting small objects such as the odonate exuvia posed on a clear plastic stage (No. 3, above). Note: The white plastic sheet is actually 12″ square. I used a value of 12.1″ because the calculator doesn’t allow me to choose 12.0″. Go figure!

In the last post, we learned that the face of the Altura softbox should be positioned at a distance of 7.8″ or less from the subject; this is the altitude of the triangle shown below. Notice that Angle A is 76 degrees. Experiment with the Isosceles Triangle calculator by moving Point A (the external flash) closer to Line BC (the backside of the background); notice that Angle A increases as the altitude of the triangle decreases.

Isosceles Triangle calculator output courtesy Math Open Reference.

Have you noticed that your external flash unit has a “Zoom” setting? It does, or it should. It would be so simple if the increments for Zoom were in angular degrees. Instead, the units are in millimeters of focal length, as in the focal length of a lens. This where the water gets muddy!

The “field of view” for a given lens is determined by the 35mm equivalent of the lens and the size of the camera sensor. The same lens has a different field of view depending upon whether it is mounted on either a full-frame or crop-sensor camera. Long story short, check the table entitled “Focal lengths with same field of view” that’s embedded in the article “Focal Length and Field of View Explained in 4 Steps” in order to determine the Zoom setting for your external flash.

As a practical matter, choose the Zoom setting for a field of view that is closest to Angle A. The Zoom setting (field of view) can be wider than Angle A but shouldn’t less than Angle A because that will cause a “hotspot” on the background.

Lastolite flash diffuser

For what it’s worth, here’s the Isosceles Triangle calculator output for the Lastolite flash diffuser shown in the photo at the beginning of this blog post. Notice the face of the flash diffuser is positioned closer than 12.2″ from the background, so Angle A will be larger than 52 degrees. Set the Zoom function accordingly.

Isosceles Triangle calculator output courtesy Math Open Reference.

Related Resources

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Common Green Darner dragonfly (external female reproductive anatomy)

June 5, 2020

For some species of odonate exuviae, sex is indicated by a form of remnant reproductive anatomy. These external structures don’t look exactly the same for all species of dragonflies and damselflies, but their function is identical.

As far as I know, this is true for all species in the Family Aeshnidae (Darners) such as Common Green Darner dragonfly (Anax junius).

The following photograph shows a ventral view of a female Common Green Darner dragonfly. Notice the external reproductive anatomical structure on abdominal segment nine (S9) is virtually identical to the remnant anatomical structure on S9 of the exuvia, shown above.

Original photo used with permission from Louisa C. Craven.

The Backstory

My dear friend Louisa Craven discovered the lifeless adult dragonfly while on vacation with her family in Nags Head, North Carolina USA. Louisa is an accomplished wildlife photographer who developed an interest in odonates as a result of many photowalks with me.

Related Resources

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

MYN – Hylogomphus adelphus exuvia (dorsal)

May 4, 2020

The following Anisoptera exuvia — collected by Freda van den Broek on 10 June 2019 along the St. Croix River in Polk County, Wisconsin USA — is definitely a member of Family Gomphidae (Clubtails), probably Mustached Clubtail (Hylogomphus adelphus).

Dorsal view

The abdomen is wider than the head. Vestigial mid-dorsal hooks are noticeable along several abdominal segments, especially segment nine (S9). A “median groove” is apparent along part of the abdomen. The lateral spine on S9 is spinulose-serrate along the outer edge.

10 JUN 2019 | Polk County, WI | H. adelphus exuvia (dorsal)

Related Resources

Tech Tips

This subject was photographed against a pure white background (255, 255, 255) using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique.

15 photos of the specimen were taken using an aperture of f/16; in-camera focus peaking was used to highlight select areas in each photo. Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to create- and annotate the focus-stacked composite image shown above.

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

MYN – Hylogomphus adelphus exuvia (ventral)

May 1, 2020

The following Anisoptera exuvia — collected by Freda van den Broek on 10 June 2019 along the St. Croix River in Polk County, Wisconsin USA — is definitely a member of Family Gomphidae (Clubtails), probably Mustached Clubtail (Hylogomphus adelphus).

Ventral view

Notice the exuvia has a flat labium (prementum). There are lateral spines located on abdominal segments six through nine (S6-S9); the lateral spine on S9 is spinulose-serrate along the outer edge. Also notice the well-developed tibial burrowing hooks on its legs.

10 JUN 2019 | Polk County, WI | H. adelphus exuvia (ventral)

Male (vestigial genitalia)

Male odonates have two sets of sex organs: primary genitalia located on abdominal segment nine (S9); and secondary genitalia located on abdominal segments two-to-three (S2-3).

Both sets of vestigial genitalia are clearly visible on the ventral side of some (but not all) specimens, such as the H. adelphus exuvia shown above.

Related Resources

Tech Tips

This subject was photographed against a pure white background (255, 255, 255) using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique.

12 photos of the specimen were taken using an aperture of f/16; in-camera focus peaking was used to highlight select areas in each photo. A subset of six (6) photos and Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 were used to create- and annotate the focus-stacked composite image shown above.

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

MYN – Hylogomphus adelphus exuvia

April 29, 2020

An Anisoptera exuvia was collected by Freda van den Broek on 10 June 2019 along the St. Croix River in Polk County, Wisconsin USA.

This specimen is definitely a member of Family Gomphidae (Clubtails), probably Mustached Clubtail (Hylogomphus adelphus).

10 JUN 2019 | Polk County, WI | Anisoptera exuvia (face-head-dorsal)

Related Resources

Tech Tips

This subject was photographed against a pure white background (255, 255, 255) using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique. This photo is a “one-off,” that is, not a composite image.

Eight (8) photos of the specimen were taken using an aperture of f/16; in-camera focus peaking was used to highlight select areas in each photo. Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 will be used to create a focus-stacked composite image of the exuvia.

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

MYN – Too dark or too light?

April 27, 2020

The following Anisoptera exuvia — collected by Freda van den Broek on 10 June 2019 along the Red Cedar River in Barron County, Wisconsin USA — is definitely a member of Family Gomphidae (Clubtails), possibly Rusty Snaketail (Ophiogomphus rupinsulensis).

Dorsal-lateral view

Nine (9) photos of the specimen were taken using an aperture of f/16; in-camera focus peaking was used to highlight select areas in each photo. Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to create the focus-stacked composite image shown below.

10 JUN 2019 | Barron County, WI | Anisoptera exuvia (dorsallateral)

When I previewed the RAW files used to create the preceding composite image, I thought most of the files look too dark.

So I did a do-over using 15 photos, resulting in a new version of the composite that is perfectly in focus but a little too light. Compare/contrast the two composite images and you should notice it’s easier to see the mid-dorsal hooks along the abdomen in the first image. The primary purpose for the images is to illustrate those field marks, therefore I think the first (darker) image is better.

10 JUN 2019 | Barron County, WI | Anisoptera exuvia (dorsallateral)

Face-head-dorsal view

Five (5) photos of the specimen were taken using an aperture of f/16; in-camera focus peaking was used to highlight select areas in each photo. Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to create the focus-stacked composite image shown below.

10 JUN 2019 | Barron County, WI | Anisoptera exuvia (face-head-dorsal)

My first impression of the version shown above is it’s too dark, and I second-guessed myself for not shooting more photos for the focus stack.

I created a new focus-stacked composite image using a little more light and 14 photos. When I examined the RAW files used to create the new composite image (shown below), I thought most of the files still look too dark. (But I was wrong.)

10 JUN 2019 | Barron County, WI | Anisoptera exuvia (face-head-dorsal)

So I created a third version using much more light and 24 photos. Although it’s debatable which image looks best, the first- and second images show a few key field marks of the antennae better than the third image.

It turns out the antennae are one indicator this specimen is from the genus Ophiogomphus (Snaketails), so the first two (darker) images are the winners once again.

10 JUN 2019 | Barron County, WI | Anisoptera exuvia (face-head-dorsal)

For what it’s worth, the second of three images is my favorite as indicated by the fact that the image is cropped so there’s room for annotations.

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

MYN – Clubtail exuvia (dorsal-lateral view)

April 24, 2020

The following Anisoptera exuvia — collected by Freda van den Broek on 10 June 2019 along the Red Cedar River in Barron County, Wisconsin USA — is definitely a member of Family Gomphidae (Clubtails), possibly Rusty Snaketail (Ophiogomphus rupinsulensis).

10 JUN 2019 | Barron County, WI | Anisoptera exuvia (dorsallateral)

Notice the exuvia has little stubby mid-dorsal hooks along the length of its abdomen, and lateral spines on abdominal segments seven through nine (S7-S9).

Tech Tips

This subject was photographed against a pure white background (255, 255, 255) using the “Meet Your Neighbours” (MYN) technique.

15 photos of the specimen were taken using an aperture of f/16; in-camera focus peaking was used to highlight select areas in each photo. Adobe Photoshop CC 2017 was used to create the focus-stacked composite image shown above.

Copyright © 2020 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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