Posts Tagged ‘male’

Blue Corporal dragonflies (males)

April 24, 2017

Several Blue Corporal dragonflies (Ladona deplanata) were spotted at Hidden Pond, Meadowood Recreation Area, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. All of the individuals featured in this post are males, as indicated by their coloration and terminal appendages.

Blue Corporals are among the first species of odonates to emerge in the spring, beginning in mid-April. Hidden Pond is one of a few places in Northern Virginia where Blue Corporals are relatively common.

Although Blue Corporals prefer to perch flat on the ground, sometimes they pose for “Odonarty” photos, as shown below.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Non-stop flight

April 22, 2017

On 18 April 2017, a Common Baskettail dragonfly (Epitheca cynosura) was spotted patrolling part of the shoreline at Mulligan Pond, Jackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, in flight.

108mm (600mm equivalent) | ISO 100 | f/5.2 | 1/800s | -1 ev | flash fired

The photograph was taken using a Panasonic LUMIX DMC-FZ150 superzoom bridge camera and a Canon 580EX Speedlite external flash set for manual mode at 1/8 power and 105mm zoom.

Related Resource: Stop-action photography of dragonflies in flight, a blog post by Walter Sanford, features Phil Wherry’s answer to my question “How fast would the camera shutter speed need to be in order to freeze all motion of a dragonfly in flight?”

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Stream Cruiser dragonfly (male)

April 14, 2017

Another Stream Cruiser dragonfly (Didymops transversa) was spotted during a photowalk along Beaver Pond Loop Trail at Accotink Bay Wildlife Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

This individual is a male, as indicated by his “indented” hind wings and terminal appendages.

Stream Cruiser dragonflies typically perch at a 45° angle because of their extremely long legs, especially noticeable in the last photo.

For another perspective on the same male, both literally and figuratively, see Stream Cruiser dragonfly by fellow photoblogger Michael Powell.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

House Finches

April 8, 2017

Sometime after I moved to a new apartment, I noticed some cute little reddish-brown birds that sing a cheerful song. I used the free Merlin Bird ID App to identify the bird based upon a few simple observations. Turns out my little friends are House Finches (Haemorhous mexicanus).

As time passed and months stretched into years, I realized the birds appeared in the spring, hung around all summer, and disappeared in the fall.

These newly established eastern populations have since become migratory, and now spend winters in the southern parts of the United States. Source Credit: BioKIDS.

05 APR 2017 | The Beacon of Groveton | House Finch (male)

These photos show two of several House Finches spotted recently near the top of the seven-story parking garage at the Beacon of Groveton, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. Both individuals are male, as indicated by their reddish coloration.

05 APR 2017 | The Beacon of Groveton | House Finch (male)

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Common Sanddragon dragonfly (male)

March 29, 2017

As you might expect, Common Sanddragon dragonflies (Progomphus obscurus) commonly perch on the sandy banks of small woodland streams. Not this one!

A Common Sanddragon was spotted perching on the vegetation growing alongside a manmade concrete drainage ditch that flows into Dogue Creek, Wickford Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

This individual is a male, as indicated by his terminal appendages. Like all male clubtail dragonflies, the hindwings of male Common Sanddragons are “indented” near the body. This distinctive field marker is shown well by the last photo in this gallery.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Personality

March 9, 2017

In my experience, some dragonflies have a personality. Like this male Banded Pennant dragonfly (Celithemis fasciata) spotted at Hidden Pond, Meadowood Recreation Area, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

I photographed two other male Banded Pennants; both of them were relatively skittish. Not this guy. It’s like he sensed I wasn’t a threat to his well-being and allowed me to get up close and, well, personal.

Regular readers of my photoblog know I’m fond of head-tilts — one way in which dragonflies seem to display some of their personality. Both shots show a slight head-tilt to the left.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Malformed Cobra Clubtail dragonflies

February 21, 2017

I took 255 photographs during my first photowalk along the Potomac River at Riverbend Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA, including lots of photos of Cobra Clubtail dragonflies (Gomphurus vastus). I noticed several malformed individuals when I reviewed the entire photo set recently (in search of look-alike species of clubtail dragonflies). None of the malformations prevented the dragonflies from functioning normally.

The first Cobra Clubtail is a male with a slightly crimped right hind wing, where a small part of the wing failed to fully inflate during emergence.

The next individual is a female. Notice that abdominal segment seven (S7) was crimped during emergence. (All dragonflies and damselflies have a 10-segmented abdomen, numbered from front to back.)

The last individual is a male. Notice his left front leg is missing. The male is either malformed or he lost the leg due to injury.

A Cobra Clubtail dragonfly (Gomphurus vastus) spotted at Riverbend Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male; its left front leg is missing. Two dark face bars are field markers that can be used to differentiate Cobra Clubtail from other similar looking species of clubtails.

16 MAY 2016 | Riverbend Park | Cobra Clubtail (male, missing leg)

Two thick dark face bars are field markers that can be used to differentiate Cobra Clubtail from other similar looking species in the Family Gomphidae (Clubtails): Midland Clubtail (Gomphus fraternus) has no face bars; Splendid Clubtail (Gomphus lineatifrons) has thin dark face bars.

Tech Tips:

Shutter Priority mode was used for the first two photographs. Aperture Priority mode was used for the last photo, in order to increase the depth of field. As you can see, the depth of field at f/7.1 was insufficient for the tip of the dragonfly abdomen to be in focus. Typically, I wouldn’t publish the last photo, but I made an exception because it is the only photo I took that shows the face bars clearly.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male, malformed)

February 15, 2017

Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum) was spotted near a vernal pool at Huntley Meadows Park (HMP). This individual is a male, as indicated by his coloration and terminal appendages.

The male’s abdomen is slightly malformed. The malformation is more noticeable in the preceding photo and easy to overlook in the following photo.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Russet-tipped Clubtail dragonflies (males, eating)

February 13, 2017

Two Russet-tipped Clubtail dragonflies (Stylurus plagiatus) were spotted during photowalks at Mulligan PondJackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge (JMAWR). Both individuals are males, as indicated by the large russet-colored club at the end of their abdomen, “indented” hindwings (see annotated image), and their terminal appendages.

Members of the genus Stylurus are known as “Hanging Clubtails” because they usually perch hanging vertically from trees, unlike most other species of clubtails that perch horizontally on the ground.

Most of them spend much time in flight over water, leading to speculation whether species of this genus may feed in flight rather than from a perch like most other clubtails. Source Credit: Paulson, Dennis (2011-12-19). Dragonflies and Damselflies of the East (Princeton Field Guides) (Kindle Locations 6127-6128). Princeton University Press. Kindle Edition.

Both of the male Russet-tipped Clubtails featured in this post were observed feeding from a perch in a tree, although a sample size of two may be insufficient for drawing a meaningful conclusion.

22 September 2016

The first individual is eating a Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle (Harmonia axyridis) .

A Russet-tipped Clubtail dragonfly (Stylurus plagiatus) spotted at Mulligan Pond, Jackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, eating a Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle (Harmonia axyridis).

22 SEP 2016 | JMAWR | Russet-tipped Clubtail (male, eating)

The next photo is my favorite in the set. The color, clarity, and composition combine to create a beautiful canvas for conveying the brutality of the eat-or-be-eaten natural world.

A Russet-tipped Clubtail dragonfly (Stylurus plagiatus) spotted at Mulligan Pond, Jackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, eating a Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle (Harmonia axyridis).

22 SEP 2016 | JMAWR | Russet-tipped Clubtail (male, eating)

The last photo was shot using Aperture Priority mode in order to achieve maximum depth of field.

A Russet-tipped Clubtail dragonfly (Stylurus plagiatus) spotted at Mulligan Pond, Jackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, eating a Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle (Harmonia axyridis).

22 SEP 2016 | JMAWR | Russet-tipped Clubtail (male, eating)

27 September 2016

The last individual is eating an unknown species of winged insect.

A Russet-tipped Clubtail dragonfly (Stylurus plagiatus) spotted at Mulligan Pond, Jackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, eating an unknown winged insect.

27 SEP 2016 | JMAWR | Russet-tipped Clubtail (male, eating)

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Teneral

February 11, 2017

Two species of teneral dragonflies were spotted on the same day at nearly the same location in Huntley Meadows Park.

teneral: adult after it has just emerged, soft and not definitively colored Source Credit: Glossary, Some Dragonfly Terms by Dennis R. Paulson.

Both species are members of the Family Libellulidae (Skimmers). Based upon my experience, early September seems late in the year for these two species to emerge!

Blue Dasher

A Blue Dasher dragonfly (Pachydiplax longipennis) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a teneral male.

02 SEP 2016 | Huntley Meadows Park | Blue Dasher (teneral male)

This individual is a teneral male Blue Dasher dragonfly (Pachydiplax longipennis), as indicated by his terminal appendages, coloration, and the tenuous appearance of its wings. The coloration of immature male Blue Dashers resembles females of the same species.

A Blue Dasher dragonfly (Pachydiplax longipennis) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a teneral male.

02 SEP 2016 | Huntley Meadows Park | Blue Dasher (teneral male)

Eastern Pondhawk

An Eastern Pondhawk dragonfly (Erythemis simplicicollis) spotted at Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a teneral male.

02 SEP 2016 | Huntley Meadows Park | Eastern Pondhawk (teneral male)

An Eastern Pondhawk dragonfly (Erythemis simplicicollis) was spotted near the same location where the Blue Dasher dragonfly was observed. This individual is a teneral male, as indicated by his terminal appendages, coloration, and the tenuous appearance of its wings. The coloration of immature male Eastern Pondhawks resembles females of the same species.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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