Posts Tagged ‘male’

Gray Petaltail dragonfly (male)

June 19, 2019

Gray Petaltail dragonflies (Tachopteryx thoreyi) have a well-known preference for perching on gray or tan colored surfaces, including gray or tan colored clothing.

Most of the photos of Gray Petaltail featured in my blog show them perched on gray/grayish surfaces. In contrast, the following Gray Petaltail is perched on a mostly tan colored tree.

21 MAY 2019 | PNC. William County, VA | Gray Petaltail (male)

This individual — spotted in a sunny clearing along a small forest stream at an undisclosed location in Prince William County, Virginia USA — is a male, as indicated by his “indented” hind wings, and terminal appendages.

The preceding photo is uncropped, that is, full resolution for the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ300 superzoom bridge camera (4,000 x 3,000 pixels). Needless to say, I was fairly close to this cooperative subject!

Related Resource: Posts Tagged ‘Gray Petaltail dragonfly’

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

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Common Sanddragon dragonfly (male)

June 17, 2019

A Common Sanddragon dragonfly (Progomphus obscurus) was spotted by my good friend Mike Powell during a photowalk along a small forest stream at an undisclosed location in Prince William County, Virginia USA.

I was standing in the creek looking toward the sandy shoreline where the Common Sanddragon was perching.

14 JUN 2019 | PNC. William County, VA | Common Sanddragon (male)

This individual is a male, as indicated by his “indented” hind wings and terminal appendages.

14 JUN 2019 | PNC. William County, VA | Common Sanddragon (male)

Both of the photos featured in this blog post are uncropped, that is, full resolution for the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ300 superzoom bridge camera (4,000 x 3,000 pixels).

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

“Grays” come in peace.

June 10, 2019

A Gray Petaltail dragonfly (Tachopteryx thoreyi) was spotted during a photowalk with Mike Powell at Occoquan Regional Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

This individual is a male, as indicated by its “indented” hind wings and terminal appendages. The male is perched on the left sleeve of Mike’s gray “Army” logo t-shirt. I nicknamed this Gray “The Gripper” because Mike said he could feel the dragonfly tightening its grip on a small fold in the t-shirt.

“Grays”

If you look into the eyes of a Gray Petaltail dragonfly at close range, then you might agree with me that they look like the space aliens known as “Grays.” Hey, I’m just saying — Mike might have experienced a close encounter of the Gray kind!

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Gray Petaltail dragonfly (male)

May 29, 2019

Several Gray Petaltail dragonflies (Tachopteryx thoreyi) were observed during a photowalk with my good friend Mike Powell along a small forest stream at an undisclosed location in Prince William County, Virginia USA.

21 MAY 2019 | PNC. William County, VA | Gray Petaltail (male)

This individual — spotted in a sunny clearing — is a male, as indicated by his “indented” hind wings, and terminal appendages.

21 MAY 2019 | PNC. William County, VA | Gray Petaltail (male)

Both of the photos featured in this blog post are uncropped, that is, full resolution for the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ300 superzoom bridge camera (4,000 x 3,000 pixels). Needless to say, I was fairly close to this cooperative subject!

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

You look like a tree to me!

May 22, 2019

Gray Petaltail dragonflies (Tachopteryx thoreyi) have a well-known preference for perching on gray or tan colored surfaces, including gray or tan colored clothing. Dressed appropriately, Mike Powell and I visited a hotspot for Gray Petaltail where we hoped to shoot some photographs of T. thoreyi perched on each other.

The first individual is a female, perched on the front of Mike Powell’s gray sweatshirt.

21 MAY 2019 | Northern Virginia | Gray Petaltail (female)

The last individual is a male, perched on Mike Powell’s left shoulder.

21 MAY 2019 | Northern Virginia | Gray Petaltail (male)

I’m guessing the dragonflies were thinking, “Hey Mike, you look like a tree to me!” No offense intended, good buddy. In fact, I think you should be flattered that these spectacular specimens befriended you!

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Brown Spiketail dragonflies

May 6, 2019

Several Brown Spiketail dragonflies (Cordulegaster bilineata) were spotted during a photowalk with my good friend Mike Powell at Occoquan Regional Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

Male

The first individual is a male, as indicated by his “indented” hind wings, and terminal appendages. Notice the epiproct for Brown Spiketail is a wide “plate” that spans both cerci, as shown in the full-size version of the following photo.

The next individual is also male, as indicated by his hamules, located below abdominal segments two and three (S2 and S3).

Female

The last individual is a female, as indicated by her rounded hind wings and terminal appendages.

Credits

Thanks to Michael Boatwright, founder and administrator of the Virginia Odonata Facebook group, for confirming my tentative identification of the gender of the first and last individuals.

Phenology

Phenology (noun) is defined as “the study of cyclic and seasonal natural phenomena, especially in relation to climate and plant and animal life.”

There is an annual cycle of odonate activity that can be subdivided into three broad categories: Early Season (spring); Mid-season (summer); and Late Season (fall).

Brown Spiketail is an “Early Season” species for locations in the Commonwealth of Virginia. I have noticed that the adult flight period for a given species of odonate in Northern Virginia tends to lag behind Amherst County, where my good friend Mike Boatwright (Mike B) lives, by about one-to-two weeks. When Mike B reported his first sighting of Brown Spiketail on 24 April in Amherst County, I knew it wouldn’t be long until Brown Spiketail would be flying in Fairfax County. Eight (8) days later, Mike Powell and I spotted our first-of-season Brown Spiketail dragonflies. Thanks for the heads-up, Mike B!

Related Resources

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Uhler’s Sundragon (male)

April 17, 2019

A Uhler’s Sundragon (Helocordulia uhleri) was spotted during a photowalk along a mid-size stream at an undisclosed location in Northern Virginia USA. Uhler’s Sundragon is a new species for my life list of odonates.

16 APR 2019 | Northern Virginia | Uhler’s Sundragon (male)

This individual is a male, as indicated by its “indented” hind wings and terminal appendages.

Off-season Homework Pays Dividends

Planning for the next season is a good way to stay connected with odonates during the winter months. One off-season activity that can pay big dividends in the future is to research sites for finding new life-list species of dragonflies and damselflies, especially rare and uncommon species.

Uhler’s is No. 1 on my list of target species for 2019. During the winter of 2018-2019, I researched potential sites for finding Uhler’s Sundragon. I’m pleased to report “Mission accomplished!”

Credits

I’ve been dogged by, er, let’s just say “transportation issues” for months. Sincere thanks to my buddy Mike Powell for scouting one of the sites I researched and guiding me to a couple spots where he found Uhler’s. Good work, Mike — couldn’t have done it without you!

Also thanks to Michael Boatwright, founder and administrator of the Virginia Odonata Facebook group, for providing lots of practical tips for finding Uhler’s Sundragon in the field.

Related Resources

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies (males)

April 5, 2019

Two Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum ambiguum) were spotted at Old Colchester Park and Preserve (OCPP), Fairfax County, Virginia USA. There is a true vernal pool at the park where Blue-faced Meadowhawks are relatively abundant.

03 OCT 2016 | OCPP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male)

Both individuals are male, as indicated by their coloration and terminal appendages.

03 OCT 2016 | OCPP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male)

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Powdered Dancer damselflies (males)

April 3, 2019

Two Powdered Dancer damselflies (Argia moesta) were spotted along Popes Head Creek near the town of Clifton, Virginia in Fairfax County USA. The stream is accessible via Chapel Road Park.

22 AUG 2016 | Chapel Road Park | Powdered Dancer (male)

Both individuals are male.

22 AUG 2016 | Chapel Road Park | Powdered Dancer (male)

Credits

Sincere thanks to Michael Boatwright, founder and administrator of the Virginia Odonata Facebook group, for help in verifying my tentative identification of the gender of these specimens. (I wanted to be sure neither individual is a blue morph female.)

Related Resource: Powdered Dancer damselfly (female). [tan morph]

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Blue-fronted Dancers (male, female)

March 22, 2019

Male

A Blue-fronted Dancer damselfly (Argia apicalis) was spotted near Mulligan Pond at Jackson Miles Abbott Wetland Refuge, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

This individual is a male, as indicated by the pattern of blue coloration on his thorax and abdomen, plus the blue coloration on abdominal segments eight through 10 (S8-10).

25 SEP 2016 | Jackson Miles Abbott WR | Blue-fronted Dancer (male)

Female

Several Blue-fronted Dancers were spotted during a photowalk along Accotink Creek/Great Blue Heron Trail at Accotink Bay Wildlife Refuge (ABWR), Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

The first individual is a female, as indicated by two field marks.

Eyes brown, darker above; lack of blue in eyes in andromorph good distinction from male. Source Credit: Paulson, Dennis (2011-12-19). Dragonflies and Damselflies of the East (Princeton Field Guides) (Kindle Locations 3451-3452). Princeton University Press. Kindle Edition.

Female Blue-fronted Dancers are polymorphicandromorph females are blue like males; heteromorph females are brown-green. Andromorph females tend to be a lighter shade of blue than males of the same species.

This individual is a blue andromorph. Regardless of the color morph…

females never have blue on the last abdominal segments (S8-10). Source Credit: Michael Boatwright, founder and administrator of the Virginia Odonata Facebook group.

02 AUG 2016 | ABWR | Blue-fronted Dancer (female)

More males

Two male Blue-fronted Dancers were spotted at Accotink Bay Wildlife Refuge.

02 AUG 2016 | ABWR | Blue-fronted Dancer (male)

02 AUG 2016 | ABWR | Blue-fronted Dancer (male)

Copyright © 2019 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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