Posts Tagged ‘terminal appendages’

“Bender” on bark

June 20, 2018

I nicknamed this male Gray Petaltail dragonfly (Tachopteryx thoreyi) “Bender” because of his malformed abdomen.

06 JUN 2018 | Northern Virginia | Gray Petaltail (male)

Bender is shown perched on a tree that fell across a forested seep. It’s possible the tree makes the seep seepier, and that’s a good thing for the Gray Petaltail larvae that are well-adapted for this specific type of habitat.

06 JUN 2018 | Northern Virginia | Gray Petaltail (male)

Just look at that face — Bender exudes personality! In the following photo, Bender perched in a spot so that he was looking at me directly. Yep, that’s when we bonded.

06 JUN 2018 | Northern Virginia | Gray Petaltail (male)

Next post: “Bender” on grass. No, wait — that doesn’t sound right!

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

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Ebony Jewelwing damselfly (male)

June 18, 2018

Look for Ebony Jewelwing damselflies (Calopteryx maculata) beginning in late-May/early-June along almost any small- to mid-size forested stream in Northern Virginia (USA).

This individual is a male, as indicated by the all-black coloration of his wings and by his terminal appendages.

Ebony Jewelwing is a member of Family Calopterygidae (Broad-winged Damselflies). American Rubyspot (Hetaerina americana) is the only other species of Broad-winged Damselfly found in Northern Virginia.

Related Resource: The adult flight period for Ebony Jewelwing is from April 27 to October 06, according to records for the Commonwealth of Virginia maintained by Dr. Steve Roble, a zoologist at the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, Division of Natural Heritage.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Tree-hugger

June 16, 2018

The following photo shows a Gray Petaltail dragonfly (Tachopteryx thoreyi) that was spotted near a forested seep. This individual is a male, as indicated by his “indented” hind wings and terminal appendages.

06 JUN 2018 | Northern Virginia | Gray Petaltail (male)

This guy bounced off my left shoulder before he landed on a nearby tree. Gray Petaltail readily perch on gray and tan colored surfaces, including clothing like the “sand” colored long-sleeve t-shirt and khaki vest I was wearing at the time of my close encounter with one of the Grays.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Sable strong

June 14, 2018

A few days after my first spotting of Sable Clubtail dragonflies (Stenogomphurus rogersi) at a small forested stream located in Fairfax County, Virginia USA, I was happy to see several Sable during a return trip to the same place.

The following individual is a male, as indicated by his “indented” hind wings and terminal appendages.

12 JUN 2018 | Fairfax County, VA | Sable Clubtail (male)

The male was perched in a small, sunny clearing alongside the stream during mid-morning. As direct sunlight shifted toward the stream, several males started perching on vegetation overhanging the creek, about a foot-or-two above the water.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Introducing “Bender”

June 12, 2018

Gray Petaltail dragonfly (Tachopteryx thoreyi) was spotted at a forested seep. This individual is a male, as indicated by his “indented” hind wings and terminal appendages.

06 JUN 2018 | Northern Virginia | Gray Petaltail (male)

I nicknamed this male “Bender” because of his malformed abdomen. Bender is a scrappy fighter who aggressively defended his territory against other odonate intruders!

More photos of Bender will be published in one or more upcoming blog posts.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Sable Clubtail dragonfly (male)

June 10, 2018

A Sable Clubtail dragonfly (Stenogomphurus rogersi) was spotted perched alongside a small forested stream located in Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, as indicated by his “indented” hind wings and terminal appendages.

08 JUN 2018 | Fairfax County, VA | Sable Clubtail (male)

The following photo shows the lotic habitat in which Sable Clubtail lives. You’re looking down into the stream channel: the channel is a few feet deep; the stream itself is no more than a foot wide and a few inches deep.

08 JUN 2018 | Fairfax County, VA | small stream

When I scouted the location during the off-season I recall thinking, “I don’t see clubtails coming from this tiny stream!” Once again I am reminded that dismissive thinking can be wrong-headed.

Sable Clubtail has a limited range and is classified as a rare to uncommon species of odonate. It is a prized addition to my “life list” of dragonflies!

The following map shows all official records for Sable Clubtail in the United States of America.

DSA Distribution Viewer | Sable Clubtail

Source Credit: Abbott, J.C. 2006-2018. OdonataCentral: An online resource for the distribution and identification of Odonata. Available at http://www.odonatacentral.org. (Accessed: June 11, 2018).

Key: blue dots = Dot Map Project; green dots = Accepted records; yellow dots = Pending records.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Camouflage

June 8, 2018

A Gray Petaltail dragonfly (Tachopteryx thoreyi) was spotted during a photowalk at Occoquan Regional Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, as indicated by his “indented” hind wings and terminal appendages.

04 JUN 2018 | Occoquan Regional Park | Gray Petaltail (male)

Look closely at the full-size version of all three images. Notice the dragonfly is eating a large, cream-colored winged insect, probably either a butterfly or moth.

04 JUN 2018 | Occoquan Regional Park | Gray Petaltail (male)

Many photographers “chimp” after every photo they take, that is, look at the image on the camera LCD. I chimp rarely — you can’t be sure an image is tack-sharp until you look at it on a large-screen display. In this case, it was so difficult to see the dragonfly perched on similarly colored tree bark that I chimped to be sure I’d actually nailed the shot. Don’t be fooled by the images in this post — significantly enhanced by post-processing — it was nearly impossible to see the subject!

04 JUN 2018 | Occoquan Regional Park | Gray Petaltail (male)

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Gray Petaltail dragonfly (female)

May 31, 2018

Eureka! I found one of my “Great White Whale” dragonfly species after years of fruitless searching.

30 MAY 2018 | Northern Virginia | Gray Petaltail (female)

A Gray Petaltail dragonfly (Tachopteryx thoreyi) was spotted at a forested seep, shown below. This individual is a female, as indicated by her rounded hind wings and terminal appendages. Thanks to Mike Boatwright for verifying my tentative identification of the gender.

23 MAY 2018 | Northern Virginia | forested seep

Gray Petaltail is classified as an uncommon species of odonate. It is a prized addition to my “life list” of dragonflies!

The following map shows all official records for Gray Petaltail in the United States of America.

DSA Distribution Viewer | Gray Petaltail

Source Credit: Abbott, J.C. 2006-2018. OdonataCentral: An online resource for the distribution and identification of Odonata. Available at http://www.odonatacentral.org. (Accessed: June 13, 2018).

Key: blue dots = Dot Map Project; green dots = Accepted records; yellow dots = Pending records.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Another summer species of odonate

May 29, 2018

Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) is another summer species of odonate that appears in Northern Virginia in late spring. The following individual — spotted at Hidden Pond during a photowalk at Meadowood Recreation Area (MRA), Fairfax County, Virginia USA — is a male, as indicated by his coloration and terminal appendages.

Blue Dasher is a habitat generalist that “can be found almost anywhere there is still water.” Source Credit: Species Pachydiplax longipennis – Blue Dasher.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Seamless transition

May 27, 2018

A seamless transition from the spring species of odonates to the summer species is slowly but surely underway.

Spangled Skimmer (Libellula cyanea) is a summer species that starts to appear in Northern Virginia in late spring. The following individual — spotted at Hidden Pond during a photowalk at Meadowood Recreation Area (MRA), Fairfax County, Virginia USA — is a teneral female, as indicated by her tenuous wings and terminal appendages.

21 MAY 2018 | MRA | Spangled Skimmer (teneral female)

Female Spangled Skimmers have a pair of flanges beneath their eighth abdominal segment that are used to scoop and hold a few drops of water when laying eggs (oviposition), hence the family name “Skimmer.” Remember that all dragonflies and damselflies have a 10-segmented abdomen, numbered from front to back.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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