Posts Tagged ‘Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly’

Male Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies

February 4, 2018

On the same day that I saw a male Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum) with an eye injury, one or more other males were photographed at the same location in Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male)

Please look at the full-size version of each photo in order to fully appreciate these handsome little devils!

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male)

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male)

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male)

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male)

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

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Eye injury

January 31, 2018

A Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum) was spotted near a vernal pool at remote location in Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, as indicated by his terminal appendages.

When I post-processed the RAW images of the male dragonfly I noticed he has an eye injury, highlighted in the following annotated image.

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male, with eye injury)

(See a full-size version of the original photo, without annotation.)

The eye injury can be seen in two more photos of the same male.

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male, with eye injury)

22 OCT 2017 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male, with eye injury)

Related Resource: Eye injury, a blog post by Walter Sanford, featuring photos of a female andromorph Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly spotted on 18 September 2013 along the boardwalk of the central wetland area at Huntley Meadows Park.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Lunch time

January 21, 2018

A Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum ambiguum) was spotted at ~12:13 p.m. near a vernal pool at a remote location in Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, eating an unknown species of winged insect.

25 OCT 2017 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male, eating)

The first photo is the scene-setter.

25 OCT 2017 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male, eating)

The last two photos are cropped so that the predator and prey are more prominent. The dragonfly barely moved from the first-to-last photos; the position of the butterfly/moth moved slightly as it was eaten.

25 OCT 2017 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male, eating)

Did you notice there are three insects shown in each photo? Perhaps the fly is an opportunist, waiting to clean-up the leftovers from the dragonfly’s lunch.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Unambiguously Sympetrum ambiguum

November 10, 2017

Two Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum ambiguum) were spotted during a photowalk along Charlie Road at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA. Although Blue-faced Meadowhawk is on the species list of dragonflies and damselflies at Occoquan Bay NWR, this is the first time I have seen Sympetrum ambiguum at the refuge.

Male

This first individual is a male, as indicated by his terminal appendages.

19 OCT 2017 | OBNWR | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (male)

This guy was skittish. I was able to take one photo before he flew toward the tree canopy. The preceding photograph is what my good friend Mike Boatwright calls a “record shot,” that is, a photograph that records (verifies) my sighting of the male Sympetrum ambiguum. The photo was cropped slightly for improved composition.

Female

The last individual is a female heteromorph, as indicated by her tan coloration and terminal appendages.

The preceding photograph is my “record shot” of the female. I worked the shot…

…until I found the best viewpoint, shown below.

The first and last photos of the female were cropped slightly for improved composition; the second photo is uncropped.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Blue-faced Meadowhawk (Batch 4)

October 23, 2017

Batch 4 (of 4). Please look at the full-size version of each photo.

Several male Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum ambiguum) were spotted near a vernal pool at a remote location in Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

The first photograph is my favorite in this batch; the second photo is, well, a close second place.

Related Resources

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Blue-faced Meadowhawk (Batch 3)

October 21, 2017

This gallery features photos from Batch 3 (of 4) showing male Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum ambiguum) spotted during a recent photowalk around a vernal pool at a remote location in Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

Here’s looking at you, kid.

The last photograph is my favorite in this batch.

Related Resources

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

More Blue-faced Meadowhawk

October 17, 2017

Batch 2 (of 4). Please look at the full-size version of each photo.

Several male Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum ambiguum) were spotted near a vernal pool at a remote location in Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

The last photograph is my favorite in this batch. Which photo is your favorite?

Related Resource: Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies [Batch 1].

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Time to mate (Fall 2017)

October 11, 2017

I speculate Blue-faced Meadowhawk is an arboreal species of dragonfly that returns to the ground/water when it’s time to mate.

A mating pair of Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum ambiguum) was spotted near a drainage ditch alongside a vernal pool at a remote location in Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This pair is “in wheel“: the male is on top; the female on the bottom. The female is a heteromorph, as indicated by her tan coloration.

All dragonflies and damselflies have a 10-segmented abdomen, numbered from front to back: male dragonfly secondary genitalia, called hamules, are located in segments two and three (S2 and S3); female genitalia in segment eight (S8). Dragonflies form the mating wheel in order for their genitalia to connect during copulation.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies

October 9, 2017

“Target(s) acquired. Shots fired!” That’s my generic field report after a successful odonate hunting excursion. Usually I have an idea of the target species I hope to see every time I go photowalking. Shadow Darner dragonfly, Great Spreadwing damselfly, and Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonfly were the target species for a recent trip to a favorite hotspot where all three types of odonates can be found.

Several Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum ambiguum) were spotted near a vernal pool at a remote location in Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

Both individuals featured in this blog post are male, as indicated by their terminal appendages and turquoise-colored faces.

Blue-faced Meadowhawk is classified as a fall species of odonate. In the mid-Atlantic United States, meadowhawks seem to disappear for several months after they emerge during early summer and reappear during fall. Where do they go? No one knows for sure. I speculate Blue-faced Meadowhawk is an arboreal species of dragonfly that returns to the ground/water when it’s time to mate.

Consistent with my speculation, Blue-faced Meadowhawk seems to prefer habitats where standing water is found near the forest, such as the small vernal pool located at a clearing in the forest at Huntley Meadows Park. Be on the lookout for Blue-faced Meadowhawk everywhere you find similar habitat.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Blue-faced Meadowhawks (mating pair)

March 27, 2017

A mating pair of Blue-faced Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum ambiguum) was spotted near a vernal pool at Huntley Meadows Park (HMP). This pair is “in wheel“: the male is on the upper-right; the female on the lower-left.

16 OCT 2016 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (mating pair, “in wheel“)

The female is a heteromorph, as indicated by her tan coloration.

16 OCT 2016 | HMP | Blue-faced Meadowhawk (mating pair, “in wheel“)

There were noticeably fewer Blue-faced Meadowhawks at this location than in past years. It’s reassuring to see this pair doing their part to ensure perpetuation of the species.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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