Posts Tagged ‘Meadowood Recreation Area’

Another summer species of odonate

May 29, 2018

Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) is another summer species of odonate that appears in Northern Virginia in late spring. The following individual — spotted at Hidden Pond during a photowalk at Meadowood Recreation Area (MRA), Fairfax County, Virginia USA — is a male, as indicated by his coloration and terminal appendages.

Blue Dasher is a habitat generalist that “can be found almost anywhere there is still water.” Source Credit: Species Pachydiplax longipennis – Blue Dasher.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

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Seamless transition

May 27, 2018

A seamless transition from the spring species of odonates to the summer species is slowly but surely underway.

Spangled Skimmer (Libellula cyanea) is a summer species that starts to appear in Northern Virginia in late spring. The following individual — spotted at Hidden Pond during a photowalk at Meadowood Recreation Area (MRA), Fairfax County, Virginia USA — is a teneral female, as indicated by her tenuous wings and terminal appendages.

21 MAY 2018 | MRA | Spangled Skimmer (teneral female)

Female Spangled Skimmers have a pair of flanges beneath their eighth abdominal segment that are used to scoop and hold a few drops of water when laying eggs (oviposition), hence the family name “Skimmer.” Remember that all dragonflies and damselflies have a 10-segmented abdomen, numbered from front to back.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Survivors

May 25, 2018

The adult flight period for Blue Corporal dragonfly (Ladona deplanata) is from March 09 to July 09, according to records for the Commonwealth of Virginia maintained by Dr. Steve Roble; records for Northern Virginia maintained by Kevin Munroe show the flight period is from the second week in April to the first week in June. In my experience, the third week in May is late for Blue Corporal.

Meadowood Recreation Area

A single Blue Corporal dragonfly was spotted perched on the dock at Hidden Pond, Meadowood Recreation Area (MRA), Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a mature male, as indicated by his terminal appendages and dark blue pruinescence covering the body.

21 MAY 2018 | MRA | Blue Corporal (mature male)

Contrast the appearance of a mature male Blue Corporal with teneral males of the same species spotted on 26 April 2018 at Occoquan Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Prince William County, Virginia USA.

21 MAY 2018 | MRA | Blue Corporal (mature male)

Prince William Forest Park

Two days later, another mature male Blue Corporal was spotted perched on the railing of an observation platform at a small pond located in Prince William Forest Park, Prince William County, Virginia USA.

23 MAY 2018 | MRA | Blue Corporal (mature male)

Editor’s Notes: Dr. Steve Roble is a zoologist at the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, Division of Natural Heritage. Kevin Munroe is the former manager of Huntley Meadows Park, Fairfax County, Virginia.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

American Lady butterfly

February 20, 2018

An American Lady butterfly (Vanessa virginiensis) was spotted during a photowalk at Meadowood Recreation Area, Fairfax County, Virginia USA.

This butterfly looks similar to several species with which I’m familiar but isn’t a perfect match, so I consulted the experts on the BugGuide Facebook group. Sincere thanks to Matt Pelikan, Jack Blackford, and Ken Childs for help in identifying the butterfly.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Top 10 Photos of 2017

January 1, 2018

The following gallery shows 32 finalists for my “Top 10 Photos of 2017.” The photos are presented in reverse-chronological order beginning in November 2017 and ending in April 2017.

The Top 10 photos will be selected using reader feedback. Please enter a comment at the end of this post listing the number for each of your 10 favorite photos. If listing 10 photos is asking too much, then please list at least five photos, e.g., No. 5, 8, 14, 17, 21, etc. Thanks for sharing your selections, and thanks for following my photoblog!

No. 1

No. 2

No. 3

27 OCT 2017 | MRA | Autumn Meadowhawk (mating pair, “in tandem“)

No. 4

No. 5

No. 6

No. 7

No. 8

No. 9

No. 10

No. 11

No. 12

No. 13

No. 14

No. 15

No. 16

No. 17

No. 18

No. 19

No. 20

No. 21

20 JUN 2017 | OBNWR | Calico Pennant (immature male)

No. 22

No. 23

10 MAY 2017 | HORP | crayfish (underwater)

No. 24

No. 25

No. 26

No. 27

No. 28

No. 29

No. 30

No. 31

No. 32

Editor’s Note: The following location codes are used in some photo captions, shown above.

Copyright © 2018 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Autumn Meadowhawks (mating pairs, in tandem)

November 8, 2017

Two mating pairs of Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum vicinum) were photographed at Hidden Pond, Meadowood Recreation Area (MRA), Fairfax County, Virginia USA. Both pairs are “in tandem.”

The first pair is perching on the small wooden dock at Hidden Pond: the male is on the upper-right; the female is on the lower-left.

27 OCT 2017 | MRA | Autumn Meadowhawk (mating pair, “in tandem“)

The last pair is perching on an American sweetgum tree (Liquidambar styraciflua) growing alongside the dock. I love the way the fall coloration of the tree leaves complements the coloration of the dragonflies! The male is on the upper-left; the female is on the lower-right.

27 OCT 2017 | MRA | Autumn Meadowhawk (mating pair, “in tandem“)

Tech Tips

The photographs in this gallery were taken using my Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150 superzoom digital camera set for ~24x zoom (focal length of 600mm, 35mm equivalent), and Canon 580EX Speedlite external flash (manual mode).

In order to reduce “camera shake,” the camera was set for shutter priority mode. Using the reciprocal rule, the shutter speed was set for 1/800s. The ISO was set for “100.” An inexpensive Sunpak 6700M aluminum monopod was used for added stability.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Lumix loves him some head-tilts!

November 6, 2017

An Autumn Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum vicinum) was spotted at Hidden Pond, Meadowood Recreation Area, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. This individual is a male, as indicated by his terminal appendages.

Regular readers of my photoblog know I’m fond of head-tilts in which the dragonfly seems to display some of its personality, especially when the individual is looking at me (below).

OK, so no head-tilt in the last photo, but I like the knot in the wooden dock on which the dragonfly is perching.

Tech Tips

The photographs in this gallery were taken using my Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150 superzoom digital camera set for ~24x zoom (focal length of 600mm, 35mm equivalent), and Canon 580EX Speedlite external flash (manual mode).

In order to reduce “camera shake,” the camera was set for shutter priority mode. Using the reciprocal rule, the shutter speed was set for 1/800s. The ISO was set for “100.” An inexpensive Sunpak 6700M aluminum monopod was used for added stability.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies (mating pairs)

November 4, 2017

This blog post features more photos taken using my Fujifilm X-T1 digital camera, Fujinon XF55-200mm zoom lens, and a Fujifilm MCEX-11 extension tube. The camera was set for manual focus in order to use focus peaking; back-button focusing was used to focus automatically.

In wheel

ISO 640 | 200mm (~300mm, 35mm equivalent) | f/11 | 1/500s | 0.33 ev

Two of many mating pairs of Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum vicinum) were photographed on 27 October 2017 at Hidden Pond, Meadowood Recreation Area, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. Both pairs are “in wheel“: the male is on top; the female is on the bottom.

ISO 800 | 200mm (~300mm, 35mm equivalent) | f/18 | 1/500s | 0 ev

In tandem

The last mating pair is “in tandem“: the male is on the upper-right; the female is on the lower-left.

ISO 800 | 200mm (~300mm, 35mm equivalent) | f/16 | 1/500s | 0 ev

After copulation, Autumn Meadowhawks engage in a form of guarding behavior known as “contact guarding,” in which the male and female fly “in tandem” to egg-laying sites. Contact guarding is used by some species of odonates to prevent aggressive males from hijacking the female.

Related Resource: Adding an 11mm extension tube, a blog post by Walter Sanford.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Adding an 11mm extension tube

November 2, 2017

Optics theory

The net effect of adding an extension tube between a lens and camera body is the “working distance” is decreased, that is, the distance from the front of the lens barrel to the subject is decreased. A smaller working distance means the same lens will focus closer to the subject, thereby increasing magnification.

The effect is greater at shorter focal lengths, as shown by the following annotated table of magnification for the two extension tubes sold by Fujifilm USA.

Table courtesy Fujifilm USA.

Theory into practice

On 27 October 2017 several Autumn Meadowhawk dragonflies (Sympetrum vicinum) were spotted perching on the small dock at Hidden Pond, Meadowood Recreation Area, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. All individuals featured in this photo gallery are male, as indicated by their terminal appendages.

All photos in this set were taken using my Fujifilm X-T1 digital camera, Fujinon XF55-200mm zoom lens, and a Fujifilm MCEX-11 extension tube. The camera was set for manual focus in order to use focus peaking; back-button focusing was used to focus automatically.

At 200mm, the working distance of the lens is 905 mm (90.5 cm, ~35.63 in), or approximately three (3) feet. With an 11mm extension tube mounted between the lens and camera body, the working distance is reduced to 665 mm (66.5 cm, ~26.2 in), or a little more than two (2) feet. At a focal length of 55mm, adding the extension tube would result in photos that look more like “macro” photos; at 200mm, adding the extension tube resulted in photos that look like a lens with a longer focal length was used to take the shots.

All of the following photos were slightly cropped for improved composition. The 11mm extension tube is the difference-maker that enables me to take close-up shots using a mid-range telephoto zoom lens such as the Fujinon 55-200mm.

ISO 640 | 200mm (~300mm, 35mm equivalent) | f/11 | 1/500s | -1 ev

ISO 640 | 200mm (~300mm, 35mm equivalent) | f/11 | 1/500s | -1 ev

When I changed the aperture from f/11 to f/16 (larger to smaller opening) for more depth-of-field, notice the ISO increased from 640 to 800. ISO was set for “Auto” with a limit of 800.

ISO 800 | 200mm (~300mm, 35mm equivalent) | f/16 | 1/500s | 0 ev

ISO 800 | 200mm (~300mm, 35mm equivalent) | f/16 | 1/500s | 0 ev

ISO 800 | 200mm (~300mm, 35mm equivalent) | f/16 | 1/500s | 0 ev

ISO 800 | 200mm (~300mm, 35mm equivalent) | f/16 | 1/500s | 0 ev

More tech tips

Focus peaking can be activated when the camera is set for manual focus mode. Using back-button focus (AF-L button) in manual mode enables one to retain full control of the exposure triangle, focus quickly, and see what’s in focus before shooting a photograph. Fuji Back Button Focus (4:06), a YouTube video by Ashraf Jandali, provides a clear demonstration of how to use back-button focus on the Fujifilm X-T1.

In order to reduce “camera shake,” I almost always shoot in shutter priority mode using the reciprocal rule. Remember, it’s the 35mm equivalent that matters: since my lens is ~300mm, the shutter speed should be set for at least 1/300s; in this case, it was set for 1/500s. In manual mode, I set the shutter speed and aperture; ISO was set for “Auto” with a limit of 800. An inexpensive Sunpak 6700M aluminum monopod was used for added stability.

Editor’s notes

Did you notice I didn’t use an external flash unit to shoot the preceding photos? The afternoon Sun is lower in the sky in late-October than it would be at the same time during mid-summer. I wanted to faithfully capture the shadows cast by the dragonflies in order to convey the feeling that the Sun is setting on these dragonflies, literally for the day as well as figuratively for the current odonate season.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.

Blue Corporal dragonflies (males)

April 24, 2017

Several Blue Corporal dragonflies (Ladona deplanata) were spotted at Hidden Pond, Meadowood Recreation Area, Fairfax County, Virginia USA. All of the individuals featured in this post are males, as indicated by their coloration and terminal appendages.

Blue Corporals are among the first species of odonates to emerge in the spring, beginning in mid-April. Hidden Pond is one of a few places in Northern Virginia where Blue Corporals are relatively common.

Although Blue Corporals prefer to perch flat on the ground, sometimes they pose for “Odonarty” photos, as shown below.

Copyright © 2017 Walter Sanford. All rights reserved.


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